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Latest Episode / Friday, August 01, 2014 Edit This

Privacy, circa 2014

Are you okay with your car collecting data on your driving habits if it means a lower insurance rate? What about advertisers online? The Brian Lehrer Show tackles all sorts of privacy conundrums for the modern age. Plus: a debate between "Internet experts" Jaron Lanier and Jeff Jarvis.

Segments and Articles

Carnegie's Vision for Peace

Thursday, July 31, 2014

On the eve of the 100th anniversary of World War I, Joel Rosenthal of the Carnegie Council discusses the war and the assassination that ignited it. Plus, we talk about the legacy and ideals of people like Andrew Carnegie, who thought international arbitration and shared knowledge would lead to reconciliation and would eventually end all wars and other violent conflicts.

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It's (Not) Showtime: Why There's a Crackdown on Subway Performers

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Arrests of performers on the subway have more than quadrupled this year, according to The New York Times. Transit reporter Matt Flegenheimer and crime reporter J. David Goodman explain how the arrests of dancers is in keeping with NYPD Commissioner Bill Bratton's "Broken Windows" vision of policing, and take your calls on whether you think the performers should stay or go. Plus, Rayquan Perez, who dances with the group 2Live on the 4 and 2 lines, talks about what it's like to perform on the train. 

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A Subway Dancer Tells All

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Rayquan Perez is a 19-year-old dancer with 2Live, a group that performs on the 4 and 2 trains. He spoke to Brian about what it's like to flip and somersault through a moving subway car, and about the crackdown on dancers.

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Cory Booker and Rand Paul Join Forces on Prison Reform

Thursday, July 31, 2014

New Jersey Senator Cory Booker, a Democrat, talks about legislation he and Kentucky Senator Rand Paul, a Republican, have introduced, called the REDEEM Act, to reform the criminal justice system. REDEEM stands for Record Expungement Designed to Enhance Employment, and also aims to increase the age of criminal responsibility.

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Russell Simmons on How to Keep the Peace

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Russell Simmons, co-founder of Def Jam Records, founder of Phat Farm, and lots more, discusses the Keep The Peace grant program (through RushCard) he's leading that is designed to support community based organizations that are reducing violence in their neighborhoods. He's joined by Erica Ford, one of the recipients, to talk about her work with LIFE Camp, Inc.

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#tbt Salman Rushdie and Brian Lehrer

Thursday, July 31, 2014

It's 'Throwback Thursday' and we're marking the 25th anniversary of the show this fall with a dip into the Brian Lehrer Show archives every week. This week, we highlight part of Brian's conversation with author Salman Rushdie in 2002, reflecting on fear and civil liberties after 9/11. "The issue of how you reconcile the demands of a free society with the demands of security: that's going to be the argument that we're all going to be having for the next ten or fifteen years," Rushdie said in 2002. Well, that's now.

You can find Brian's whole interview with Rushdie in '02 (they discussed borders, non-fiction, and Bruce Springsteen) right here. 

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Cory Booker, Russell Simmons, and Visions of Peace

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Sen. Cory Booker is teaming up with Sen. Rand Paul on the REDEEM Act, a criminal justice reform bill. Booker explains the details of the legislation. Plus: Russell Simmons on Keep the Peace, a grant program he’s leading to help neighborhood organizations that work to reduce violence; cops are cracking down on acrobatic subway dancers (“it’s showtime!”); a request for listeners to call us from the weirdest place possible; a look back at Andrew Carnegie’s vision for peace; and one film critic shares his 54 favorite movies.  

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A Decade-by-Decade Guide To Your Favorite Movies

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Kenneth Turan, film critic for The Los Angeles Times and Morning Edition and the author of Not to be Missed: Fifty Four Favorites from a Lifetime of Film (Public Affairs, 2014), talks about what makes his favorite films great, from the silent era to recent features. Do you have a favorite movie that rarely makes the "Best Of" lists? What's your pick for the 55th movie to add to the list? Check out listener suggestions and Turan's list below, and be sure to catch him at the Museum of the Moving Image in Astoria on August 3rd. He'll be screening the film Chinatown (directed by Roman Polanski) followed by a discussion and a Q&A.

