Streams

Debt and the Great Recession

Wednesday, June 04, 2014

The Great American Recession resulted in the loss of eight million jobs between 2007 and 2009, and more than four million homes were lost to foreclosures. Is it a coincidence that there was a dramatic rise in household debt in the years before the recession—that the total amount of debt for American households doubled between 2000 and 2007 to $14 trillion? Definitely not, says Atif Mian. In House of Debt: How They (and You) Caused the Great Recession, and How We Can Prevent It from Happening Again, Mian and co-author Amir Sufi explain how the Great Recession and Great Depression, as well as the current economic malaise in Europe, were caused by a large run-up in household debt followed by a large drop in household spending.

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China in Africa

Wednesday, June 04, 2014

China’s presence in Africa has been growing and it is shaping, and reshaping, the future of millions of people. Howard French, prizewinning foreign correspondent and former New York Times bureau chief in Shanghai and in West and Central Africa, talks about China’s economic, political, and human presence across the African continent. In China’s Second Continent, French crafts a layered investigation, looking at policy-shaping moguls and diplomats and the ordinary men and women navigating the street-level realities of cooperation, prejudice, corruption, and opportunity in Africa.

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Parenting: One More Thing To Be Competitive About

Tuesday, June 03, 2014

From sleep training to attachment parenting to breastfeeding, there are many ways to approach raising children—some methods work well for one family while they fail in another. Hillary Frank, host of the podcast The Longest Shortest Time, and Kate Bowman-Johnston explore parenting debates and whether it’s possible for moms to share their parenting triumphs without making each other feel bad.

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Sophie Okonedo and Anika Noni Rose in 'A Raisin in the Sun'

Tuesday, June 03, 2014

Academy Award-nominee Sophie Okonedo and Tony Award-winner Anika Noni Rose talk about their roles in Lorraine Hansberry’s “A Raisin in the Sun.” Originally produced in 1959, the play was the first written by an African American woman to be produced on Broadway, where it won the New York Drama Critics Circle Award for Best Play. Set on Chicago’s South Side, A Raisin in the Sun” revolves around the divergent dreams and conflicts within three generations of the Younger family. “A Raisin in the Sun” is playing at the Ethel Barrymore Theatre through June 15.

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Guest Picks: Anika Noni Rose

Tuesday, June 03, 2014

Anika Noni Rose was on the Leonard Lopate Show recently to talk about her Tony-nominated portrayal of Beneatha in the Broadway revival of "A Raisin in the Sun." She also told us that she loves to surf. Find out what else she's a fan of!

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Pink Slime is Making a Comeback

Tuesday, June 03, 2014

The market for finely textured beef—dubbed "pink slime"—had all but collapsed in 2012 after news reports revealed what it's made of, but this year's rising beef prices have brought back the demand for the inexpensive ingredient. The Wall Street Journal's Kelsey Gee co-wrote the article "Pink Slime Back in Favor as Prices Soar for U.S. Beef," and she talks about why food makers are returning to pink slime.

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John Wayne: the Life, the Legend

Tuesday, June 03, 2014

John Wayne was one of Hollywood’s most famous and most successful actors, but he was more than that. He became a symbol of America itself. Wayne projected dignity, integrity, and strength in all his films, even when his characters were flawed, and whatever character he played was always prepared to confront injustice in his own way. Scott Eyman discusses John Waye’s life and career. His new biography, John Wayne: The Life and Legend, traces Wayne’s life from his childhood to his stardom in Stagecoach and in some of his other greatest films, among them She Wore a Yellow Ribbon, The Quiet Man, and The Searchers.

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Fathers and Mothers on Adventures in Parenting

Tuesday, June 03, 2014

Brian Gresko and a panel of fathers talk about the terrifying and exhilarating challenge that is fatherhood. Then, Hillary Frank, who hosts the podcast “The Longest Shortest Time,” and Kate Bowman-Johnston discuss how to talk about your parenting successes without sounding competitive or condescending. Also Tony nominees Sophie Okonedo and Anika Noni Rose on starring in the new revival of “A Raisin in the Sun.” Plus Scott Eyman looks at the life of John Wayne, the actor who came to epitomize the Western film throughout his long, successful career.

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The Terror and Joy of Fatherhood

Tuesday, June 03, 2014

Becoming a father can be one of the most profoundly terrifying, exhilarating, life-changing occasions in a man’s life. Brian Gresko, editor of the essay collection When I First Held You, and contributors Lev Grossman and Matthew Specktor talk about fatherhood and how being a father changed the way they saw the world—and themselves.

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The Ultra-Rich Hijacking American Politics

Monday, June 02, 2014

Kenneth Vogel gives a tour of a new political world dramatically reordered by ever-larger flows of cash. Vogel talks about the secret gatherings of big-spending Republicans and Democrats alike—from California poolsides to DC hotel bars—to expose the way the mega-money men (and a few women) are dominating the new political landscape. His book Big Money: 2.5 Billion Dollars, One Suspicious Vehicle, and a Pimp—on the Trail of the Ultra-Rich Hijacking American Politics is about the multimillionaires and billionaires getting involved in politics, including casino magnate Sheldon Adelson, nouveau cowboy Foster Friess, Texas trial lawyer couple Amber and Steve Mostyn, Hollywood executive Jeffrey Katzenberg.

