Streams

Clare Boothe Luce, Mover and Shaker

Monday, July 14, 2014

Clare Boothe Luce arrived on Capitol Hill in January 1943 as a newly elected Republican from Connecticut. She was also a prolific journalist and magnetic public speaker, as well as a playwright, screenwriter, scuba diver, early experimenter in psychedelic drugs, and grande dame of the GOP in the Reagan era. Sylvia Jukes Morris discusses the final volume of her biography of Luce, which looks at her roles in the Nixon, Ford, and Reagan administrations. Price of Fame: The Honorable Clare Boothe Luce reveals Luce's wide sphere of influence, and looks at her friendships with Winston Churchill, Somerset Maugham, John F. Kennedy, Salvador Dalí, Richard Nixon, Ronald Reagan, and others.

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Race, Class and Schools

Monday, July 14, 2014

On today’s show we’ll explore the re-emergence of school segregation 60 years after the Supreme Court ruling in Brown v. Board of Education. Sylvia Jukes Morris talks about the influence of politician and playwright Clare Boothe Luce. We'll find out about a legal battle over a Navy submarine detection system that uses high-intensity underwater sound—and drives whales to strand themselves on beaches. And, why golf is catching on in China and how it’s changing Chinese culture.

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Race, Class, and School Segregation 60 years after Brown v. Board of Education

Monday, July 14, 2014

Frontline co-producers Mary Robertson and Kyle Spencer discuss education, race and class 60 years after the Supreme Court ruled in Brown v. Board of Education that racial segregation in the education system was unconstitutional. Their two-part Frontline series includes "Separate but Equal" and "Omarina's Story" looks at the reemergence of school segregation across the country and airs July 15 on PBS.

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Rob Reiner: ‘I Tell the Same Story Over and Over’

Friday, July 11, 2014

Rob Reiner discusses his new film "And So It Goes," which stars Michael Douglas and Diane Keaton. Douglas plays a realtor who’s willfully obnoxious to anyone who might cross his path. He just wants to sell one last house and retire in peace and quiet—but his estranged son suddenly drops off a granddaughter he never knew existed and she turns his life upside-down. “And So It Goes” opens July 25.

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'Land Ho!' Searching for Lobster, Vodka, and Long-Legged Women in Iceland

Friday, July 11, 2014

Director Aaron Katz talks about his film “Land Ho!” along with stars Paul Eenhoorn and Earl Lynn Nelson. Feeling disenchanted with life after retirement, a brassy former surgeon convinces his mild-mannered ex-brother-in-law to take a trip with him to Iceland. The 60-something pair set off in an attempt to reclaim their youth in Reykjavík, but they discover that you can’t escape yourself, no matter how far you travel. “Land Ho” opens July 11 at the Lincoln Plaza and Angelika theaters.

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How to Use Airbnb Without Getting Evicted

Friday, July 11, 2014

Airbnb, which allows people to rent out a room or home online, has turned into a worldwide hospitality industry, with 600,000 listings in 34,000 cities and 190 countries. It’s a growing presence in New York City, but many politicians claim that the majority of Airbnb’s business here is illegal. New York State Senator Liz Krueger explains what is legal—and illegal—about using Airbnb in NYC, what the company is doing to try to change laws in Albany, and how that will affect landlords and tenants in the future.

When is hosting on Airbnb illegal? It is not illegal to host on Airbnb if you own a single family home or two family home, or rent out a room in your apartment while you stay there. But if you live in a permanent residential apartment building and rent out your entire apartment for less than thirty days, you are breaking the law. "And that’s the vast majority, we think, of listers on Airbnb,” Krueger said. “I can’t find a lease or bylaw in the city of New York that allows you to do short term subletting without permission from your board or your landlord. It violates state law… it violates zoning ordinances, it violates tax law.”

“Thousands of models” are removed from residential use as a result of short term rentals, Krueger said. “People go and rent [up to] 25 units, and just become entrepreneurial illegal hotellers,… Every single one of those units is being taken off the market for people desperately trying to find affordable housing.”

