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Air every weekend - Saturdays at 6AM on 93.9 FM and 7am and 2PM on AM 820. Sundays at 8PM on AM 820 and at other times as scheduled.

Join us for a curated presentation of special programs from public radio producers across the country. 

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Movie Date Presents: Oscar...Totally Naked

Wednesday, February 20, 2013

"Oscar...Totally Naked" is an Oscar special hosted by Kristen Meinzer of The Takeaway and Rafer Guzman of Newsday. Listen to this hour-long spectacular, which pulls back the velvet curtain on Hollywood's biggest night.

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Emancipation 150: The State of the Black Economy

Saturday, February 16, 2013

Dr. Cornel West, joins CNN financial contributor Ryan Mack to discuss the history of generational poverty and wealth and the current state of the economy for African Americans. In 2013, we inaugurated the first black president for his second term into the highest office in the United States. Yet the 2010 Census Bureau showed that the median black household made 59.8 percent as much as the median white household; 40 percent of black students fail to graduate high school on time; and 27.4 percent of blacks live in poverty compared to the overall poverty rate of 15 percent. Award-winning author and radio host, Farai Chideya leads this interactive dialogue.

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Emancipation 150: From Emancipation to the Great Migration

Friday, February 15, 2013

Through conversation and performance, take a look at the historic proclamation within the unsettled, turbulent contexts of the Civil War, Reconstruction, the Jim Crow Era and the Great Migration. Co-moderated by award-winning writer Carl Hancock Rux and Robin Morris, Director of National Programs at the National Constitution Center. Panelists include Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Isabel Wilkerson (The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America’s Great Migration); Dr. Khalil Muhammad (Director of The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture); Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Dr. Eric Foner (The Fiery Trial: Abraham Lincoln and American Slavery) and Dr. Jim Downs (Sick from Freedom: African American Illness and Suffering During the Civil War and Reconstruction).

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State of the Re:Union- Who Is This Man?

Saturday, February 09, 2013

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I have a Dream” speech has become the shorthand of the Civil Rights Movement-- but we might never have heard it, if it were not for another man, who’s largely been forgotten by history: Bayard Rustin. In this program hour, we explore the life and legacy of Mr. Rustin, a black, gay, Quaker who brought Gandhian non-violent protest to the Civil Rights movement in America.

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Maya Angelou’s Black History Month Special

Saturday, February 09, 2013

As African Americans continue to be acknowledged by their communities, our country and internationally, this hour-long Black History Month radio program features milestone conversations with Oprah Winfrey, Kofi Annan, Jennifer Hudson, Regina Taylog and Alicia Keys.

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WNYC Black History Month 2013

Tuesday, February 05, 2013

WNYC celebrates Black History month with programming throughout the month of February. This year we have two programs that mark the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation from a live series taking place in WNYC’s Jerome L. Greene Performance Space.

Co-moderated by award-winning writer Carl Hancock Rux and Robin Morris, From Emancipation to the Great Migration takes a look at the historic proclamation within the turbulent contexts of the Civil War, Reconstruction, the Jim Crow Era and the Great Migration.  The State of the Black Economy takes a deep dive into the history of generational poverty and wealth and the current state of the economy for African Americans. Joined by Dr. Cornel West, and CNN financial contributor Ryan Mack, award winning author and radio host, Farai Chideya leads the conversation.  And WQXR’s Terrance McKnight hosts I, Too, Sing America: Music in the Life of Langston Hughes. As he did with his poetry, Langston Hughes used music to denounce war, combat segregation and restore human dignity in the face of Jim Crow.

The New York Public Radio Archives has pulled together some of the department's leading preservation work concerning African-American history.  Listen to previously unreleased interviews with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and a rare 1965 interview with Malcolm X, plus much more. Explore the Archives here.

See more Black History programming here

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State of the Re:Union: Jacksonville, Florida

Saturday, January 26, 2013

Jacksonville, Florida, is a lot of things: a military town. A church town. A beach town. And it can be all those things because Jacksonville is the largest city in the whole country: 841 acres of sprawl, highways and strip malls dotted with tiny, unique neighborhoods. How does a place this huge and diverse lurch forward to keep pace with the rest of the country? The quick answer: often, it doesn’t. But once in a while, in small surprising ways, this place can be an incubator for innovation. In host Al Letson’s hometown episode, SOTRU asks: is Jacksonville is moving backward, stuck in neutral, or shifting towards progress?

