Streams

David Rees Teaches Brian Lehrer to Make the Perfect Paper Airplane

Monday, August 11, 2014

In his new TV series "Going Deep," David Rees investigates the science and process behind very basic tasks, like tying a shoelace or ice melting. He talks about the little things and teaches Brian - and you - to fold the perfect paper airplane. Here are the visual instructions for David's perfect plane.

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Things You Thought You Already Knew

Monday, August 11, 2014

You might think you already know the correct way to sharpen a pencil or swat a fly, but the host of National Geographic’s show “Going Deep” begs to differ. David Rees teaches us how to fold a better paper airplane – among other things – on the air. Plus: digging into how each City Council member spends discretionary money in their districts; a look at why we don't know how much money businesses make on food stamps; and all the (many) ways data can be manipulated. 

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Brian Lehrer Weekend

Friday, August 08, 2014

Three of our favorite segments from the week, in case you missed them.

Trouble Filling Affordable Housing (First) | Listener Africa Summit (Starts at 19:00) | Milton Glaser on the Dying Earth (Starts at 32:20)

If you don't subscribe to the Brian Lehrer Show on iTunes, you can do that here. Please rate and review us to help others discover the Brian Lehrer Show.

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Back in Iraq

Friday, August 08, 2014

Reports this morning indicate that the U.S. has begun to bomb key ISIS locations, after President Obama last night authorized humanitarian drops to help refugees stranded in Northern Iraq. Mark Landler, White House correspondent for The New York Times, discusses the latest developments, and what it says about the Obama administration's willingness to use American military power.

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The Wealth Gap in College Sports Just Got Even Bigger

Friday, August 08, 2014

The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) has just voted to approve new guidelines that will allow schools in the top five athletic conferences to spend even more money on sports. Steve Eder, Investigative Sports Reporter at The New York Times, breaks down how this might create what some are calling a two-tiered league with a now even bigger gap between the schools at the top and all the rest, and how all of this will end up affecting college athletes.

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The Secret Roots of Our Shark Freak-Outs

Friday, August 08, 2014

It's a summer ritual - everyone freaks out about shark attacks. But, according to WNYC reporter Jim O'Grady, it's a fairly recent phenomenon and one that can be traced to an attack in 1916 in Matawan, NJ. 

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40 Years After Nixon Resigns

Friday, August 08, 2014

40 years ago today, President Nixon announced he was resigning from office. Elizabeth Holtzman was a member of the House Judiciary Committee in 1974 (D-Brooklyn) and had sought to impeach him over the unauthorized bombing of Cambodia. She looks back on Nixon's presidency and the Watergate hearings.

Where were you on August 8, 1974?  

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What's Your NYC Sanctuary?

Friday, August 08, 2014

WNYC is gathering your ideas -- and making a map -- for where you escape in the NYC area for some peace, quiet, and reflection. We take your calls to talk about your favorite quiet space.

 

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Drugs for Ebola?

Friday, August 08, 2014

Anthony Fauci, immunologist and the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) at The National Institutes of Health, talks about the experimental drug treatment for two Americans with Ebola and the current best practices for stopping the current outbreak.

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Resignation, Compensation and Experimentation

Friday, August 08, 2014

The U.S. has begun bombing in Northern Iraq to strike key ISIS strongholds and aid a humanitarian mission on a remote mountaintop. We update the latest. Plus: Richard Nixon resigned 40 years ago today. Elizabeth Holtzman, who was a member of the House Judiciary Committee at the time, looks back on the Watergate scandal. And Anthony Fauci of the National Institutes of Health explains best practices for containing Ebola; what an NCAA rule change means; and your favorite NYC sanctuaries. 

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Is this Developer Dilemma Real?

Thursday, August 07, 2014

Is Brooklyn so gentrified that there aren't even people to fill affordable housing? Barika Williams, policy director at Association for Neighborhood and Housing Development (ANHD), talks about the state of affordable housing and the report that there aren't enough local residents who qualify for some Brooklyn units.

