Streams

Adoption, Children, and Choices

Friday, March 25, 2005

We were flooded with emails after today's segment on men who choose to get vasectomies at an early age. Whereas most of the callers on the show had been critical of the guest, Vincent Cicaccio, and his decision to have a vasectomy at age 23, the emails leaned a bit more heavily on the side of sympathizing with Vincent. And many raised the question: If you change your mind, why not adopt? The segment was originally inspired by an article on Salon.com by Dana Hudepohl.

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Fearing Irony?

Thursday, March 24, 2005

After yesterday's interview with Wole Soyinka, a listener wrote in to tell us about a website where you can read the full text of Soyinka's series of lectures on fear, upon which his book is based.

Today's discussion of American and British humor provoked quite a few ...

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Stadium Re-re-redux

Wednesday, March 23, 2005

Today's call-in for Westsiders on the bids for the railyards generated many calls and emails. Here are a couple of email selections:

from an email in support of the Cablevision proposal:
The two bids on the table for the Rail yards both underline the need for further open and ...

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Living and Dying

Tuesday, March 22, 2005

Today's show touched on the Terri Schiavo case in two segments. The phones were lit up for the whole first hour with listeners wanting to put in their two cents and the email inbox filled up.

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Annoyances Part 2

Friday, March 18, 2005

We followed through on our threat to help Ian Urbina of the New York Times document the myriad means of retaliating against life’s little annoyances. Today’s open phones ended up being more about anti-telemarketing tactics, but we got some ideas nonetheless. Here's a sampling of the email below, but based on this morning's call-in, our listeners certainly demonstrated their darker, more sadistic side.

Meanwhile, today’s New York 51 guest, Councilmember Tony Avella, claimed to be one of the coiners of the word "McMansion." We thought it worth pointing to the word’s true etymology.

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Empirical Evidence

Thursday, March 17, 2005

Today's open phones featured a caller who suggested the US was not a true democracy on account of its imperialist tendencies. Her call caused a flood of emails. Here are some responses.

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The Quiet Rebellion

Wednesday, March 16, 2005

It may not be your typical New York Times front page story, but yesterday’s article on passive aggressive ways to deal with “life’s annoyances” quickly became the paper’s most emailed. They featured the coffee drinker who asks for “medium” when they want a starbucks’ “grande” and a ...

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Oil Containment

Tuesday, March 15, 2005

Yesterday's Financial Times report (reg. required) that US Administration officials were seeking to "contain" Venezuelan president Hugo Chavez led us to discuss the issue on this morning's show. Types of email responses varied in their stances and we thought we'd publish a few of them here.

Please keep the responses coming.

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Too Hot97 to Handle

Friday, March 11, 2005

City Council member Charles Barron came by the studio this morning to talk about his district as part of our New York 51 series. His district includes parts of East New York, Brownsville, East Flatbush and Canarsie. He had recently attended a rally against some ...

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News In Decline

Thursday, March 10, 2005

Here are some of the emails we received in response to Tom Fenton's visit to the studio:

I was struck by Mr. Fenton's remark that prior to the hostage crisis, network news was obsessed with shark attacks. I became a fan of Dan Rather when, during the summer of ...

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SAT Down Pat

Wednesday, March 09, 2005

SAT tutor Matt Bardin stopped by to talk about the New SAT exam, what makes it "new" and how to deal with the stress of taking the test. He has a book on the subject coming out the summer (with co-author Susan Fine) from Houghton Mifflin. Here's a selection from the introduction to the book, "Zen in the Art of the SAT: How to Think, Focus and Achieve Your Highest Score:"

How do you feel when you’re taking a test and get a question about something you don’t know? Your heart rate goes up. You might feel heat in your chest or your temples. If only you had read that chapter more carefully or memorized that formula – but now there’s nothing you can do. You make up some feeble nonsense in hopes of getting partial credit. Whether this happens to you all the time or almost never, it’s one of the worst feelings you can experience as a student.

Continue reading here.

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Around the World

Tuesday, March 08, 2005

We carried President Bush's speech live during this morning's show. One of the guests who joined Brian to offer analysis of the speech was Jefferson Morley who writes a "World Opinion Roundup" column for washingtonpost.com. Some of the publications he follows are:

Der Spiegel
The Toronto Star
The Daily Star in Lebanon

Today was also Part 6 in our ongoing Social Security series: How does the president's plan affect those over 55? The guests came from two of the many squaring off in this debate.

Continue reading more about Social Security...

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Sunday Night Blues

Monday, March 07, 2005

Many listeners wrote in from far and wide with their own stories and theories about the Sunday Night Blues. Jared Sandberg, the Cubicle Culture columnist for the Wall Street Journal, stopped by to talk about his recent column on the phenomenon of Sunday Night depression in anticipation of the start of the work week.

He also joined us for our Labor Day show.

Many listeners wrote in with their own stories and theories about the Sunday Night Blues. Read a selection in the extended entry.

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The Three Ten Commandments

Wednesday, March 02, 2005

Today the Supreme Court heard arguments on a first ammendment case. At the heart of the case is whether or not a monument containing the Ten Commandments can be displayed on government property.

In a strange twist to the story many of these monuments were supplied by Cecil B. DeMille in an effort to promote his movie The Ten Commandments. In addition Charlton Heston and Yul Brynner , who played Moses and Rameses, attended many of the dedications of the monuments.

In our extended entry you can view three versions of the Commandments- Protestant, Catholic and Jewish.

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All Dolled Up

Tuesday, March 01, 2005

Move over Barbie here comes Condi. Toy company Herobuilder has developed a
Condoleezza Rice doll. Do you think she comes with fashion accesories like stiletto boots? Other dolls available are Hillary Clinton, Howard Dean and George Bush.

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The lives of wives

Monday, February 28, 2005

Here is some of the feedback from our segment on the book "The Meaning of Wife."

I am a lesbian wife. My female partner works full time and I do everything else in our household in addition to being a full time doctoral student, and it works well for ...

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Stories to Tell

Wednesday, February 23, 2005

Today we asked listeners to contribute stories they felt worth telling. Here are a few sent by email.

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Stories To Tell

Tuesday, February 22, 2005

What are the stories you tell your friends and family about life where your live? Email us and then call in tomorrow to share your stories from your block, neighborhood, or city.

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Social Security Part 4: Mathematics 1

Tuesday, February 22, 2005

If after yesterday's installment in our Social Security series (Mathematics, Part 1), you're still confused about how your social security benefits are calculated, we received this email from a 31-year claims representative who kindly explains it all in detail:

When figuring a retirement benefit, 35 years of earnings are used. People who have 35 years of earnings get the highest benefit payments. If you don't have 35 years of earnings, and many people do not - for a variety of reasons- out of work, out of country, out for raising children, self employed and not paying in (even though they should have been,) working off the books (a very common one) we still divide by 35, to determine your average, so if you only have 28 years, as an example, you have 7 zeroes in the computation which brings down your average. If you only had 10 years of earnings in the U.S. (which is the minimum number of years needed to qualify for "something", that "something is determined by still divided by 35, which makes it a relatively low benefit payment. ...

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Bush smoked out by Wead

Monday, February 21, 2005

President Bush can't seem to escape his past. As he was leaving for Europe new audio tapes were released with the President discussing his past drug use. Douglas Wead, a longtime Bush family friend, secretly recorded the conversations with George Bush as he was gearing up to run for President.

Our extended entry contains the transcripts of the tapes heard on ABC news.
And send us your thoughts on this subject, do you think the President was right to lie about his past to protect children from following his example?
Email us.

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