Streams

Tracie Thoms and John Hawkes In A New Play About A Weekend Getaway Gone Awry

Friday, December 05, 2014

Tracie Thoms and John Hawkes star in the new play Lost Lake. Veronica (Thoms) desperately desires a peaceful getaway with her children, but the disheveled property owner (Hawkes) of the lakeside rental pulls Veronica into his own problems. Lost Lake is running at the Manhattan Theatre Club at New York City Center – Stage I, through December 21.

Read More

Comment

Nelson Mandela's Jailer, Who Grew to Become His Friend

Friday, December 05, 2014

When Christo Brand was 18, the South African Afrikaner was conscripted into the military. He chose to serve as a prison guard, rather than work as a soldier or policeman, and he was given charge of the country's most infamous inmate: Nelson Mandela. He remained Mandela’s guard for 12 years, and in that time, they formed a strong bond, which endured until Mandela’s death. Brand’s memoir is Mandela: My Prisoner, My Friend.

Read More

Comments [4]

Will New Nationwide Calorie Labeling Rules Change What You Eat?

Thursday, December 04, 2014

The FDA recently announced new nationwide calorie labeling rules for vending machines and chain restaurants. But, will the rules change how much Americans eat? Emily Oster, associate professor of economics at Brown University examined this question for FiveThirtyEight and found mixed results.

New York City was one of the first places in the country to require calorie posting. Have posted calorie counts in NYC restaurants changed your behavior? Tell us in the comments! 

Read More

Comments [16]

The First Space Capsule Since Apollo to Send An Astronaut Beyond Low Earth Orbit is Delayed. Will It Launch?

Thursday, December 04, 2014

The Orion space capsule is NASA’s first attempt to send an astronaut capsule beyond low Earth orbit since the Apollo program. Today’s launch of an unmanned Orion capsule has been delayed, and the program has also faced tough budget constraints. Kenneth Chang, science reporter for the New York Times, discusses Orion, and the new face of NASA's space program.

Read More

Comments [3]

Tribute: P.D. James

Thursday, December 04, 2014

P.D. James was one of the first notable writers who came on the show. She was known as “the Queen of Crime” for her amazing detective mysteries featuring Scotland Yard’s Adam Dalgliesh – who was, as she said, “something more than just a policeman.” She added, “I could never fall in love with a man who was handsome but stupid.”  She published her first novel at the age of 42, after spending three years writing in the early mornings before going to work at a hospital. Her dystopian novel, Children of Men would be made into a film of the same name by Alfonso Cuaron.  Phyllis Dorothy James White would become Baroness James of Holland Park. She died at the age of 94. But you can still hear a number of her interviews with Leonard here.

Read More

Comment

Post-war Brooklyn Heights Comes Alive in the Novel When the World Was Young

Thursday, December 04, 2014

In Elizabeth Gaffney’s new novel, When the World Was Young, postwar Brooklyn comes alive through the character of Wally Baker, a young girl whose love of Wonder Woman comics and ants, and hatred of dresses, needlepoint, and manners, makes her feel like an outcast in the shadow of her dazzling but unstable mother. 

Read More

Comments [2]

Is a Tampa Homeless Program Exploiting Residents, Or Providing Opportunities?

Thursday, December 04, 2014

William Hobson, Staff Writer at the Tampa Bay Times, discusses his November 29 story, “Tampa homeless program uses unpaid, destitute residents as steady labor force, revenue source.” New Beginnings of Tampa, one of the city's largest homeless programs, sends crews of unpaid men to work concessions in sports arenas, as well as work in construction, landscaping, telemarketing, moving, painting, even grant-writing. The CEO of New Beginnings is applying  to run the county’s new homeless shelter, but there are questions about how much the program is charging the state, and charging the vulnerable men who live there and work without pay. 

Read More

Comments [4]

Irina Baronova, Child Star, Leads the Troupe that Introduces Ballet to the United States

Thursday, December 04, 2014

English film and television star Victoria Tennant tells us about the rise of modern ballet in the United States. In her new book, Irina Baronova and the Ballets Russes de Monte Carlo, Tennant recounts the life story of her mother, Irina Baronova, one of ballet’s most glamorous stars. Baronova fled Russia with her family during the Revolution, and at the age of thirteen, became a star in Paris, joining the Ballets Russes de Monte Carlo —a group that toured the United States and the world, introducing many to ballet as an art form.

Read More

Comment

Exploiting the Homeless and Exploring Calorie Counts

Thursday, December 04, 2014

William Hobson, Tampa Bay Times Staff Reporter, investigates exploitation in a homeless program. Victoria Tennant talks about the rise of modern ballet in the United States. Elizabeth Gaffney’s new novel, When the World Was Young. An economist analyzes the FDA's new ruling on mandatory calorie counts for vending machines and chain restaurants.

Read More

Are Museums The Best Place to Appreciate Art? Ask The Director of the Met.

Wednesday, December 03, 2014

Philippe de Montebello, the longest-serving director of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in its history, discusses how and why we look at art. In his new book, Rendez-vous with Art, he reflects on the importance of museums, but wonders if they might be the worst possible places to look at art. 

