Streams

Politics in India's Really Really Big Election

Thursday, April 10, 2014

Today is the third day of voting in the 2014 Indian elections. Marshall Bouton, interim director of the Asia Society Policy Institute and former special assistant to the US ambassador to India, discusses the big issues in the vote, who the candidates are, and what role religious affiliations are playing in the election.

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Not a Rat, a Cat

Thursday, April 10, 2014

Mark Riley, journalist and political analyst, discusses recent revelations that Rev. Al Sharpton cooperated with the FBI to get information from one of New York's most notorious mafia crime families in the 1980s.

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Things That Are Too Big To Fail

Thursday, April 10, 2014

The biggest election on earth is underway in India. We'll hear about the candidates and issues on the ballot. Then: U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York Preet Bharara explains why he doesn't think the Moreland Commission on public corruption should have been disbanded, as well as possible charges against big banks. Plus: the long (really long) view of the Arab Spring; Al Sharpton's past with the FBI; and sifting through Medicare data.

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Talking About How Much You Make

Wednesday, April 09, 2014

President Obama has signed an executive order prohibiting government contractors from punishing workers who discuss or compare their salaries. The idea is to promote equal pay by promoting transparency. Have you ever discussed your salary with a co-worker? How did it go and what did you learn? If you were surprised, did you do anything about it? Call in and tell us about what happened when you talked about how much you make. 212-433-WNYC 212-433-9692 

Update: The Senate's Paycheck Fairness Act which would have imposed the same requirement on private employers was blocked by Republicans today. 

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Comments [26]

Parents Battle (Mostly Each Other) on Sleep

Wednesday, April 09, 2014

All parents want babies who can sleep like a baby, whatever that means. But how to get there is as fraught as a sleep deprived parent facing a dirty diaper right after they got the snow suit on! Listeners share their baby sleep solutions and conundrums with Hillary Frank, writer and creator of the podcast, The Longest Shortest Time, and Dr. Judith Owens, director of sleep medicine at Children’s National Medical Center. Is a week a long time to listen to her cry? Is 10:30pm too late for a toddler to get to bed? Will your wife ever stop sleeping with the kids? Hear the answers, and throw in your comments on kids under four and how, where, when, and why they should sleep.

 

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The Palisades View

Wednesday, April 09, 2014

LG has started work on its new high-rise headquarters near the Palisades in New Jersey. Christine Todd Whitman, former New Jersey governor and EPA administrator, co-chair of CASEnergy Coalition, a nuclear power advocacy group and president of Whitman Strategy Group, explains why she is against the project, which she says will spoil the natural beauty and view of the Palisades – “sticking up like a thumb in the middle of a green swath.”

Then: John Taylor, vice president of public affairs for LG Electronics USA, defends LG's plans to build its (tall) new US headquarters.

On today’s show, Whitman said she’s sensitive to the need for jobs, but that it’s not a question of whether LG should build its headquarters or not – it’s a matter of how the building is designed. “They [LG] could lay the building on its side and create the same amount of space for its employees,” she said. Whitman worried that if LG builds above the tree line, it will be a slippery slope and lead to more tall buildings near the Palisades. “I can see developers looking at this as a prime area of development,” she said. “And they’d want to go up, so they can have that view.”

Later on the show, Taylor responded to Whitman’s critique of the building. He said the building will be environmentally sound and will “protect the Palisades” and that the building is going to reduce runoff. “We love the Palisades and would never do anything to harm them,” he said. Taylor also pointed out that demolition on the project site is already underway, and that New Jersey needs the jobs this will provide – both in construction and at LG – right away. He said the process has been in the works for seven years and that LG doesn’t have time to change its plans.

“Would it be possible to build it shorter and fatter? Indeed,” he said. “But it will take years to re-design the building, go through all the approval processes again.” And the bottom line? “That frankly will not meet our business needs.” 

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Making and Unmaking Chris Christie

Wednesday, April 09, 2014

Ryan Lizza, Washington correspondent for The New Yorker magazine, looks at Chris Christie's development as a politician and how his political future is being challenged by Bridgegate.

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Christie’s Future; Sleep for Infants and Parents; The Palisades View

Wednesday, April 09, 2014

Governor Christie’s political future is uncertain since Bridgegate. The New Yorker’s Ryan Lizza discusses Christie’s political development and how the scandal is affecting his plans for the future. Plus: possible reforms to the evidence-sharing system in New York; parents of infants and young children talk about their sleep issues; and former New Jersey Governor Christine Todd Whitman explains why she thinks plans for the new LG headquarters along the Palisades should be re-designed.

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A Thumb on the Scales of Justice in NYS?