Hosting on Airbnb could lead to a rise in evictions for renters who might not know that they are breaking the law and their lease. “We have begged AirBNB and the other companies: put the laws up on the website,” Krueger said. “You have a legal obligation to let people know what they might be walking into.”

Neighbors are also affected. Krueger gives an example of a typical complaint: an elderly woman who knows everyone in the building, who tells Krueger: “now people I don’t know have keys to the building. They’re in my elevators. They’re partying late at night. I’m scared. There’s no one to complain to when things go wrong, because the person who’s supposed to be in that apartment isn’t.”

What are other affordable options for people who want to visit New York City? “I am hoping that the city, and this administration, will take seriously the proposal to create for-profit hostels,” Krueger said. “We actually have a law that doesn’t allow hostels, which are all over Europe and all over the country, which offer a safe hotel model at a lower cost.”

But some listeners were skeptical that housing laws are being enforced equally. Andrew from Brooklyn called in to say that landlords violate city law all the time and rarely get penalized, but the city is cracking down on Airbnb hosts. “I’m very suspicious how much this is being driven by the hotel industry, and politicians are taking the hotel money and doing their bidding.”

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After 12 Years of Filming, an Entire Childhood on Screen

Friday, July 11, 2014

Director Richard Linklater talks about his varied career, and his new film "Boyhood," with star Ellar Coltrane. The film was shot intermittently over a 12-year period with the same cast—which includes Ethan Hawke and Patricia Arquette—and tells the story of growing up through the eyes of a child named Mason. “Boyhood” opens July 11 in New York and Los Angeles.

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Screen Time: Rob Reiner and Richard Linklater

Friday, July 11, 2014

Rob Reiner talks about his latest romantic comedy, “And So It Goes.” Richard Linklater, director of “Boyhood,” and Ellar Coltrane, who stars in the film, talk about creating this film over the course of 12 years. We’ll talk to the director and stars of “Land Ho!” about a road trip that takes an elderly odd couple to Reykjavik. Plus, Please Explain is all about subletting, AirBNB, and the rules and rights of tenants.

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Guest Picks: Lee Grant

Thursday, July 10, 2014

Actress Lee Grant was on the Lopate Show on July 10, 2014, to discuss her life and her memoir, I Said Yes to Everything. She shared a few of her favorite things with us.

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Land of Love and Drowning, a Novel by Tiphanie Yanique

Thursday, July 10, 2014

Tiphanie Yanique talks about her new novel Land of Love and Drowning. Chronicling three generations of an island family from 1916 to the 1970s, it’s a story of love and magic, set against the emergence of Saint Thomas into the modern world.

 

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A Hidden World and a Public Hollywood Life

Thursday, July 10, 2014

On today’s show: We’ll find out about the hidden world of illegal trading in human organs. Academy Award-winning actress Lee Grant talks about her career on the stage and screen and her new memoir. Tiphanie Yanique tells us about her new novel, Land of Love and Drowning. And we’ll look at the American Dream Megamall, a stalled multibillion dollar redevelopment project in the New Jersey Meadowlands, which may be shaping up to be another scandal for Governor Christie.

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A Brief History (and Spirited Defense) of Spam

Thursday, July 10, 2014

Spam is the most processed of processed meats. Mention it and you're bound to get an intense reaction: from yelps of revulsion, to cries of genuine affection and yes, even ironic appreciation. Erin DeJesus, editor of Eater Portland and a news editor at Eater National broke down Spam's history, explained why it became popular in many Asian cultures and defended the canned meat from its many detractors. She asked "Why is there a foreignness or otherness to Spam? Why is it maybe less American, or more maligned than something like a hot dog?" 

Her article is called “A Brief History of Spam.”

