Streams

It's Not Your Imagination: This Allergy Season Really Is Worse

Friday, May 30, 2014

"Poorly controlled allergies have a negative impact on your love life,” says Dr. Clifford Bassett. And climate change is making it worse.

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The Story Behind Baseball's Ugliest Brawl

Thursday, May 29, 2014

One Sunday afternoon in August 1965, as baseball’s most storied rivals, the Giants and Dodgers, vied for the pennant, a fight broke out on the field. Giants pitcher Juan Marichal was at bat with Dodgers catcher John Roseboro behind the plate when their 14-minute brawl began. The fight immortalized by an iconic photo: Marichal’s bat poised to strike Roseboro’s head. But, as author John Rosengren explains, the brawl had roots in the racial prejudices against blacks and Latinos both men faced and surmounted.

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'Aladdin' on Broadway

Thursday, May 29, 2014

Tony-nominee James Monroe Iglehart, who plays Genie, and producer Thomas Schumacher talk about "Aladdin," the new musical comedy based on the animated Disney film.

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Guest Picks: Thomas Schumacher

Thursday, May 29, 2014

Producer Thomas Schumacher was on the Leonard Lopate Show recently to talk about bringing Aladdin to the Broadway stage. He also told us about his unusual pets!

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Guest Picks: James Monroe Iglehart

Thursday, May 29, 2014

James Monroe Iglehart was on the Leonard Lopate Show recently to talk about his Tony-nominated portrayal of Genie in the Broadway musical, "Aladdin." He also told us what he's a fan of!

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Saving South Sudan

Thursday, May 29, 2014

South Sudan, one of the world’s newest countries, is already in danger of becoming a failed state. A civil war, which erupted there in December 2013 shows little sign of abating. Robert Young Pelton traveled to South Sudan to search for rebel leader Dr. Riek Machar and ride along with the White Army in combat. His report "Saving South Sudan" filled the entire April issue of Vice magazine.

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Gold and War, Baseball's Brawl, Aladdin on Stage

Thursday, May 29, 2014

On today’s show: Kwasi Kwarteng tells the story of how our obsession with gold has long been intertwined with war. We take a look at how racial tensions spilled onto the baseball field in 1965, when Juan Marichal and John Roseboro fought during a game between the Giants and the Dodgers. James Monroe Iglehart talks about his Tony-nominated role as the Genie in “Aladdin,” along with by Thomas Schumacher, one of the musical’s producers.

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War and Gold

Thursday, May 29, 2014

The world has always been wild for gold. Gold became synonymous with financial dependability, and following the devastating chaos of World War I, the gold standard came to express the order of the free market system. Warfare in pursuit of wealth required borrowing, and when people lost confidence in the promissory notes and paper currencies issued during wartime, governments again turned to gold. In War and Gold: A Five-Hundred Year History of Empires, Adventures, and Debt, Kwasi Kwarteng exposes a pattern of war-waging and financial debt, from the French Revolution to the emergence of modern-day China.

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Guatnanamo Suicides Update

Thursday, May 29, 2014

On June 9, 2006 three inmates at Guantanamo Bay prison died sudden and violent deaths. The official report on the incidents classified them as suicides. In 2010, Harper’s contributing editor Scott Horton wrote an article ("The Guantanamo 'Suicides'") questioning the government’s narrative about the deaths. He talks about what new documents and testimony he has obtained can tell us about the deaths and a possible government cover-up.

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Guest Picks: Jan Glier Reeder

Wednesday, May 28, 2014

Jan Reeder, Consulting Curator for the Brooklyn Museum Costume Collection at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, discussed the exhibition "Charles James: Beyond Fashion" on May 28, 2014. She shared a few of her favorite things with us.

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Guest Picks: Harold Koda

Wednesday, May 28, 2014

Harold Koda, Curator in Charge of the Costume Institute at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, was here to talk about the exhibition "Charles James: Beyond Fashion." His Guest Picks reveal his wide range of interests.

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The Scientific Revolution of the Ball Gown

Wednesday, May 28, 2014

Although Charles James had no formal training, he is regarded as one of the greatest designers in America to have worked in the tradition of the Haute Couture. "Charles James: Beyond Fashion," on view at the Metropolitan Museum, examines the career of the legendary 20th-century Anglo-American couturier Charles James (1906–1978), who left London and arrived in New York City in 1940. His fascination with complex cut and seaming led to the creation of key design elements that he updated throughout his career: wrap-over trousers, figure-eight skirts, body-hugging sheaths, ribbon capes and dresses, spiral-cut garments, and poufs. These are showcased along with his iconic ball gowns from the late 1940s and early 1950s. Harold Koda, Curator in Charge of the Costume Institute, and Jan Reeder, Consulting Curator for the Brooklyn Museum Costume Collection at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, discuss the exhibition, on view through August 10, 2014.

