Streams

Who Owns That Joke?

Tuesday, September 23, 2014

Comedian Carlos Mencia is notorious for stealing other comics’ jokes. But he’s never been sued—in fact, there are almost no lawsuits in comedy. On this episode of Life of the Law, what the law means to comics, and what they do when it can’t help them.

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Abuse, Abduction and International Law

Monday, September 08, 2014

What happens when one parent takes a child across international borders without the other parent’s permission? In 1980, the United States and international partners created a treaty that lays out the rules for what federal officials are supposed to do ...

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Two Sides of a River

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Sometimes what’s considered as socially acceptable behavior can also be technically unlawful. Reporter Jason Albert follows one city as it grapples with how to enforce laws in a public park without unnecessarily restricting public use.

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One Reporter on California’s Death Row

Thursday, July 17, 2014

What do we really know about death row in California? When we don’t know we create, we imagine.

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Jailhouse Lawyers

Tuesday, July 08, 2014

In California, there are hundreds if not thousands of people practicing criminal law though they’ve never passed a bar exam. They don’t wear suits. They don’t have secretaries. And they can’t bill for their time. They’re called Jailhouse Lawyers.

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Jury Nullification

Tuesday, June 24, 2014

Though jurors are sworn to uphold the law during their deliberation, they still have the power to decide that a defendant is innocent even when all signs point to their guilt. Prosecutor Paul Butler traces the ways this hidden process was a boon for ab...

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The Right To Beg

Tuesday, June 10, 2014

Standing in the empty parking lot of a Subway store in Springfield, Illinois, Don Norton unfolds a ragged cardboard poster and holds it just below his chest. The sign, which reads, ‘Please help any way you can,

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The Necessity Defense

Tuesday, May 20, 2014

It’s odd to think cannibals, cannabis-growers, Vietnam War protesters, and prison escapees all have something in common. But they do: the necessity defense. We explore the origins and uses of this rare long-shot defense argument, which says in essence,

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The Hardest Time: Moms in Prison

Tuesday, May 06, 2014

Mother’s Day is the one day of the year we set aside to honor mothers. Some do it with flowers and cards. For women who are in prison and their children who are being raised by grandmothers, aunts or guardians on the outside,

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Privacy Issues

Tuesday, April 22, 2014

You’re driving your car down a street and as you pass, a camera takes a photo of your license plate. Who is taking the photo and what are they doing with the information? Reporter Cyrus Farivar has our story.

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People and Their Taxes

Tuesday, April 08, 2014

It’s April and that means two things: spring and tax time! The US tax system is really, really complicated. Every time you do your taxes, you’re answering to multiple jurisdictions –– and all their laws about what you owe for what, and why.

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Trouble with Profiling

Tuesday, March 25, 2014

Is ‘looking Mexican’ a legal reason for the Border Patrol to stop a car? Federal law says agents have to have ‘reasonable suspicion’ that something illegal is happening. But what that means depends where you are, and whom you ask.

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Best Of Live Law 3

Tuesday, March 11, 2014

What's love got to do with the law? Then again, what's the law got to do with falling in love? From coast to coast, Life of the Law occasionally takes to the stage with LIVE LAW to present true, first-person stories about how the law shapes and tran...

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Bad Constitution

Tuesday, February 25, 2014

With more than 300,000 words and over 800 amendments, Alabama’s Constitution is 40 times longer than the US Constitution, and holds the record for being the longest active constitution in the world. Originally written in 1901 by men seeking to establis...

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Polyamorous Love

Friday, February 14, 2014

Diana Adams believes the family law system is at least 20 years behind cultural changes. She helps non-traditional families—such as three people in love—find a simulacrum of the protection offered by legal marriage.

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School Discipline

Tuesday, January 28, 2014

Thousands of kids are arrested in school every year. About a third of U.S. schools have a regular police presence on campus; some school districts even have their own police forces. As the number of law enforcement officers on campus has gone up, so,

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Release Day

Wednesday, January 15, 2014

For eighteen years, California’s three strikes law leveled harsh penalties against repeat felons: anyone with two felony convictions received 25 years to life for committing a third felony. In 2012, Californians voted to change the three strikes law,

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Dibs!

Tuesday, January 07, 2014

With all the snow in the US, we thought we'd bring back an old episode: Dibs. Sit back, stay warm, and listen to an old episode from Life of the Law. - After a big snowstorm, the streets of many northern cities start to get cluttered with furniture.

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Best of 2013

Thursday, January 02, 2014

This hour-long special hosted by Al Letson features three of Life of the Law's best stories of 2013. Letson leads listeners through the virtual world of games and the law, into a conflict over social mores and the law,

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On Prison and Pregnancy

Tuesday, December 17, 2013

United States incarcerates six times as many women as it did thirty years ago. Many of these women are already mothers, and four percent of incarcerated women enter prison pregnant. What happens to the babies born in the correctional system?

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