Streams

Where's the Line on School Discipline?

Thursday, July 26, 2012

A New Jersey court has ruled that a high school went too far in disciplining students for out-of-school law-breaking. But it also created an exception for cases in which a student is put in harm's way, which has implications for New Jersey's anti-bullying legislation. Nancy Solomon, managing editor at New Jersey Public Radio, discusses the ruling.

What do you think? Can a school punish a student for behavior outside of school? What's the role of parents, law enforcement, and others? Where do you draw the line? Let us know!

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The Moral Idea That Influenced Everything

Thursday, July 26, 2012

R. Jay Magill, Jr., host for NPR Worldwide's Berlin Journal in Germany and the author of Sincerity, discusses the single ideal that pervades history, religion, art and politics and has inspired everything from religious wars to "hipster chic."

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Revisiting the Creative Class

Thursday, July 26, 2012

Richard Florida, director of the Martin Prosperity Institute at the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management and a senior editor at the Atlantic, is the author of The Rise of the Creative Class, 10th Anniversary EditionAs his book celebrates its tenth anniversary, Florida discusses how things have changed.

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Creative Solutions

Thursday, July 26, 2012

Ten years ago, Richard Florida wrote about the role of creativity in the economy in his influential book The Rise of the Creative Class. He discusses how American cities have changed in the past decade. Plus: NPR host R. Jay Magill, Jr. talks about the influence of the moral idea of sincerity in our politics and culture; and the July series on air-conditioning continues with Stan Cox.

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Washington Grills the Banks

Thursday, July 26, 2012

Yesterday in Washington, lawmakers from both sides of the aisle were talking about the structure and behavior of big banks. Tim Geithner offered testimony about the LIBOR rate-fixing scandal. And comments by a former Citigroup CEO led to buzz about the return of Glass-Steagall, which prevented banks from getting too big. Wall Street Journal economic policy reporter Damian Paletta discusses the latest.

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George Jefferson and Movin' on Up

Wednesday, July 25, 2012

Sherman Hemsley died yesterday. He was the actor who played George Jefferson on the TV shows "All in the Family" and "The Jeffersons"—which ran from 1975 to 1985. Michael Eric Dyson, sociology professor at Georgetown University and the author of many books, puts the character George Jefferson into context and takes your calls.

Listeners: Call us if you saw yourself or your family reflected in George Jefferson or the story of the Jeffersons. Did you define yourself against the Jeffersons? Call us at 212-433-9692 or comment here. 

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How Democrats Frame Issues

Wednesday, July 25, 2012

Elisabeth Wehling, political strategist and researcher of linguistics, and George Lakoff, Cognitive Science and Linguistics professor at the University of California, Berkley, discuss their book, The Little Blue Book: The Essential Guide to Thinking and Talking Democratic, and explain how Democrats can communicate their moral values clearly and forcefully in a way that sets them apart from their GOP counterparts.

 

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Will the LIBOR Scandal Lead to Arrests?

Wednesday, July 25, 2012

Matthew Goldstein, editor in charge of Wall Street Investigations for Reuters, discusses his reporting on possible arrests in London and in New York City over the LIBOR rate-fixing scandal.

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Bloomberg's Public Health and Safety

Wednesday, July 25, 2012

Joyce Purnick, WNYC political analyst, longtime New York Times political writer and author of Mike Bloomberg: Money, Power, Politics, discusses Mayor Bloomberg's policies on health and safety: sugary drink sizes; transfats; smoking; and guns.

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AG Schneiderman: New York's Drug War

Wednesday, July 25, 2012

Eric Schneiderman, New York State Attorney General and co-chair of the Residential Mortgage-Backed Securities Working Group, talks about his latest efforts to combat synthetic drugs and prescription drug abuse, plus other items on his agenda.

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Down the Road

Wednesday, July 25, 2012

New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman has initiatives to curb prescription drug and synthetic drug use. Plus: The LIBOR rate-fixing scandals could be leading to possible arrests. Matthew Goldstein of Reuters explains where, who and why. Then, what the soda ban hearings tell us about Mayor Bloomberg’s public health stance; and David Crist, historian for the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, on America’s conflict with Iran.

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The History of the U.S. Conflict with Iran

Wednesday, July 25, 2012

David Crist, senior historian for the Department of Defense and author of The Twilight War: The Secret History of America's Thirty-Year Conflict With Iran, discusses the United States' relationship with Iran and the latest developments in the Middle East.

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Media Manipulator

Tuesday, July 24, 2012

Ryan Holiday, media strategist, director of marketing at American Apparel and the author of Trust Me, I'm Lying: Confessions of a Media Manipulator, shares his insights on how to publicize and market using new media tools.

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WHAT? Dangerous Noise Levels in New York City

Tuesday, July 24, 2012

Cara Buckley, The New York Times reporter, talks about her reporting on noise levels in NYC stores, bars and restaurants - and how often the decibel levels exceed safety standards.

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Behind the Scenes at Federal Court

Tuesday, July 24, 2012

Frederic Block, federal judge on the United States District Court for the Eastern District of New York and the author of Disrobed: An Inside Look at the Life and Work of a Federal Trial Judge, talks about his life as a judge in some high profile cases in New York.

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Remember Sally Ride

Tuesday, July 24, 2012

Laura Helmuth, Slate science and health editor, formerly at Smithsonian magazine, talks about Sally Ride's place in history as the first American woman in space.

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What's NYC's Most Annoying Sound?

Tuesday, July 24, 2012

On the show today, we're talking about loud noises in the city. Now, we want to know what NYC's most annoying sound is. Nominate your sound, and once we have some suggestions then we'll put them in a bracket and let you vote. By the end of the week, we'll have crowned a winner!

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Comments [43]

NRA vs Big City Mayors

Tuesday, July 24, 2012

Adam Winkler, constitutional law professor at UCLA and the author of Gunfight: The Battle over the Right to Bear Arms in America, looks at why mass shootings, like the one in Aurora, Colo., don't lead to stricter gun control.

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Comments [59]

Behind the Scenes

Tuesday, July 24, 2012

Mass shootings have not led to more restrictive gun laws in the recent past. UCLA law professor and author Adam Winkler discusses why not and goes over the history of the influence of the National Rifle Association. Plus: Frederic Block, federal judge on the United States District Court for the Eastern District of New York, discusses his new book about life on the bench; and the media strategist and director of marketing for American Apparel, Ryan Holiday.

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Lessons from Canada with Paul Martin

Monday, July 23, 2012

Paul Martin, former Finance Minister (1993-2002) and Prime Minister of Canada (2003-2006), talks about why the Canadian economy is doing well, the policies he enacted, and what the U.S. could learn from Canada's budgeting past.

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