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The Final Days of the Soviet Union

Monday, June 02, 2014

The narrative that the disintegration of the Soviet Union and the end of the Cold War was linked to the triumph of democratic values over communism has persisted in American public discourse for decades, but prize-winning historian Serhii Plokhy shows that the collapse of the Soviet Union didn’t have much to do with the United States. In The Last Empire, Plokhy draws on recently declassified documents and interviews with key participants to present an account of the Soviet Union’s final months and argues that the key to the Soviet collapse was the inability of the two largest Soviet republics, Russia and Ukraine, to agree on the continuing existence of a unified state. He talks about the parallels between the countries then, and today.

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Guest Picks: Alisa Weilerstein

Monday, June 02, 2014

Alisa Weilerstein was on the Leonard Lopate Show recently to talk about her upcoming performance as part of the New York Philharmonic's Biennial. She also told us that she's a fan of Venezuelan baseball. Find out what else the cellist is a fan of! 

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Cellist Alisa Weilerstein

Monday, June 02, 2014

Cellist Alisa Weilerstein is widely recognized as one of the great classical musicians of her generation, and in 2011 she received a MacArthur "genius" grant. She discusses performing on June 6 at the New York Philharmonic’s Biennial, the orchestra’s contemporary music festival, where she will give the NY premiere of Mattias Pintscher’s Reflections on Narcissus.

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Then and Now: Ukraine and Russia, Money and Politics

Monday, June 02, 2014

On today’s show: Historian Serhii Plokhy argues that disagreements between Russia and Ukraine played a major role in the collapse of the Soviet Union. Cellist Alisa Weilerstein, who’s been called one of the greatest classical musicians of her generation, on playing at the New York Philharmonic’s Biennial. Smith Henderson talks about his latest novel, Fourth of July Creek. Kenneth Vogel tells how American politics came to be dominated by very rich people with rather outsized personalities.

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Smith Henderson's Novel Fourth of July Creek

Monday, June 02, 2014

PEN prize-winning writer Smith Henderson discusses his new novel,  Fourth of July Creek. After trying to help Benjamin Pearl, an undernourished, nearly feral 11-year-old boy living in the Montana wilderness, social worker Pete Snow comes face to face with the boy's profoundly disturbed father, Jeremiah, a paranoid survivalist waiting for the coming End Times.

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Sebastian Junger's 'Korengal'

Friday, May 30, 2014

Sebastian Junger discusses directing the new documentary "Korengal,” the follow up to the Oscar-nominated film “Restrepo,” which Junger co-directed with his late friend, Tim Hetherington. "Korengal” picks up where “Restrepo”  left off: the same valley, same men, but a very different look at the experience of war. The film was shot by Sebastian Junger and Tim Hetherington on location in Afghanistan’s Korengal valley and in Vicenza, Italy, at the unit base of the 2-503, Battle Company of the 173rd Airborne Brigade Combat Team. "Korengal” opens May 30 at Landmark Sunshine Cinemas.

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Guest Picks: Sebastian Junger

Friday, May 30, 2014

Author and filmmaker Sebastian Junger was on the Lopate Show May 30, 2014, to talk about his documentary "Korengal," about American soldiers fighting the war in Afghanistan. He relies on whiskey for comfort.

 

What have you read or seen over the past year that moved or surprised you?

     Thomas Paine, The Age of Reason

 

What are you listening to right now?

     Them Crooked Vultures

 

What’s the last great book you read?

     The Secular Conscience by Austin Pacey

 

What’s one thing you’re a fan of that people might not expect?

     Competitive distance running

 

What’s your favorite comfort food?

     Whiskey

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How to Keep Your Garden Green and Growing

Friday, May 30, 2014

Gerard Lordahl, Director of GrowNYC’s Open Space Greening Program, talks about summer gardening—what to plant and when to plant it—and answers questions about how to keep your gardens green and growing all summer long.

There's a fundraiser for the New York City Community Garden Coalition on July 10. Find out more here.

Leave a comment with your questions about gardening and caring for plants!

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Euphoria, a Novel Based on Margaret Mead's Life

Friday, May 30, 2014

Lily King discusses her new novel, Euphoria. It's about three young anthropologists of the1930s caught in a passionate love triangle that threatens their bonds, their careers, and, ultimately, their lives, and was inspired by events in the life of revolutionary anthropologist Margaret Mead.

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Nurturing Growth and Surviving War

Friday, May 30, 2014

Gerard Lordahl from GrowNYC will be sharing his tips on how to make your garden grow this summer. Then, Sebastian Junger talks about “Korengal.” It’s the follow-up to his Oscar-winning documentary “Restrepo,” a close look at the war in Afghanistan. Lily King discusses her new novel, Euphoria. And this week’s Please Explain is all about allergies and why so many people are feeling their effects these days.

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