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Asylum on the Immigration Court Docket

Thursday, August 07, 2014

As cases for unaccompanied minors make their way through immigration courts, the question of who qualifies for asylum is a big one. Judge Dana Leigh Marks has been an immigration judge in San Francisco for 27 years and is the president of the National Association of Immigration Judges. She talks about the decisions that immigration judges have to make and what the law says about who qualifies.

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Why Work Out Till You Puke?

Thursday, August 07, 2014

Between Crossfit, P90X and the Tough Mudder races, extreme work outs (that sometimes cause participants to vomit or otherwise injure themselves) are growing in popularity. Julie Beck, senior associate health editor at The Atlantic, and Gretchen Reynolds, author of the "Phys Ed" column for the New York Times Well blog, explore the motivations behind this form of exercise and wonder if it's even healthy.

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Who Gets to See the CIA Torture Report

Thursday, August 07, 2014

The release of the Senate's massive assessment of the U.S. torture practices has once again been delayed amid argument about who gets to see it, who gets to redact it, and whether the public will ever get to know. Karen Greenberg, director of the Center on National Security at Fordham Law University, discusses what comes next.

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#TBT Brian and Ira Glass

Thursday, August 07, 2014

It's 'Throwback Thursday' and we're marking the 25th anniversary of the show this fall with a dip into the Brian Lehrer Show archives every week. This week, we go back to 1997, when Brian welcomed This American Life host Ira Glass on the show to talk about "the station's newest hit show." WNYC had just started carrying the program and he and Brian talk about the program's format, what's hard about making it, and even distribution (TAL was in negotiations with both PRI and NPR at the time). The whole interview is below. 

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How Brooklyn Is Your Product?

Thursday, August 07, 2014

A new certification program looks to promote -- and correctly label -- products that are "Brooklyn Made." Carlo Scissura, President of the Brooklyn Chamber of Commerce, discusses the growing economy of Brooklyn-ness and the Brooklyn brand worldwide.

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Here's How to Qualify

Thursday, August 07, 2014

“Brooklyn Made” is good for business. Carlo Scissura, the president of the Brooklyn Chamber of Commerce, explains how businesses can get the official certification. Plus: arguments over the frequently-delayed Senate report on U.S. torture practices; the motivation behind super-intense work outs like P90X and CrossFit that even sometimes make people physically ill; a potential problem with the affordable housing formula; and a look at the decisions that’ll have to be made in immigration courts on which unaccompanied minors qualify for asylum. 

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What's In Store For Those Old Payphone Kiosks?

Wednesday, August 06, 2014

The current contract to service NYC's payphones expires this October. Jay Cassano, senior writer at Fast Company Labs, talks about the various
proposals being floated to re-purpose the old kiosks (free wi-fi anyone?), and takes your calls with your ideas for how these phone booths should be re-purposed.

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What Happened Over the Last 25 Years? Help Us Brainstorm

Wednesday, August 06, 2014

This is the 25th year of the Brian Lehrer Show, and all this fall we'll be marking it with a year-by-year look at some of the defining stories from 1989 through 2014. Right now, we're at the brainstorming stage, also known as the "remember that thing that happened that year?" stage. And we need your help!

In the spreadsheet below, the producers of the show are starting to fill in items from each year (thanks Wikipedia!), but we've opened the spreadsheet for you to help remember what really mattered. So join in when you have a few minutes, starting with any year. A few guidelines:

  • We're looking for items that had a public impact, both local, national and international. There will be opportunities for you to reflect on your personal memories from each year soon, but for now we're taking suggestions for news/events.
  • Anything goes, but we're particularly fascinated by stories that ended up having a bigger impact than anticipated. Our favorite example is the repeal of Glass-Steagall in 1999, which was somewhat overlooked at the time but sowed the seeds for the financial crisis a decade later.
  • This is an open spreadsheet, but please don't erase or edit other entries. For now, we're collecting as many ideas as possible!
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Remembering Steve Post

Wednesday, August 06, 2014

Share your memories of longtime WNYC radio host Steve Post (Morning Music, The No Show), along with his friend Larry Josephson, veteran public radio producer and host and founder of the Radio Foundation.

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