Streams

Zephyr Teachout Takes on Corruption in Politics

Wednesday, October 01, 2014

Zephyr Teachout looks at the history of bribery, lobbying, and corruption and argues that the Citizen’s United ruling is transforming American politics for the worse.
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What Are We Giving Up for the Convenience of Technology?

Tuesday, September 30, 2014

Nicholas Carr argues that shifting our attention to computer screens can leave us disengaged and discontented. He looks closely at factory robots and self-driving cars, wearable computers and digitized medicine, to uncover the hidden costs of giving software so much power over our lives. He argues that even though they make our lives easier, these programs are stealing something essential from us. His book The Glass Cage: Automation and Us draws on psychological and neurological studies that reveal how tightly people’s happiness and satisfaction are tied to performing hard work in the real world. 

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Apartheid Through the Eyes of One of South Africa’s First Black Photojournalists

Tuesday, September 30, 2014

In the mid-1960s, photojournalist Ernest Cole undertook a dangerous mission—to produce a volume of photographs that would reveal to the world the excruciating realities of life under apartheid. The result was the groundbreaking book House of Bondage: A South African Black Man Exposes in His Own Pictures and Words the Bitter Life of His Homeland Today, published in 1967 with an introduction by Joseph Lelyveld. Lelyveld discusses Cole’s work and legacy and the upcoming exhibition "Ernest Cole: Photographer” at NYU’s Grey Art Gallery. It is on view through December 6.

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Negotiating the Middle East Peace Process, and Documenting Apartheid in South Africa

Tuesday, September 30, 2014

Lawrence Wright gives the details behind what happened in 1978 at Camp David, when the first peace treaty in the modern Middle East was signed. Joseph Lelyveld talks about the late photojournalist Ernest Cole, who exposed what life was like under apartheid in South Africa. Damon Galgut talks about his new novel, Arctic Summer. Nicholas Carr argues that shifting our attention to computer screens can leave us disengaged and discontented.

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Arctic Summer, a Fictional Biography of E.M. Forester's A Passage to India

Tuesday, September 30, 2014

Damon Galgut talks about his new novel, Arctic Summer, a fictionalized biography of English author E. M. Forster. The story focuses on Forster's many years in India and the process of writing his masterpiece, A Passage to India, and delves into Forster's unforgiving childhood in England and the homosexuality he feared and repressed throughout his life. 

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The Thirteen Days that Changed the Middle East Peace Process

Tuesday, September 30, 2014

At the 1978 Camp David, conference President Jimmy Carter persuaded Israeli prime minister Menachem Begin and Egyptian president Anwar Sadat to sign the first peace treaty in the modern Middle East, one which endures to this day. Lawrence Wright gives a day-by-day account of the thirteen days of the Camp David conference and looks into why the problems of the region are so intractable. His book Thirteen Days in September: Carter, Begin, and Sadat at Camp David  gives in-depth accounts of the lives of the three leaders and draws vivid portraits of other fiery personalities who were present at Camp David — including Moshe Dayan, Osama el-Baz, and Zbigniew Brzezinski — as they work furiously behind the scenes. Wright also explores the significant role played by Rosalynn Carter. 

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Tennessee Williams' Hidden Drama

Monday, September 29, 2014

Drama critic John Lahr discusses the life and work of Tennessee Williams, one of the most brilliant dramatists of his century, whose plays reshaped the American theater and the nation's sense of itself. Lahr’s new biography, Tennessee Williams: Mad Pilgrimage of the Flesh, sheds a light on Tennessee Williams's warring family, his guilt, his creative triumphs and failures, his sexuality and numerous affairs, his misreported death, even the shenanigans surrounding his estate. The book was just nominated for the longlist for nonfiction for this year's National Book Awards.

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The Stories Behind the Accidental Inventors Who Shaped the World

Monday, September 29, 2014

Steven Johnson tells some surprising stories of accidental genius and brilliant mistakes that led to the invention of some everyday objects of modern life. He explores the history of innovation of refrigeration, clocks, and eyeglass lenses, among others, from their creation by hobbyists, amateurs, and entrepreneurs to their unintended consequences. His book How We Got to Now: Six Innovations That Made the Modern World investigates the secret history behind important inventions.

