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Latest Episode / Thursday, April 24, 2014 Edit This

The Rules They Are A-Changin’

Home ownership is still a major part of the American dream. But after you crunch the numbers, is it even worth it? Plus: an argument that government is ineffective because of outdated rules and regulations; and what happens in a year with AmeriCorps’ City Year program. 

Segments and Articles

Should We Care About Owning a Home?

Thursday, April 24, 2014

Americans still view home-ownership as an important investment and a key part of the American dream. But is it time to move past our ownership fixation? Catherine Rampell, opinion and economics columnist at The Washington Post, broke down some of the latest numbers in her recent column.

 

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Comments [77]

Airbnb and the Law

Thursday, April 24, 2014

Airbnb, the short-term apartment renting web-based service, is trying to navigate its way through a legal gray zone, past subpoenas and taxes. Matt Flamm, senior reporter at Crain's New York, updates the latest developments.

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Comments [25]

US Government's Fatal Flaw - Regulations

Thursday, April 24, 2014

Philip K. Howard, founder and chair of Common Good and the author of The Rule of Nobody: Saving America from Dead Laws and Broken Government (W. W. Norton & Company, 2014), argues that government is broken, not because of politics, but a reliance on anachronistic rules and regulations at the expense of common sense.

 

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Comments [14]

A Year With City Year

Thursday, April 24, 2014

City Year is part of the AmeriCorps program and will be celebrating 25 years next month. Erica Hamilton, vice president and executive director of City Year New York, explains how fellows spend their time and what communities get from the program. Plus, she'll take your calls.

 

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Comments [3]

Goodbye Net Neutrality?

Thursday, April 24, 2014

The FCC proposed new rules that would leave the concept of net neutrality all but dead. David Carr, media columnist and culture reporter for the New York Times and Nancy Scola, a reporter who covers the intersections of technology, politics, and policy for publications like Reuters, the Washingtonian, and theAtlantic.com, discuss this and the case Aereo is making before the Supreme Court.

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Comments [27]

Why Our Middle Class is Losing

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

New York Times reporter and editor David Leonhardt discusses the recent data that show the U.S. middle class is no longer the wealthiest in the world. Also, a little on what he's planning for The Upshot, The New York Times's new data-driven site.

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Comments [54]

Supreme Court Takes on Affirmative Action, Political Lying, More

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

It's a busy week at the Supreme Court. Yesterday they issued a decision upholding Michigan's right to ban affirmative action in college admission practices. The court also heard a case about the Internet TV provider Aereo, that could have a big impact on broadcast and online media and arguments about whether states can make it a crime to lie about candidates during a political campaign. Dahlia Lithwick, senior editor at Slate, rounds up the decisions and arguments, and takes your calls about what comes next.

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Comments [54]

Clock Your Sleep: Adults

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

For all of you in your 20's, 30's, 40's and 50's, you won't be surprised to learn that work emails are keeping many up past their bedtimes. Dr. Carl Bazil, professor of neurology and director of the Division of Epilepsy and Sleep at Columbia University's College of Physicians and Surgeons, explains that even though work emails aren't usually emergencies, your brain thinks they are so you remain wide awake. Russell Sanna, executive director of the Division of Sleep Medicine at Harvard Medical School, has some ideas about how your company could implement better sleep health policies to help. Can you imagine email-free weekends? Hear the discussion about the pressures of being a grown-up and how your sleep is affected.

 

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Comments [19]

Wildlife During the Longer Winter

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

We're not the only species that felt the unusually long and bitter winter. WNYC reporter Stephen Nessen, explains how rats were forced to eat trees. Asian tiger mosquitoes were also hit hard. And new kinds of birds are in the area. What signs of a long winter are you seeing in the city's natural world? Birders, which species are you seeing? Wildlife watchers and gardeners, what other signs of the polar vortex are you observing as spring begins?

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Comments [8]

Getting Into College: Accepted

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

Jacques Steinberg, senior vice president with Say Yes to Education, a national non-profit organization, and author of The Gatekeepers: Inside the Admissions Process of a Premier College, offers insight and advice for H.S. seniors and their parents facing the May 1 deadline to commit to a college choice -- including what factors to weigh in the decision, navigating financial aid and whether "double depositing" is fair play.

