Streams

How Malaysian Airlines Flight 17 Changes the Game in Russia

Friday, July 18, 2014

The Russian government is denying any involvement in the downing of Malaysian Airlines Flight 17, shot down over Eastern Ukraine yesterday. US officials have stopped short of implicating Russia, but former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton says these events "put [Vladimir] Putin on notice that he has gone too far and we are not going to stand idly by." Julia Ioffe, Senior Editor at The New Republic and Russian-American journalist, discusses the latest and explains the geopolitical implications of the attack.

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Looking Back and Moving Forward

Friday, July 18, 2014

All this week, we spoke with advocates for some of the New York City's most important issues to assess how Mayor de Blasio has done in his first six months in office. Today, First Deputy Mayor Anthony Shorris — who, by executive order, is officially in charge of the city until Mayor de Blasio returns from his 10-day vacation in Italy — offers his response to the advocates. Plus: What the crash of Malaysian Airlines Flight 17 means for geopolitics; your thoughts on the LIRR after a deal to avoid a strike; the rise of intergenerational households in America; and spilling your guts about a book that's impacted you.

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Whose Side are You on in the LIRR Dispute?

Thursday, July 17, 2014

Both sides are close to a "breakthrough" in the Long Island Railroad labor dispute. Long Island commuters - whose side are you on, what do you make of the union demands? Call 212-433-9692...

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Six Months In, Is De Blasio's Housing Policy Truly Progressive?

Thursday, July 17, 2014

All this week on the Brian Lehrer Show we're checking in on the de Blasio administration's progress on a variety of key issues, six months into his first term. We'll talk to advocacy groups about how the mayor has lived up to his campaign promises on the environment, crime, housing, and more. Friday, we'll hear from Deputy Mayor Anthony Shorris.

Barika Williams, Policy Director at Association for Neighborhood and Housing Development (ANHD), assesses the Mayor's housing plan -- including increased density -- and how it compares to his progressive vision for the city. Plus, she'll review new policies on homelessness and neighborhood outreach.

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Comments [20]

How Brooklyn's New Marijuana Policy Will Play on the Streets

Thursday, July 17, 2014

Brooklyn District Attorney Kenneth Thompson announced this week that he'll no longer prosecute low-level marijuana possession cases. But NYPD Commissioner Bratton has instructed the NYPD to continue making arrestsEugene O'Donnell, professor of law and police science at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, former police officer, and former prosecutor, discusses what this means for Brooklyn residents and law enforcement on the ground.

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Comments [27]

When Rights Collide

Thursday, July 17, 2014

The rhetoric about immigration is heating up in Washington as lawmakers debate what to do about the 57,000 minors who have crossed the border since October. But we want to hear from you: What should should we do about this recent border crisis? Plus: Discussing the potential fallout after the Brooklyn DA's recent announcement that he'll stop prosecuting low-level marijuana offenses, grading Mayor de Blasio on housing and development after six months, and the co-founder and President of Lyft discusses the contested legality of his ride-sharing app.

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Deportation vs. Asylum: What's Your Take on the Border Crisis?

Thursday, July 17, 2014

Roughly 57,000 minors from Central America have crossed the border into the US since October. Some policy-makers say they should be deported as quickly as possible. Others say they should be welcomed as refugees. What do you think about the tone used by policy-makers and the status of these young immigrants?

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Lyft Launches - And Unlaunches - in NYC

Thursday, July 17, 2014

Lyft, that ride-sharing startup, was set to launch in  NYC until the city threatened to seize their cars for operating without a livery license. John Zimmer, co-founder and President of Lyft, discusses his efforts and what comes next.

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Remembering the Harlem Riot of 1964

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

50 years ago, 15-year-old James Powell was shot and killed by Lieutenant Thomas Gilligan, igniting a spree of riots in Harlem and Bedford-Stuyvesant that spread throughout the country. Peniel Joseph, professor of history and founding director of the Center for the Study of Race and Democracy at Tufts University, and author of Dark Days, Bright Nights: From Black Power to Barack Obama (Basic Books, 2010), and David Paterson, former governor of New York, talk about the legacy and context of the 1964 riots. Plus, listeners call in with their memories.

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A 'Culture of Brutality' on Rikers Island

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

On Monday, The New York Times published an investigation — based on more than a hundred incident reports — where it was found that Department of Corrections guards at Rikers Island had beaten inmates so severely that they required medical attention beyond the prison's capabilities. The Times also obtained a secret study conducted by the city's Health and Mental Hygiene department, which "helps lay bare the culture of brutality on the island and makes clear that it is inmates with mental illnesses who absorb the overwhelming brunt of the violence." Michael Winerip and Michael Schwirtz, The Times reporters who conducted the investigation, discuss their reporting and the policy implications.

