Streams

Which Side Are You On

Wednesday, July 18, 2012

American folk icon Pete Seeger reflects on his music and activism, and talks about a new book about his life. Plus: Chris Cillizza of The Washington Post takes your calls on who Mitt Romney should put on the ticket as his VP; why some area hospitals lack malpractice insurance; a round-up of transportation news; and it’s time to decide if you’re going to be a Nets fan.

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Seeger In His Own Words

Wednesday, July 18, 2012

→ Update: Pete Seeger died January 28th, 2014. We take your tributes and memories here.

Acclaimed singer and activist Pete Seeger talks about his life, the 100th birthday of Woody Guthrie, and the new book, Pete Seeger: His Life in His Own Words.

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Stephen Covey and Leadership Lit

Tuesday, July 17, 2012

Stephen Covey, the author of 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, died yesterday. Heidi Grant Halvorson of the Motivation Science Center at the Columbia University Business School, and author of Nine Things Successful People Do Differently, discusses the impact of Covey's book, and the world of leadership and self-help advice. Are you a Covey fan? Did 7 Habits help you? What other leadership or self-help books have you used, and why? Let us know!

→ Read the 7 Habits Below


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Rebuilding the Tappan Zee Bridge

Tuesday, July 17, 2012

Rockland County Executive Scott Vanderhoef and Westchester County Executive Rob Astorino talk about the reconstruction of the Tappan Zee Bridge.

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DC Check-In: Disclose Act and Farm Bill

Tuesday, July 17, 2012

Yesterday the Senate failed to advance the DISCLOSE Act, which would have required more transparency in political donations. Niels Lesniewski, editor of CQ Senate Watch, looks at the vote, and another key piece of legislation which did pass the Senate - but may get held up in Congress - the Farm bill.

→ Read the Bills (PDF): DISCLOSE Act | Senate Farm Bill

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Prosthetics at the Olympics

Tuesday, July 17, 2012

Alena Grabowski, a researcher at the University of Colorado and the Department of Veterans Affairs, talks about the South African runner Oscar Pistorius (the Blade Runner), who will be competing in the Olympics using prosthetic legs—and what his participation means for the Olympics, sports and prosthetics.

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Red Cross Declares: Syria Conflict is Civil War

Tuesday, July 17, 2012

David Scheffer, law professor and director of the Center for International Human Rights at Northwestern University School of Law and the author of All the Missing Souls: A Personal History of the War Crimes Tribunals, discusses the Red Cross announcement and what it means with regard to the Geneva Conventions, as well as the 10th anniversary of the International Criminal Court. Scheffer was the first U.S. Ambassador at Large for War Crimes Issues.

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Breaking Barriers

Tuesday, July 17, 2012

The Red Cross has declared the conflict in Syria a civil war. David Scheffer, director of the Center for International Human Rights at Northwestern University, explains why it matters and why the Red Cross holds so much weight. Plus: Glenn Reynolds, InstaPundit blogger, argues that there’s a higher education bubble like the housing bubble; a runner with prosthetic legs has been cleared to run in the Olympics – what does it mean for the future of competition?; and the reconstruction of the Tappan Zee Bridge.

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The Higher Education Bubble

Tuesday, July 17, 2012

Glenn Reynolds, law professor at the University of Tennessee, InstaPundit blogger and the author of The Higher Education Bubble, joins us to argue that the U.S. is currently experiencing a higher education bubble that mirrors the housing bubble and that college tuition costs have vastly outpaced inflation and family income.

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Unafraid of Aging

Monday, July 16, 2012

Linda Fried, dean of the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University, discusses her work and research into the intersection of aging and public health

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Open Phones: Weekend Activity Recommendations

Monday, July 16, 2012

Another summer weekend has come and gone. What movie, concert, restaurant, hike or bike trip or whatever did you see/do this weekend? Would you recommend it to other listeners?

→ Check out some of the Brian Lehrer Show's recommendations below!

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Comments [36]

Fixing The Future

Monday, July 16, 2012

David Brancaccio of Marketplace discusses “Fixing the Future,” his new feature documentary about a reinvention of the American economy.

Screenings: "Fixing the Future" will be screened at many theaters across the country on Wednesday, July 18, including the Chelsea Clearview.  Ticket information available here.

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Setting the Week in Politics

Monday, July 16, 2012

The 2012 campaign is focusing on Mitt Romney's record at Bain Capital, including questions about when he left the firm, and whether he had a part in practices that led to the loss of American jobs. Maggie Haberman, senior political writer at Politico, sets the week in politics.

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Open Phones: The Return of Anthony Weiner?

Monday, July 16, 2012

In an interview on this show last week, former Congressman Anthony Weiner said he wasn't planning any sort of return to politics. But the New York Post and New York Times have now reported on the roughly $4.5million Weiner has in the bank for a possible political candidacy.

Are you ready for an Anthony Weiner political comeback? Would you vote for him for Mayor in 2013, or would Public Advocate be a better fit? Let us know!

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An Existential Detective Story

Monday, July 16, 2012

Jim Holt, essayist, critic, and author of Why Does the World Exist?: An Existential Detective Story, discusses his new book, which investigates the age-old mystery of why is there something rather nothing.

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Existential Threats

Monday, July 16, 2012

David Brancaccio discusses his new documentary “Fixing the Future” about a reinvention of the American economy. Plus: Mailman School of Public Health Dean Linda Fried on the intersection of aging and public health; essayist Jim Holt on why the world exists; and the latest of the national presidential race.

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Explainer: The Tour de France

Friday, July 13, 2012

The three-week, 1,714 mile Tour de France ends on July 22nd in Paris. If you're a little confused about the rules, strategy, and etiquette of this famous bike race, you're not alone. We asked Nick Legan, technical editor at VeloNews, to answer some of our and our listeners' basic questions about the Tour on the Brian Lehrer Show on 7/11. See his answers below.

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Open Phones: Advice Roulette

Friday, July 13, 2012

Another installment of our regular feature: call in and ask a stranger for advice—as long as you give someone advice first. Give us a call at 212-433-9692!

Help answer two lingering questions for our callers:

+ How do you dispense of ivory that you feel guilty about owning?

+ What's a good family-friendly restaurant for an out-of-town visitor?

Post your thoughts below!

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Following Up: Are Swiss Bank Accounts All That Bad?

Friday, July 13, 2012

On Tuesday, Vanity Fair's Nicholas Shaxson spoke about his investigation into Mitt Romney's offshore accounts. Matt Welch, editor in chief of Reason magazine, follows up on the revelations, and why he thinks Swiss bank accounts are just fine.

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The Body Peace Treaty

Friday, July 13, 2012

Dana Edell, executive director of SPARK, and Carina Cruz and Emma Stydahar, high school students and members of the SPARK movement, discuss their petition to encourage Teen Vogue to follow in Seventeen magazine's footsteps and issue a Body Peace Treaty.

→ Read the Letter from Seventeen's Editor in Chief Below

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