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Word Maven Patricia T. O'Conner

Wednesday, May 28, 2014

Patricia T. O'Conner answers questions about language and grammar. An updated and expanded third edition of O’Conner’s book, Woe is I: The Grammarphobe's Guide to Better English in Plain English, is available in paperback, as is  Origins of the Specious, written with Stewart Kellerman.

Leave your questions about language and grammar!

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Lance Armstrong's 'Lieutenant' on Biking and Doping

Wednesday, May 28, 2014

George Hincapie — 17-time Tour de France participant, 5-time Olympian, and key witness in the Lance Armstrong doping case — talks about his career and a sports era defined by performance-enhancing drug use.

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Cycling, Doping, and Designing Dresses

Wednesday, May 28, 2014

American cyclist “Big George” Hincapie talks about competing in the Tour de France a record 17 times, cycling in the Olympics, and his role in the Lance Armstrong doping case. Con Coughlin discusses Winston Churchill’s early military career. Curators Harold Koda and Jan Reeder talk about the exhibit “Charles James: Beyond Fashion,” on show at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. And our “word maven” Patricia T. O’Conner takes your calls and questions about the idiosyncrasies of the English language.

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Churchill's First War

Wednesday, May 28, 2014

Over a century ago, a young cavalry lieutenant wrote a riveting account of what he saw during his first major campaign, a war against tribal insurgents on the North-West Frontier. Winston Churchill's The Story of the Malakand Field Force, published in 1898, made his reputation as a writer and as a soldier. More than 120 years later it is still required reading for military commanders on the ground, both British and American. Author and foreign correspondent Con Coughlin tells the story of that campaign in Churchill's First War, a vivid piece of military history that gives rare insight into both the 19th-century 'Great Game' and the 21 century conflict that has now raged longer than the Second World War.

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Video: Jane Austen and George Eliot Changed Adelle Waldman's Life

Tuesday, May 27, 2014

When Adelle Waldman was a guest on the Lopate Show to discuss her novel The Love Affairs of Nathaniel P. she talked about some favorite books and why Philip Roth's Sabbath's Theater blew her away.

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Don't Get Between Vladimir Putin and the Arctic

Tuesday, May 27, 2014

Masha Gessen reviews the case of the Arctic 30, a group of Greenpeace activists arrested (video below) and jailed by Russian president Vladimir Putin and charged with piracy. Gessen explains that it’s dangerous to antagonize Gazprom, the state’s energy monopoly, and even more dangerous to challenge Putin’s dream of a Russian Arctic. The Arctic 30 activists were released just before the Olympics began in Sochi, but Gessen writes that their experience was an education in the brutality and corruption of Russia’s prison system. Her article “Northern Exposure: Protest, Petroleum, and Putin’s Dream of a Russian Arctic” is in the June issue of Harper’s.

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'Eat, Pray, Love' for Depressed Shut-ins

Tuesday, May 27, 2014

Colson Whitehead discusses his search for meaning at high stakes poker tables. A longtime neighborhood poker player, Whitehead was given a $10,000 stake and an assignment from the online online magazine Grantland to see how far he could get in the World Series of Poker. After weeks of preparation he went to Las Vegas to try his luck in the multi-million dollar tournament. He’s written about his experience in The Noble Hustle: Poker, Beef Jerky, and Death, a funny social satire that Whitehead describes as “Eat, Pray, Love for depressed shut-ins.”

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Prison and Politics in Russia, Poker, and Poverty

Tuesday, May 27, 2014

Masha Gessen discusses the brutality and corruption of Russia’s prison system  and the case of the Arctic 30, a group of Greenpeace activists arrested and jailed by Vladimir Putin and charged with piracy. Adelle Waldman will be here for the Leonard Lopate Show Book Club! She’ll be talking about her novel The Love Affairs of Nathaniel P. Colson Whitehead tells us about playing in the World Series of Poker and what his experience at high-stakes card tables taught him about the human condition. Plus, economist William Easterly looks at the global effort to eradicate poverty, and argues that traditional approaches usually trample the rights and freedoms of the poor.

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