Wednesday, April 09, 2014

Kate Pastor, freelance journalist and former editor-in-chief of The Riverdale Press, talks about New York's stringent evidence-sharing rules (tougher than those in Texas!) and efforts to require prosecutors to be more forthcoming with material that could aid criminal defendants.

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Missing: Arts in Schools

Tuesday, April 08, 2014

Scott M. Stringer, New York City comptroller, talks about his school-by-school assessment of state-mandated arts education and the uneven distribution of resources around the city.

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Twitter Co-Founder: 'I use full sentences. I don't abbreviate. I don't use emoticons.'

Tuesday, April 08, 2014

Biz Stone, co-founder of Twitter and author of Things a Little Bird Told Me: Confessions of a Creative Mind, discusses his new book, which details how his creativity helped him develop such popular Internet mainstays as blogging, podcasting and Twitter. 

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Comments [15]

Advice Roulette: Working Women

Tuesday, April 08, 2014

Today is a special installment of our occasional feature - radio advice roulette! In honor of Equal Pay Day, women listeners can ask fellow listeners for job-related advice live on the radio. By some estimates, women still earn on average about 77 cents for every dollar a man earns, and so today symbolizes how long into the new year a woman has to work to earn what a man in the same job earned just in 2013. So this special edition of advice roulette is for women to give and get advice about careers, the workplace, and their home/work balance.

Here's how it works: If you need advice on anything work-related, whether it's how to ask for a raise, a promotion, more time off, anything - call 212-433-9692 and we'll pair you with a fellow WNYC listener. The catch? Before you get to ask for advice from someone, you have to give advice to another caller. 

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Comments [11]

Pushing Back on Cuomo's "Wall Street" Budget

Tuesday, April 08, 2014

Though both Cuomo and de Blasio are counting the most recent state budget as a victory, many on the left are unhappy with some of the provisions that were included--and left out. Karen Scharff, executive director of Citizen Action of New York and co-chair of the Working Families Party, and James Parrott, chief economist and deputy director of the Fiscal Policy Institute, discuss the budget.

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Comments [25]

An Update to Our List of What We Know the NSA Can Do (So Far)

Tuesday, April 08, 2014

In January, we started keeping a running list of technology the NSA has at its disposal -- disclosed by the documents stolen by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden and leaked to the media. Shane Harris, senior staff writer at Foreign Policy, returns to discuss the updates to the list since he was last on.

→ See The Full List and Add Your Comments Here

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NYS Budget Pushback; NSA Updates; Twitter Co-Founder; Scott Stringer

Tuesday, April 08, 2014

Some on the left side of the political spectrum are unhappy with aspects of New York State’s new budget. Karen Scharff of the Working Families Party and James Parrott of the Fiscal Policy Institute share their critiques. Plus: an update to our running list of what the NSA can do to monitor communication and data; Twitter co-founder Biz Stone talks about how his creativity led him to create such popular Internet mainstays as Blogger and Twitter; And New York City comptroller Scott Stringer talks about the uneven distribution of arts education resources in schools around the city.

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How Artist-Friendly is Your Neighborhood?

Monday, April 07, 2014

Inspired by a piece in The New York Times this weekend, "Last Bohemian Turns Out the Lights", we're starting the show today with an artist's census. What's your neighborhood like for you? What do you do to support your art, and what do you need to get more support? 

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Comments [42]

Micropolis: The Color of Skin

Monday, April 07, 2014

Millions of women around the world use skin-lightening creams. Arun Venugopal, WNYC reporter, discusses the different attitudes towards cosmetics and race and his reporting for the new series, Micropolis.

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Comments [44]

Late Night TV Changes

Monday, April 07, 2014

David Letterman announced he'll retire from the Late Show sometime next year. Matt Zoller Seitz, TV critic for New York Magazine and Vulture.com and Editor-in-chief of RogerEbert.com, discusses the talk-show host's place in the history of late night TV, his comedic innovations and takes your (non-traditional) suggestions on who might replace Letterman.

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Comments [29]

The CIA Torture Report You'll Finally (Maybe) Get to Read

Monday, April 07, 2014

The Senate Intelligence Committee has voted to release the massive report detailing Bush-era interrogation techniques. The White House still has to approve it, though - Karen Greenberg, head of Fordham's Center on National Security, discusses what we know and can expect.

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Comments [7]

NYC and the Arts; Skin Lightening Around the World; American Presidents and Big Banks; Letterman’s Retirement

Monday, April 07, 2014

A long report on Bush-era interrogation techniques may soon become public. Karen Greenberg, head of Fordham's Center on National Security, discusses what to expect. Plus: NYC and arts incubation; the use of skin-lightening creams around the world and what it says about race; the symbiotic relationship between American presidents and big banks; and your suggestions for David Letterman’s replacement since he announced plans to retire in 2015. 

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