Streams

For the latest updates on the weather and your commute on Monday, check out our transit tracker

Fresh Air : About

Airs Monday through Thursday at 2pm on 93.9 FM; Airs Monday through Friday att 9pm on AM 820 and NJPR

"If you want to understand a political conflict, it helps to understand the culture in which that conflict is taking place," says host Terry Gross. Fresh Air is one of the most popular programs on public radio, breaking the "talk show" mold, and Gross is known for her fearless and insightful interviews with prominent figures in American arts, politics, and popular culture. "When there is a crisis in a foreign country, we sometimes call up that country's leading novelist or filmmaker to get the cultural perspective." Fresh Air features daily reports and reviews from critics and commentators on music, books, movies, and other cultural phenomena that invade the national psyche.

Produced by
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=13
Show Archive

Show Staff

  • Terry Gross

    Combine an intelligent interviewer with a roster of guests that, according to the Chicago Tribune, would be prized by any talk-show host, and you're bound to get an interesting conversation. Fresh Air's interviews, though, are in a category by themselves, distinguished by host and executive producer Terry Gross' unique approach.

Latest Stories from Fresh Air

Last updated: Sunday, February 01 2015 06:50 PM

Best Of: Benedict Cumberbatch & The Teenage Brain

Saturday, January 31 2015 01:00 AM

Fresh Air Weekend:Benedict Cumberbatch gained critical acclaim — and a big following — for his role in Sherlock. Now he's up for an Oscar for his portrayal of eccentric mathematician Alan Turing in The Imitation Game.  'American Sniper' is about a Navy SEAL whose service in Iraq made him a mythic figure has become a cultural lightning rod. But the squabbles are too simple for a low-key movie striking in its lack of stridency. Critic at large John Powers comments.  New research shows that teenagers' brains aren't fully insulated, so the signals travel slowly when they need to make decisions. Neuroscientist Frances Jensen, who wrote The Teenage Brain, explains. 

Why Parenting Is "All Joy And No Fun"

Friday, January 30 2015 08:00 PM

 Jennifer Senior writes about how about children change the lives of their parents—for better, and sometimes for worse.  She’s the author of All Joy and No Fun:  The Paradox of Modern Parenthood.  Senior considers the impact of children on marriage, sex, work, friendships, and one’s sense of self.  Her book draws on a wide variety of studies, surveys, social histories and interviews with parents.  Then David Edelstein reviews Timbuktu, one of the five nominees in this year's Academy Award race for Best Foreign Language Film. It centers on the radical Islamist occupation of Mali.  

Religion Scholar On Death, Extremism And Leaving The Seminary

Thursday, January 29 2015 07:00 PM

 Religion scholar Jack Miles edited the first ever Norton Anthology of World Religions. The anthology includes ancient and contemporary interpretations of Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism and Daoism. Miles discusses primary texts, extremism and death.  Also, book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews Outline by Rachel Cusk, a novel about divorce that pushes back against convention — not so much in its sentiment but in its form. 

The Science Of The Teenage Brain

Wednesday, January 28 2015 03:22 PM

Why do teenagers behave like — teenagers? We get an explanation from neuroscientist Dr. Frances Jensen, who says our brains are still maturing through our 20s and that the front part of the brain is the last to develop. "And what's in the front? Your frontal cortex and prefrontal cortex; these are the areas where we have insight, empathy, impulse control," she says. "Risk-taking behavior is suppressed by activity in your frontal lobes." Her new book is called The Teenage Brain.  Also critic at large John Powers comments on the controversy surrounding American Sniper. He says the film isn't as simple as some people seem to think. 

How The Beatles Changed The BBC

Tuesday, January 27 2015 08:53 PM

We talk to Kevin Howlett, the executive producer of The Beatles: On Air Live at the BBC Volume 2. The album is a collection of recordings of the Beatles performing originals, covers, and chatting with BBC hosts in the early '60s.