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Comments [8]

Stuck In the Middle With You

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

Canada’s middle class is now wealthier than ours. David Leonhardt of The New York Times explains the analysis (and the new Times data platform). Plus: how to understand your college financial aid letter; sleep through the life cycle; and news from the Supreme Court.

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The Climate Crisis Can Be Solved

Tuesday, April 22, 2014

In the wake of the UN's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's climate report, Steven A. Cohen, executive director of Columbia University's Earth Institute, talks about the complexities of climate change and the solutions offered in the report, and offers his (optimistic) thoughts on how the world will adapt to a warming planet.

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Comments [17]

Earth Day Family Meeting: Let’s Fix This Mess

Tuesday, April 22, 2014

It’s the 44th anniversary of Earth Day, yet the climate change news is only getting worse. So we're convening a family meeting to talk about the state of the environment. No politics, no hysteria, just science. What’s already happened, how it can be fixed and where you fit in. The Earth Institute’s Steven Cohen joins us and a climate scientist from the IPCC takes your global warming questions. Plus: Oysters are back in New York Harbor.

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Your Personal Environmentalism

Tuesday, April 22, 2014

To kick off our Earth Day family meeting, we want to hear what environmentalism means to you. Are you constantly conflicted by your energy use? What do you do personally to try to help - or at least not harm - the environment? What fears do you have for the future and what trade-offs do you make?

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Comments [21]

Bring Back the Oysters

Tuesday, April 22, 2014

The Billion Oyster Project is restoring oyster beds to New York Harbor. Billion Oyster Project Director Pete Malinowski, also aquaculture program director at the New York Harbor School, and his students, Beni Nedrick and Erin Nolan, explain why it's beneficial for the health of the waterways, marine life and how the shellfish might protect coastal areas from future storm surges.

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Comments [8]

What's It Like Where You're From?

Tuesday, April 22, 2014

If the whole world doesn't get on board to curb emissions, the negative effects of climate change may overwhelm the earth anyway. After all, global warming knows no international boundaries. We want to hear from immigrants - how is climate change addressed in your home country? Or is it development at any cost?

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Comments [9]

Ask a Climatologist

Tuesday, April 22, 2014

Katharine Mach, co-director of science for the IPCC Working Group II based out of the Carnegie Institution for Science's Department of Global Ecology at Stanford University, is a scientist who worked on the latest IPCC report. She answers your questions about the earth and humans' vulnerability to climate change, what's already happened, will happen in the future and how we might fix this mess. Plus, anything else you've ever wanted to ask a climate scientist.

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Comments [37]

God and You: A Two-Hour Special

Monday, April 21, 2014

As the holy weeks of Judaism and Christianity come to an end, we ask: how do you picture God? How do you pray? And how does your belief in God connect to your daily life? Plus: Karen Armstrong, Krista Tippett, Mark Epstein, the Rev. James Martin and others join us for this special family meeting on God, faith, prayer and ritual. 

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Roundtable: God in Our Everyday Lives

Monday, April 21, 2014

Our family meeting continues with a roundtable of thinkers from all types of religious backgrounds on how God connects with our everyday lives. With: Krista Tippett, host of On BeingLisa Anderson, director of women’s multifaith education at Auburn Theological SeminaryMark Epstein, a psychiatrist in private practice in New York City and the author of The Trauma of Everyday Life (Penguin Press, 2013); and Gadadhara Pandit Dasa, monk, lecturer and the first-ever Hindu chaplain for Columbia University, New York University, and Union Theological Seminary, and the author of Urban Monk: Exploring Karma, Consciousness, and the Divine (Conscious Living, LLC, 2013).

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Comments [27]

Getting to Know Jesus

Monday, April 21, 2014

James Martin, SJ, a Jesuit priest, editor at large of America magazine, and author of Jesus: A Pilgrimage (HarperOne, 2014), talks about the historical and spiritual Jesus.

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Comments [31]