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Ask your medical ethics questions of Duke University bioethicist Nita Farahany. Each week in March, we'll tackle questions related to reproductive technology, privacy and genetics, and neuroscience. 

Ask a Bioethicist: Reproductive Technology

Tuesday, March 05, 2013

Duke University bioethicist Nita Farahany, tackles some of the thorniest bioethical conundrums of our day all month on the Brian Lehrer Show. Today's topic: Reproductive technology. Should parents be able to choose the sex of their baby? Should there be age limitations on people who undergo in vitro fertilization?

Comments [28]

Ask a Bioethicist: Privacy and Genetics

Wednesday, March 13, 2013

Each week in March, we'll talk about medical ethics with Duke University bioethicist Nita Farahany, who sits on the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues. She'll discuss some of the thorniest bioethical conundrums of our day.

Today's topic: Privacy and genetics. We want your suggestions of bioethical questions we should discuss. Ask your question below and we'll tackle as many as we can.

This complete interview originally aired live on March 13, 2013 as part of a month-long series. An edited version was re-aired on August 2, 2013 as part of a special hour of Ask a Bioethicist in a best-of episode of The Brian Lehrer Show.

Comments [13]

Ask a Bioethicist: Limits on Neuroenhancement

Thursday, March 21, 2013

Continuing a weekly series where we tackle thorny bioethical issues, Nita Farahany, Professor of Law and Philosophy and Professor of Genome Sciences & Policy at Duke University, discusses the limits of neuroenhancement.

This complete interview originally aired live on March 21, 2013 as part of a month-long series. An edited version was re-aired on August 2, 2013 as part of a special hour of Ask a Bioethicist in a best-of episode of The Brian Lehrer Show.

Comments [42]

Ask a Bioethicist: Blame It On The Brain

Tuesday, March 26, 2013

Continuing a weekly series where we tackle thorny bioethical issues, Nita Farahany, Professor of Law and Philosophy and Professor of Genome Sciences & Policy at Duke University, discusses today's topic: Blame it on the brain.

If something about your brain causes you to behave badly, is it really your fault? Should we judge a person less harshly if they're neurologically predisposed to lie, cheat, steal, or become addicted? What do you think? Comment here.

Comments [3]