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Poet Richard Blanco on Figuring Out His Identity and Place in America

Monday, September 29, 2014

Richard Blanco, who read at President Obama’s second inauguration, was the first Latino and openly gay inaugural poet. He talks about his new memoir about his childhood.
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How Google (the Business) Works

Monday, September 29, 2014

A longtime Google employee shares lessons he learned as he helped build the company into a global icon and technology innovator.
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Invention and Creativity in Business and Art

Monday, September 29, 2014

How Google works. Poet Richard Blanco. John Lahr on Tennessee Williams. How things like refrigeration, clocks, eyeglass lenses and Wi-Fi were invented.
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Mercury Rising: Which Fish - and How Much - Is Safe to Eat

Friday, September 26, 2014

Eating too much fish could mean consuming too much mercury. On this week's Please Explain, an experts from Consumer Reports tell us which fish is safest, which to avoid.
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Ever Wonder How the Hotel Astor Served their Virginia Ham in February, 1933?

Friday, September 26, 2014

Wonder no more. The New York Public Library just released 17,389 historic New York City menus online. If you're planning a throwback dinner party, here's your resource. 
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Cooking For Your Family With America's Test Kitchen

Friday, September 26, 2014

Feeding your family doesn't have to be stressful or boring. Here's how to make it fun and delicious. 
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Recipe: America's Test Kitchen's Skillet Apple Crisp

Friday, September 26, 2014

Serves 6 to 8  Total time 1 hour 25 minutes

Why this recipe works: We wanted an exemplary apple crisp—a lush (but not mushy) sweet-tart apple filling covered with truly crisp morsels of topping. Our first few crisps contained unevenly cooked apples; stirring the fruit helped solve the texture problem, but reaching into a hot oven to do so was a hassle. Instead, we softened the apples on the stovetop—in a skillet. The shallow, flared pan also encouraged evaporation, browning, and better flavor overall. To improve the flavor further, we turned to apple cider, reducing it to a syrupy consistency. As for the topping, we added brown sugar to the white to play up the apples’ caramel notes, and swapped out some flour for rolled oats to give the topping character and chew. Chopped pecans not only improved the crunch factor, but added a rich flavor as well. If your skillet is not ovensafe, prepare the recipe through step 3 and then transfer the filling to a 13 by 9‑inch baking dish; top the filling as directed and bake for 5 minutes longer than the times given in the recipe. We like Golden Delicious apples in this recipe, but Honeycrisp or Braeburn apples can be substituted; do not use Granny Smith apples. While old-fashioned rolled oats are preferable in this recipe, quick oats can be substituted; do not use instant oats. Serve with vanilla ice cream.

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Recipe: America's Test Kitchen's Pumpkin Bread

Friday, September 26, 2014

Makes 2 loaves  Total Time 1 Hour 40 Minutes
(plus 1 1/2 hours cooling time)

Why this recipe works: Canned pumpkin puree often lends a raw, metallic flavor to pumpkin bread. We cook down the puree to eliminate those off-putting flavors. Instead of dirtying more dishes, we mix the quick bread right in the pot, adding cream cheese and buttermilk for their tangy flavor. A quick-to-assemble topping adds texture and keeps the loaf from getting soggy the next day. The test kitchen’s preferred loaf pan measures 8 1/2 by 4 1/2 inches; if using 9 by 5‑inch loaf pans, start checking for doneness 5 minutes early.

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Recipe: America's Test Kitchen's Oven-Baked Buffalo Wings

Friday, September 26, 2014

Serves 4 to 6  Total Time 1 hour

Why this recipe works: For this barroom classic, we set out to ditch the deep fryer but still turn out wings that wouldn’t disappoint. Baking powder helped to dry out the skin so it became crisp when roasted in a superhot oven; baking the wings on a wire rack let the rendered fat drip away. A quick stint under the broiler crisped the skin even further and ensured a flavorful char. A spoonful of molasses added depth and richness to these oven-baked yet still finger-licking-good Buffalo wings. The mild flavor of Frank’s RedHot Original Cayenne Pepper Sauce is crucial to the flavor of this dish; we don’t suggest substituting another hot sauce here. Serve with Creamy Blue Cheese Dip.

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Family Meals, Menus through History, Mercury in Fish

Friday, September 26, 2014

Jack Bishop from America’s Test Kitchen offers advice for making cooking family meals. The NYPL's “What’s on the Menu?” project. Polish food in Greenpoint. Mercury in fish.
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Eating Around the World on Your Metrocard: Poland

Friday, September 26, 2014

In this week’s installment of our series Eating Around the World on a Metrocard, we go to the Nassau Avenue stop on the G train to the Polish restaurant Krolewskie Jadlo.
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Guest Picks: Hossein Amini

Thursday, September 25, 2014

Screenwriter and director Hossein Amini was on the Lopate show with Viggo Mortensen to talk about making the film "The Two Faces of January."
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