 

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Lee Grant: 'I Said Yes to Everything'

Thursday, July 10, 2014

Actress Lee Grant was born Lyova Haskell Rosenthal in New York City and spent her youth accumulating more experiences than most people have in a lifetime. She was a celebrated Broadway star and a Vogue “It Girl,” and was nominated for an Academy Award at 24. But then, she wound up on the Hollywood black list and had to fight to re-establish her career. Her memoir I Said Yes to Everything is set amid the New York theater scene of the 1950s and the star-studded parties of Malibu in the 1970s, and it tells Lee Grant’s personal story of political passion and Hollywood glamour.

 

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The Hidden Global Market for Human Organs

Thursday, July 10, 2014

University of California-Berkeley anthropologist Nancy Scheper-Hughes has spent her career tracking and fighting the illegal trade in human organs. Scheper-Hughes, co-founder and director of Organs Watch and an adviser to the World Health Organization, has visited African and South American dialysis units, organ banks, police morgues, and hospitals, investigating this black market. Ethan Watters talks about the hidden global market in human flesh and about Scheper-Hughes’s work tracking and fighting it. He’s author of the article "The Organ Detective" in the July/August issue of Pacific Standard magazine.

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Chris Christie and the American Dream Megamall

Thursday, July 10, 2014

The American Dream Megamall—formerly known as Xanadu—is a stalled and bankrupt multibillion-dollar redevelopment project in the New Jersey Meadowlands. Nation reporters Bob Dreyfuss and Barbara Dreyfuss discuss the role of New Jersey governor Chris Christie and his top aides in jump-starting the project. Their two part investigation has found that the American Dream Megamall saga “could be the latest, and biggest, conflict of interest scandal in the tangle of scandals plaguing the New Jersey Governor.” They've written about it for The Nation's Christie Watch project.

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Nobody Is Ever Missing, a Novel

Wednesday, July 09, 2014

Catherine Lacey talks about her novel Nobody Is Ever Missing, about a young woman who takes a one-way flight to New Zealand, abruptly leaving her stable but unfulfilling life in Manhattan. As her husband scrambles to figure out what happened to her, she sets off on an adventure—hitchhiking, being swept into the lives of strangers, and sleeping in fields, forests, and public parks.

 

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How to Eat Meat without Destroying the World

Wednesday, July 09, 2014

Patrick Martins argues that humans have evolved to eat meat. But, given the destructive forces of the fast-food industry and factory farming, we need to make smart, informed choices about the food we eat and where it comes from. In The Carnivore’s Manifesto: Eating Well, Eating Responsibly, and Eating Meat Martins, of Heritage Food USA and founder of Slow Food USA and Heritage Radio, outlines realistic steps everyone can take to be part of the sustainable-food movement.

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Common Core Confusion

Wednesday, July 09, 2014

The Common Core, a set of tougher academic standards, is the most significant change to public education in decades. New York Times reporter Javier C. Hernandez talks about the new standards and how they’re affecting students. His article “Common Core, in 9-Year-Old-Eyes” explores how the confusion of Common Core standards placed Chrispin Alcindor, a model student, at the bottom of his class. Hernandez will be joined by Alcindor’s teacher, Trisha Matthew.

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The True Diary of a Teenage Girl

Wednesday, July 09, 2014

Between the ages of 15 and 18, until her death in 1999 of cystic fibrosis, a Pennsylvania teenager named Mary Rose wrote unguardedly in her journals, describing her fights with her mother, a magnet for abusive, criminal boyfriends; her own experiences with romance, sex, alcohol, and drugs; and living with cystic fibrosis. Gillian McCain discusses creating the book Dear Nobody: The True Diary of Mary Rose from diary entries and letters, edited with Legs McNeil. She’s joined by Mary Rose’s mother.  

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The Common Core and the Responsible Carnivore

Wednesday, July 09, 2014

New York Times reporter Javier Hernandez and teacher Trisha Matthew discuss the confusion being created by the Common Core standards in schools. We’ll take a look at the compelling diary written by a Pennsylvania teenager who suffered from cystic fibrosis. Catherine Lacey on her novel Nobody Is Ever Missing. Patrick Martins, founder of Heritage Foods USA and Slow Food USA, on how carnivores can eat ethically and responsibly.

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