Streams

Recent Episodes and Articles

Latest Episode / Tuesday, July 29, 2014 Edit This

Entanglements in Iraq and Afghanistan

On today’s show: Sean Hemingway talks about his grandfather Ernest Hemingway’s novel The Sun Also Rises for the Leonard Lopate Show Book Club! CIA and National Security Council veteran Bruce Riedel tells the story of America's secret war in Afghanistan in the 1980s. Maggie Gyllenhaal tells us about her role in the new SundanceTV miniseries “The Honorable Woman,”  a drama about the volatile politics of the Middle East. Michael Kirk discusses his Frontline documentary, “Losing Iraq,” which traces the role the United States has played from the 2003 invasion to the current violence—exploring how and why Iraq is now coming undone.

Segments and Articles

Maggie Gyllenhaal's New Role Blends the Personal and Political

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Maggie Gyllenhaal discusses her role in the new SundanceTV miniseries “The Honorable Woman,”  about Nessa Stein, whose father was a Zionist arms procurer who was assassinated. Years later, after inheriting her father’s company, Nessa changes its purpose from supplying arms to laying data cabling networks between Israel and the West Bank, promoting peace and communication. Her work earns her an appointment to the House of Lords. When a secret from her past threatens to be exposed, she realizes that those closest to her are potentially her most dangerous enemies. “The Honorable Woman” premieres July 31 at 10 pm on SundanceTV.

Read More

Comments [2]

Seán Hemingway on The Sun Also Rises

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Ernest Hemingway's first novel, The Sun Also Rises, is the quintessential story of the Lost Generation. The story follows Lady Brett Ashley and Jake Barnes and their carousing friends from the nightclubs of 1920s Paris to the bull fights in Spain. It looks at the disillusionment of the post-World War I generation,  but, at its heart, the novel is about unrequited love. Ernest Hemingway’s grandson, Seán Hemingway, will be here to discuss a new edition of the novel—and the early drafts and notes that show the author’s process. Leave your questions for him by leaving a comment, below!

Read More

Comments [8]

America's Secret War Against the Soviets in Afghanistan

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

CIA and National Security Council veteran Bruce Riedel tells the story of America's secret war in Afghanistan and the defeat of the Soviet 40th Red Army in the war that proved to be the final battle of the Cold War. In What We Won: America's Secret War in Afghanistan, 1979-89, he writes of his experiences in the CIA's Operations Center when the Soviet Union invaded Afghanistan on Christmas Eve 1979, and examines the United States’ response, initiated by Jimmy Carter and accelerated by Ronald Reagan.

Read More

Comments [4]

America’s Role in the Unfolding Chaos in Iraq

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Two-and-a-half years after the U.S. pulled all its troops out of Iraq—a conflict that is projected to cost America more than $2 trillion dollars—Iraq is once again in crisis, with Islamic extremists gaining ground and a civil war brewing. Michael Kirk talks about the situation, and traces the role of the United States in the country since the 2003 invasion. His new Frontline documentary, "Losing Iraq,"  premieres July 29 at 10 pm on PBS.

 

Read More

Comments [4]

All About TLDR – the Internet, Shorter

Monday, July 28, 2014

PJ Vogt and Alex Goldman talk about On The Media’s TLDR podcast and blog and the kind of media issues it covers.

 

Read More

Comments [4]

The Spy Who Infiltrated NY’s Nazi Underground

Monday, July 28, 2014

From the time Adolf Hitler came into power in 1933, German spies were active in New York. As war began in Europe in 1939, a German-American was recruited by the Nazis to set up a radio transmitter and collect messages from spies to send back to Nazi spymasters. Peter Duffy tells us how this German-American, William G. Sebold, became the FBI’s first double agent, spearheading a covert mission to infiltrate New York’s Nazi underground in the days leading up to World War II—it was the most successful counterespionage operation in U.S. history. Duffy tells the story in his book, Double Agent: The First Hero of World War II and How the FBI Outwitted and Destroyed a Nazi Spy Ring. .

Read More

Comments [6]

Guest Picks: Alex Goldman

Monday, July 28, 2014

Alex Goldman and PJ Vogt from TLDR were on the show July 28, 2014 to talk about internet culture and the influence of social media. Alex Goldman is a fan of Peter Tosh. Find out what else he's a fan of!

Read More

Comment

Guest Picks: PJ Vogt

Monday, July 28, 2014

PJ Vogt and Alex Goldman from TLDR were on the show July 28, 2014 to talk about internet culture and the influence of social media. PJ Vogt is a fan of apocalyptic detective fiction. Find out what else he's a fan of!

Read More

Comment

Why Are So Many Americans Going Hungry?

Monday, July 28, 2014

One-sixth of people in the United States are food insecure. Tracie McMillan looks at the face of hunger in this country and why millions of working Americans are struggling to feed their families. She’s written the article “The New Face of Hunger,” in the August issue of National Geographic. It's part of National Geographic’s eight-month series The Future of Food: How to Feed Our Growing Planet, on issues of food security and sustainability and an examination of why people in the richest country on Earth are malnourished.

 

Read More

Comments [13]

Looking Back at the Crash of United Flight 232

Monday, July 28, 2014

Twenty five years ago, United Airlines Flight 232 slammed onto a runway in Iowa and burst into flames. Miraculously, 184 of 296 passengers lived. Laurence Gonzales, a commercial pilot, draws on interviews with hundreds of survivors, crew, and airport and rescue personnel, to tell the harrowing story of pilots flying a plane with no controls and flight attendants keeping their calm in the face of certain death. His book Flight 232: A Story of Disaster and Survival goes step by step through the research that reveals the flaw, smaller than a grain of rice, that brought down the aircraft.