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Should The U.S. Adopt An 'Anti-Amazon' Law?

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

The novelist Pamela Druckerman wrote an op-ed in The New York Times about France's so-called "Anti-Amazon law," which bans online booksellers from offering free shipping on discounted books. The law, which French Parliament passed unanimously, is designed to help independent book stores survive. The U.S. doesn't have a similar law — but should it? Dougal Thomson, Director of Communications and Programmes for the International Publishers Association, discusses the pros and cons of fixed book price systems from his recent global report for his organization — and whether America should consider books special, as so many other countries do.

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Comments [27]

De Blasio at Six Months: Where New York's New Jobs Will Come From

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

All this week on the Brian Lehrer Show we're checking in on the de Blasio administration's progress on a variety of key issues, six months into his first term. We'll talk to advocacy groups about how the mayor has lived up to his campaign promises on the environment, crime, housing, and more. Friday, we'll hear from Deputy Mayor Anthony Shorris.

New York City Comptroller Scott Stringer and Richard Florida, professor at New York University, director of the Martin Prosperity
Institute at the University of Toronto and senior editor at The Atlantic, say they have a blueprint to create jobs for an "inclusive and creative" New York. They discuss their proposals, their event at NYU this afternoon, and whether tech can really drive middle-class growth. Plus, Stringer assesses the de Blasio administration's jobs record thus far, as part of our week-long series.

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Ditch That Meeting And Call Us

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

We try an on-air listener experiment. At exactly 11:15 am, we want you to cut out of whatever meeting you're in — say you're going to the bathroom, or whatever — and call the show. The number is 212-433-9692. Excuse yourself by 11:15, then call us up and talk about the meeting you just left, and whatever else is on your mind.

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Comments [14]

Rikers Violence, French Books, and Sneaking Out Of Meetings

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

If you ever wanted an excuse to leave your excruciating meeting, now you have it. We want you to sneak out of your meeting for an "important phone call" — to Brian. Plus: Former Governor David Paterson on the 50th anniversary of the Harlem Riot of 1964; The New York Times uncovers systematic brutality against inmates in Rikers Island; debating whether the U.S. should adopt France's "anti-Amazon" law; and a blueprint for new jobs for New York City.

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Game of Drones

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

More and more New Yorkers are flying drones in and around New York City. But the laws surrounding drone use aren't so clear. Gregory McNeal, Professor at Pepperdine University School of Law and contributor to Forbes, discusses domestic drone laws and the issues drones pose in New York City.

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The CEO Sleep Experiment

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

After WNYC's "Clock Your Sleep" project, four CEOs launched an experiment to encourage their employees to rest more during the day, get better sleep, and stay away from email after work. Laura Walker, President and CEO of New York Public Radio, Arianna Huffington, chair, president, and editor-in-chief of the Huffington Post Media Group, Herb Scannell, President of BBC Worldwide America, and MaryAnne Gilmartin, CEO at Forest City Ratner Companies, check in on what they learned and what permanent changes might work for them.

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Six Months In, Has de Blasio Ended 'Stop-and-Frisk Era'?

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

All this week on the Brian Lehrer Show we're checking in on the de Blasio administration's progress on a variety of key issues, six months into his first term. We'll talk to advocacy groups about how the mayor has lived up to his campaign promises on the environment, crime, housing, and more. Friday, we'll hear from Deputy Mayor Anthony Shorris.

Monifa Bandele, organizer with the Malcolm X Grassroots Movement and Communities United for Police Reform discusses how Police Commissioner Bill Bratton and Mayor Bill de Blasio have changed policing tactics -- and what still needs to be done to improve community-police relations.

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Following Silver's Money

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

Assembly speaker Sheldon Silver disclosed that he earned between $650,000 and $750,000 from his law firm in 2013, almost double the prior year's pay. Editor Michael Aronson explains the Daily News' efforts to follow the revelations regarding Silver's income.

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Comments [21]

Will the Rockets and Missiles Stop Flying?

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

This morning Israel has accepted an Egypt-brokered cease fire, but reports are Hamas has rejected it. Steven Erlanger, London bureau chief and former Jerusalem bureau chief for The New York Times, discusses the latest in the Israel-Palestine conflict, and the US response.

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Comments [71]

Drones, Crime, and Sleepy CEOs

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

What happens when corporate and nonprofit executives actively encourage their employees to get more rest? Four CEOs who launched an experiment after WNYC's "Clock Your Sleep" Project share their results so far. Plus: Tracking Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver's money; an update on Israel and Palestine; the legality of flying drones in New York City; and assessing Mayor de Blasio on crime six months into his administration.

 

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