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Call Us From the Weirdest Place Possible

Thursday, July 31, 2014

We've had callers to this show from all over the world, from moving trains, while getting ticketed for jaywalking, and even, once, the tub. We challenge you to call in from the weirdest place possible. 

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Has Your Felony Conviction Ruined Your Life?

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Senators Cory Booker and Rand Paul are teaming on a bill that would make life easier for those who've served their time for non-violent felony convictions, from help with finding a job to stricter regulations about what remains on someone's record. Paul has also spoken out about wanting to change the laws regarding voting eligibility for non-violent felons in federal elections. We take calls from anyone who's served time about what life is like as an ex-con, and what the government can and should do to help.

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How Worried Do You Need To Be About Ebola?

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Nearly 700 people have died from an outbreak of the Ebola virus in West Africa. One man, an American, died in Lagos after having been infected by the virus in Liberia. With borders closing and concern about infected passengers on planes, Stephen Morse, epidemiologist from the the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University, explains how an outbreak like this one can be contained and why it is unlikely that Ebola will spread to the U.S.

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Paid Sick Leave: Day One

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

New York's Paid Sick Leave law goes into effect today. Julie Menin, Commissioner of the New York City Department of Consumer Affairs, has been helping businesses prepare for the effort. She answers last-minute questions and discusses what impact the law will have on NYC's workers.

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What We Talk About When We Talk About Love...and Money

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Dealing with money in relationships is often stressful. For the new episode out today, Anna Sale, host of WNYC's podcast Death Sex & Moneytalked to several couples trying to balance their checkbooks with their love life -- from a couple that thought they had money all figured out until they had a daughter and one partner stayed home; to an engaged couple that broke it off after they couldn't agree to the terms of a pre-nup.

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Is HIPAA Being Used To Harm - Not Help - Patients?

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

In a recent article for ProPublica, senior reporter Charles Ornstein examines three case studies of medical centers citing HIPAA - the 1996 law mean to protect patients - in ways that protect their own interests and privacy. Ornstein joins us to explain what HIPAA actually covers and explain what your rights are as a patient.

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Explaining Today's "Bounce-Back" GDP Report

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

After the U.S. economy shrank in the 1st quarter, today's report shows 4% expansion -- but with some important caveats and revisions. Charlie Herman, business and economics editor for WNYC News, breaks down the numbers and what to expect from the many other economic indicators out this week.

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Assessing Worries: Money and Love, Ebola Outbreaks, Privacy

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

New York City's new Sick Leave Law starts today. We'll hear what it means for you. Plus: It’s a big week for major economic indicators; a law that’s meant to protect patients may actually be used more to protect medical centers; containing West Africa’s Ebola outbreak; voting rights for felons; and stories about the anxiety and stress of dealing with money in relationships. 

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The Truth Behind the Israeli Kidnapped Teens Story

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

The conflict in Gaza continues, and the roots of this summer's violence can, in many ways, be traced to the kidnapping and killing of three Israeli teens in June. Sheera Frenkel, Buzzfeed Middle East correspondent, talks about her reporting that shows the teens were kidnapped by a "splinter" group not formally affiliated with Hamas, the off-and-on negotiations for a ceasefire, and what comes next.

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Your Office Chair is Killing You

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

James A. Levine, co-director of the Mayo Clinic/Arizona State University Obesity Solutions Initiative, author of Get Up!: Why Your Chair is Killing You and What You Can Do About It (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014), and the inventor of the treadmill desk, explains why sitting is bad for health and longevity and how to add more movement to your workday.

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Ethnic Identity and Plastic Surgery

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Maureen O'Connor, columnist for New York Magazine and The Cut, explores the issues around the rise in plastic surgery among Asian-Americans, Hispanics and African-Americans and what it means for ethnic identity.

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What They're Gonna Do About the MTA

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

The MTA has set up a Transportation Reinvention Commission, an advisory board on how the system can deal with growing ridership, climate change, and other challenges. Ray LaHood, former U.S. transportation secretary and now co-chair of the MTA's Reinvention Commission, talks about how they're taking public comment and what comes next.

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