Read More

Comments [11]

Recipe: Libby O'Connell's Firehouse Chili Con Carne

Wednesday, December 03, 2014

A recipe straight from Lieutenant Bryan Gomoka and the team of firefighters that make up Company 33 and Ladder Company 9 that reside on New York City's Great Jones Street.
Read More

Comment

The History of Grilled Beaver Tail, And Other Early American Delicacies

Wednesday, December 03, 2014

What we choose to eat every day, and the basis for our national tastes, goes far beyond our palate. Dr. Libby H. O'Connell discusses how economics, technology, and social movements have changed our tastes dramatically. Her new book, The American Plate: A Culinary History in 100 Bites traces the history of foods ranging from blueberries and bagels to peanut butter, hard cider, and Cracker Jack, revealing the hidden history behind the everyday foods that fill our grocery carts. 

Read More

Comments [8]

Recipe: Libby O'Connell's Colonial Syllabub

Wednesday, December 03, 2014

A fashionable, frothy drink comprised of whipped cream, sugar, and wine or brandy enjoyed by colonial Americans in the 1760s.
Read More

Comment

Recipe: Libby O'Connell's Ginger Carrot Soup

Wednesday, December 03, 2014

According to culinary historian Dr. Libby O'Connell, ginger carrot soup gained popularity in the late 1980s and 1990s, appearing on menus across the country. 
Read More

Comment

The Peaceful Philosophy of Leo Strauss, Who Inspired Iraq War Neocons

Wednesday, December 03, 2014

Leo Strauss was known as a man who inspired hawkish views on national security—he inspired neoconservative champions of the Iraq War William Kristol and John Podhoretz. Yet Robert Howse argues that we might have Strauss pegged all wrong. In Leo Strauss: Man of Peace, Robert Howse analyzes Strauss’s writings on political violence, concluding that Strauss favored international law, was skeptical of imperialism, and was critical of radical ideologies.

Read More

Comments [4]

Over 40% of New York City Households Struggle to Make Ends Meet

Wednesday, December 03, 2014

On December 2, 2014, United Way of New York City published a new study called the 2014 Self-Sufficiency Standard Report, about what it truly means to be able to survive and support yourself living in this city. Released in coordination with City Harvest and the Women's Center for Education and Career Advancement, the report reveals that 42% of people are living below the self-sufficiency standard - that's 2 out of 5 households, or nearly 2.7 million people. Whereas the federal poverty threshold in 2014 for a two-person family was $15,730, this report finds that in New York City's least expensive neighborhood to live in, that same family would need to make $52,776 to live bare-bones and be self-sufficient. Merble Reagon, Executive Director, Women's Center for Education and Career Advancement, Nicole Gallant, Senior Vice President for Community Impact, United Way of New York City, and Jennifer McLean, Vice President, Community Impact, City Harvest, will join us to discuss the report.

Read More

Comments [5]

Surviving in New York City, The Food That Defines America

Wednesday, December 03, 2014

The United Way of New York City's new report on self-sufficiency in New York City. Libby O'Connell on the culinary history of America. Robert Howse on Leo Strauss. Philippe de Montebello, the longest-serving director of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, on the importance of museums. 

Read More

New York's Historic Neighborhoods Are Still At Risk for Overdevelopment

Tuesday, December 02, 2014

Many New Yorkers assume that historic neighborhoods like Greenwich Village are protected from overdevelopment, but outdated zoning laws and less than comprehensive historic district designations allow for grossly out of scale new construction in some of our city’s most treasured neighborhoods. We'll look at what the regulations actually say, why they seem to be so easy to get around, and what can be done to protect the historic character of these neighborhoods. Andrew Berman, executive director of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, will join Michael Kimmelman, architecture critic of The New York Times.

Read More

Comments [17]

Combining Modern Technology, Political Savvy, and Terror, The Islamic State Grows

Tuesday, December 02, 2014

World-renowned terrorism expert Loretta Napoleoni discusses the massive enterprise known as ISIS or The Islamic State, as much a political entity as a terrorist group. ISIS has redrawn national borders across the Middle East and subjugated an area larger than the United Kingdom to its own vicious brand of Sharia law. In The Islamist Phoenix: The Islamic State and the Redrawing of the Middle East, Napoleoni argues that Western media misunderstands ISIS, ignoring their new model for nation building and their keen understanding of Middle Eastern politics. 

Read More

Comments [11]

From a Queens Townhouse to a 350-Square-Foot Apartment in Greenwich Village

Tuesday, December 02, 2014

William Powers embraced the minimalist lifestyle in North Carolina, spending a season in a 12-foot-by-12-foot cabin off the grid. After moving to a Queens townhouse, he got the itch to shrink his surroundings once more. Powers and his wife jettisoned 80 percent of their stuff and moved into a 350-square-foot "micro-apartment" in Greenwich Village. He began working a two-day workweek, and exploring the Slow Food and Slow Money Movements. He writes about his experiences in New Slow City: Living Simply in the World's Fastest City.

Read More

Comments [9]