Streams

Where To Put The Pre-K Seats?

Tuesday, August 12, 2014

There aren't enough seats in public schools for the expanded pre-k program in New York City, so the city is looking to put classes in community and religious schools. Richard Buery, deputy mayor for Strategic Policy Initiative, talks about the line between church and state in these pre-k classrooms, and the guidelines for how teachers can walk the line between cultural and religious instruction.

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Drawing the Line

Tuesday, August 12, 2014

New York City’s universal pre-k program will hold some classes in religious institutions due to a shortage of seats in public schools. Richard Buery, the deputy mayor for strategic policy initiative, explains how the line between church and state in these classrooms won’t blur. Plus: NYPD Commissioner Bill Bratton on the state of community policing; your thoughts the Democratic National Committee holding its big convention in Brooklyn in 2016; and remembering Robin Williams.

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Statistics Tricks

Monday, August 11, 2014

Gary Smith, economics professor at Pomona College in Claremont, CA, looks at all the ways data, big and small, can be manipulated and offers a guide to gleaning the truth behind the trickery. He's the author of Standard Deviations: Flawed Assumptions, Tortured Data, and Other Ways to Lie with Statistics.

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What You Don't Know You Don't Know About Food Stamps

Monday, August 11, 2014

There's a lot of data about who uses food stamps, but the information about how some businesses profit off the SNAP program is not available. That could soon change. Krissy Clark, correspondent for the wealth and poverty desk at Marketplace, explains what we might learn (and why we should care) about how companies do business with food stamps.

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Remember Member Items?

Monday, August 11, 2014

The discretionary funds process was overhauled this year by Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito. We dig into the data to see how different council members spent their (your) money with Jeff Mays, DNAinfo political reporter. Nigel Chiwaya, DNAinfo visual journalist, dug into (and visualized) the data set of every discretionary fund to identify patterns and will help listeners do the same in the open data set on our site.

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Return to Iraq

Monday, August 11, 2014

Bobby Ghosh, managing editor of Quartz, talks about the latest from Iraq and the debate over renewed U.S. military intervention there in support of American personnel in Erbil and the Yazidi refugees.

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Things You Thought You Already Knew

Monday, August 11, 2014

You might think you already know the correct way to sharpen a pencil or swat a fly, but the host of National Geographic’s show “Going Deep” begs to differ. David Rees teaches us how to fold a better paper airplane – among other things – on the air. Plus: digging into how each City Council member spends discretionary money in their districts; a look at why we don't know how much money businesses make on food stamps; and all the (many) ways data can be manipulated. 

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David Rees Teaches Brian Lehrer to Make the Perfect Paper Airplane

Monday, August 11, 2014

In his new TV series "Going Deep," David Rees investigates the science and process behind very basic tasks, like tying a shoelace or ice melting. He talks about the little things and teaches Brian - and you - to fold the perfect paper airplane. Here are the visual instructions for David's perfect plane.

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Brian Lehrer Weekend

Friday, August 08, 2014

Three of our favorite segments from the week, in case you missed them.

Trouble Filling Affordable Housing (First) | Listener Africa Summit (Starts at 19:00) | Milton Glaser on the Dying Earth (Starts at 32:20)

If you don't subscribe to the Brian Lehrer Show on iTunes, you can do that here. Please rate and review us to help others discover the Brian Lehrer Show.

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Back in Iraq

Friday, August 08, 2014

Reports this morning indicate that the U.S. has begun to bomb key ISIS locations, after President Obama last night authorized humanitarian drops to help refugees stranded in Northern Iraq. Mark Landler, White House correspondent for The New York Times, discusses the latest developments, and what it says about the Obama administration's willingness to use American military power.

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The Wealth Gap in College Sports Just Got Even Bigger

Friday, August 08, 2014

The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) has just voted to approve new guidelines that will allow schools in the top five athletic conferences to spend even more money on sports. Steve Eder, Investigative Sports Reporter at The New York Times, breaks down how this might create what some are calling a two-tiered league with a now even bigger gap between the schools at the top and all the rest, and how all of this will end up affecting college athletes.

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The Secret Roots of Our Shark Freak-Outs

Friday, August 08, 2014

It's a summer ritual - everyone freaks out about shark attacks. But, according to WNYC reporter Jim O'Grady, it's a fairly recent phenomenon and one that can be traced to an attack in 1916 in Matawan, NJ. 

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40 Years After Nixon Resigns

Friday, August 08, 2014

40 years ago today, President Nixon announced he was resigning from office. Elizabeth Holtzman was a member of the House Judiciary Committee in 1974 (D-Brooklyn) and had sought to impeach him over the unauthorized bombing of Cambodia. She looks back on Nixon's presidency and the Watergate hearings.

Where were you on August 8, 1974?  

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What's Your NYC Sanctuary?

Friday, August 08, 2014

WNYC is gathering your ideas -- and making a map -- for where you escape in the NYC area for some peace, quiet, and reflection. We take your calls to talk about your favorite quiet space.

 

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Drugs for Ebola?

Friday, August 08, 2014

Anthony Fauci, immunologist and the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) at The National Institutes of Health, talks about the experimental drug treatment for two Americans with Ebola and the current best practices for stopping the current outbreak.

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Resignation, Compensation and Experimentation

Friday, August 08, 2014

The U.S. has begun bombing in Northern Iraq to strike key ISIS strongholds and aid a humanitarian mission on a remote mountaintop. We update the latest. Plus: Richard Nixon resigned 40 years ago today. Elizabeth Holtzman, who was a member of the House Judiciary Committee at the time, looks back on the Watergate scandal. And Anthony Fauci of the National Institutes of Health explains best practices for containing Ebola; what an NCAA rule change means; and your favorite NYC sanctuaries. 

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Is this Developer Dilemma Real?

Thursday, August 07, 2014

Is Brooklyn so gentrified that there aren't even people to fill affordable housing? Barika Williams, policy director at Association for Neighborhood and Housing Development (ANHD), talks about the state of affordable housing and the report that there aren't enough local residents who qualify for some Brooklyn units.

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Asylum on the Immigration Court Docket

Thursday, August 07, 2014

As cases for unaccompanied minors make their way through immigration courts, the question of who qualifies for asylum is a big one. Judge Dana Leigh Marks has been an immigration judge in San Francisco for 27 years and is the president of the National Association of Immigration Judges. She talks about the decisions that immigration judges have to make and what the law says about who qualifies.

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Why Work Out Till You Puke?

Thursday, August 07, 2014

Between Crossfit, P90X and the Tough Mudder races, extreme work outs (that sometimes cause participants to vomit or otherwise injure themselves) are growing in popularity. Julie Beck, senior associate health editor at The Atlantic, and Gretchen Reynolds, author of the "Phys Ed" column for the New York Times Well blog, explore the motivations behind this form of exercise and wonder if it's even healthy.

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Who Gets to See the CIA Torture Report

Thursday, August 07, 2014

The release of the Senate's massive assessment of the U.S. torture practices has once again been delayed amid argument about who gets to see it, who gets to redact it, and whether the public will ever get to know. Karen Greenberg, director of the Center on National Security at Fordham Law University, discusses what comes next.

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