Read More

Comments [5]

Hunger in the World's Wealthiest Nation

Monday, July 28, 2014

Tracie McMillan looks at the face of hunger in this country and why millions of working Americans are struggling to feed their families. PJ Vogt and Alex Goldman of On The Media’s TLDR podcast stop by. We’ll find out about a covert mission to infiltrate New York’s Nazi underground in the days leading up to World War II. And pilot Laurence Gonzales tells the harrowing story of United Airlines Flight 232, which crashed on a runway in Iowa 25 years ago—amazingly, more than half of the people on board survived.

Read More

What the Sun Does to Your Skin

Friday, July 25, 2014

This week's Please Explain is all about how exposure to the sun affects our skin--from tanning to sunburn, from freckles to skin cancers. Dr. Jennifer Stein, of NYU Langone Medical Center's Ronald O. Perelman Department of Dermatology, talks about UV rays, sunscreen, and the cell damage that exposure to the sun causes over time.

 

Read More

Comments [33]

Why the Cost of Vaccines Is Soaring

Friday, July 25, 2014

The cost of vaccines has gone from single digits to sometimes triple digits in the last two decades, creating dilemmas for doctors and patients and straining public health budgets. Some doctors have even stopped offering immunizations because they say they cannot afford them to because insurers often reimburse poorly. Elisabeth Rosenthal talks about the situation. Her article in the July 2 edition of The New York Times, “The Price of Prevention: Vaccine Costs Are Soaring,” is part of her ongoing series “Paying Till It Hurts.”

There's also a Facebook group for this series. You can join at https://www.facebook.com/groups/payingtillithurts/.

Read More

Comments [13]

The Family Behind the East Indian Music Academy in Queens

Friday, July 25, 2014

Music teachers Ravideen Ramsamooj, his wife, Bharati Ramsamooj, and son Avi Ramsamooj, talk about founding the East Indian Music Academy, a not-for-profit school that promotes Indian culture and spiritual awareness through music, language, and other art forms, and has played an important role in the Indo-Caribbean community in New York City.

Read More

Comment

Shedding Light

Friday, July 25, 2014

New York Times reporter Elisabeth Rosenthal looks at why vaccines are getting more expensive. Filmmaker Dan Krauss tells the story of Specialist Adam Winfield, an infantryman in Afghanistan who tried to alert the military to serious war crimes being committed by members of his platoon. We’ll talk to a family that founded an East-Indian music Academy in Queens that’s taught over 7,000 students. Plus, Please Explain looks at sunburn and all the other ways the sun can damage skin—and how to protect it!

Read More

What Happened When a Soldier Tried to Report War Crimes in Afghanistan

Friday, July 25, 2014

Private Adam Winfield was a 21-year-old soldier in Afghanistan when he attempted, with the help of his father, to alert the military to war crimes his platoon was committing. But Winfield's pleas went unheeded. Filmmaker Dan Krauss tells the story in his documentary “The Kill Team,” looks at the devastating moral tensions soldiers' are forced to cope with. “The Kill Team” opens July 25 at the Film Society of Lincoln Center's Elinore Bunin Munroe Film Center.

 

Read More

Comments [2]

Is a Hot Dog a Sandwich?

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Dan Pashman, host of The Sporkful, dives into the heated debate over whether hot dogs are sandwiches. He’ll also talk about the finer points of both foods—his trip to Hot Doug’s in Chicago and the engineering that goes into what making a great sandwich.

Dan Pashman is hosting a Twitter chat about sandwiches at 1:30 pm on July 24. His Twitter handle is @TheSporkful. To join in, use #notasandwich.

Read More

Comments [13]

An Iraq War Vet Returns to Find Baghdad on the Edge of Ruin

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Roy Scranton served in the United States Army in Iraq 2003. He returns to Baghdad 10 years later as sectarian violence and chaos threaten to overtake the country and after ISIS has taken Fallujah, Mosul, and other cities. Scranton reflects on his time in there a decade ago, the role of the U.S. in securing Iraq, and what’s happened in the country since. His article “Back to Baghdad: Life in the City of Doom” in the July 31 issue of Rolling Stone.

 

Read More

Comments [7]

Fighting Corruption in India's Unruly Democracy

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Simon Denyer, former Indian bureau chief for the Washington Post, looks at the characters that are agitating for change in India. He discusses the country's most troublesome issues—from corruption to populist politics, from gender relations to education, analyzes the India's economic malaise, its growing middle class, and its politics. In Rogue Elephant: Harnessing the Power of India's Unruly Democracy Denyer explores the battle between the deep-rooted system of graft and patronage and the forces demanding change and supporting democracy.

Read More

Comments [3]

Past and Present: In India, Italy and Iraq

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Simon Denyer, former Indian bureau chief for the Washington Post, looks at corruption, the expanding middle class, and the people who are shaping democracy and politics in India. Joseph Luzzi talks about Italy’s passion for art, food, and family, and the country’s north-south divide, and why Italian Americans have a complicated relationship with the “old country.” The Sporkful’s Dan Pashman and Leonard debate whether a hot dog is a sandwich. Roy Scranton, a veteran who served in Iraq in 2003, on returning to Baghdad and the state of that country 10 years later.  

Read More