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State of the Re:Union: Summer in Sanctuary - An American Graduate Special

Saturday, January 19, 2013

Every day in America, more than 7,000 students drop out of school. In a State of the Re:Union first, this episode combines radio drama and documentary to explore America’s dropout epidemic through the intimate story of one man’s attempt to make a difference in the lives of a group of high-risk kids. Based on the celebrated off-broadway show by SOTRU host Al Letson, this episode chronicles Letson’s journey teaching at a summer camp at the Sanctuary on 8th Street, a community center in an economically challenged neighborhood of Jacksonville, Florida.

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State of the Re:Union: Internet Communities

Saturday, January 12, 2013

At this point in the 21st century, it’s kind of impossible to talk about community-building without, at some point, talking about the internet. The way we meet people, establish connections, maintain our relationships and fight for what we believe in has been radically transformed by the web—and it’s still transforming.
But often, when we’re talking about these changes, the focus is either on pure enthusiasm about the possibilities presented by the limitlessness of the web, or anxiety about online connections replacing physical ones.

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State of the Re:Union: Tucson AZ

Saturday, January 05, 2013

Tucson sits in the borderlands, the desert landscape where America and Mexico meet.  This place is crisscrossed by boundaries, visible and invisible—from the U.S. border wall that cuts the Sonoran desert in half, to live-wire political divides in Tucson itself.   In this episode, we tell stories about what happens when people cross borders, risking their lives and their reputations to take a chance on the other side.

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Hanukkah Lights 2012

Saturday, December 08, 2012

Airs Saturday, December 8 at noon on AM820 and 3pm on 93.9FM

A perennial NPR favorite, Hanukkah Lights features Hanukkah stories and memoirs written by acclaimed authors expressly for the show, as read by NPR's Susan Stamberg and Murray Horwitz.

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Culture Shock 1913

Friday, November 30, 2012

WNYC’s Sara Fishko marks 100 years since 1913, a landmark year in global culture, through three “shocking” Modernist events:  The exhibition of modern art in New York’s Lexington Avenue Armory; the concert of atonal music in Vienna that sparked a near-riot; and Stravinsky and Nijinsky’s Rite of Spring premiere in Paris that sparked another near-riot!   Culture Shock 1913 looks at the years of change and uncertainty in the early 20th century that led artists, writers, musicians and thinkers to find dramatic new forms of expression.

Explore more about Culture Shock 1913 and to listen to the whole show here.

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Third Coast International Audio Festival

Thursday, November 22, 2012

Airing: November 22, 8pm on AM820, 93.9FM and NJPR

The Third Coast International Audio Festival brings the best new documentaries produced worldwide to the national airwaves in a special two-hour program. Best of the Best: The 2012 Third Coast Festival Broadcast. This year's special showcases the winners of the 2012 TC/RHDF Competition, interviews with the winning producers, and highlights from our 2012 Third Coast Awards Ceremony hosted by the Kitchen Sisters and featuring the band The Hudson Branch. Gwen Macsai, host of the Third Coast's Re:sound, and an award-winning writer/humorist, will guide listeners through this two-hour tour of the world's best new documentaries.

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Intelligence Squared US

Saturday, November 10, 2012

End of Life Care

BROADCAST SCHEDULE: Saturday 6am, 93.9FM, Saturday 2pm on  AM 820 and Sunday, 8pm on AM 820

Just because we can extend life, should we? The U.S. is expected to spend $2.8 trillion on health care in 2012. Medicare alone will cost taxpayers $590 billion, with over 25% going toward patients in their last year of life. If health care is a scarce resource, limited by its availability and our ability to pay for it, should government step in to ration care, deciding whose life is worth saving? In other words, how much is an extra month of life worth? The debaters are Dr. Art Kellermann, Peter Singer, Sally Pipes, and Ken Connor.

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Lewis Black in Conversation

Sunday, November 04, 2012

This fall, Grammy Award winning comedian and America's favorite curmudgeon, Lewis Black returns to Broadway. He sat down with Elliott Forrest, Peabody Award winning host of WQXR and WNYC, in a free-wheeling conversation in The Greene Space.  They discussed Lewis' life, his comedy, the world around us that he rails about and the upcoming election.

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Intelligence Squared US

Saturday, October 27, 2012

Is Arab democracy good for the US?

BROADCAST SCHEDULE: Saturday 6am, 93.9FM and Sunday, 8pm on AM 820

The popular uprisings of the Arab Spring have left a leadership void that Islamist parties have been quick to fill. Will the Islamists, who once embraced violence, slowly liberalize as they face the difficulties of state leadership? Or will it mean the growth of anti-Americanism and radicalization in the region? The Panelists are Reuel Marc Gerecht, Daniel Pipes, Brian Katulis, and Dr. M. Zuhdi Jasser.

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Intelligence Squared US

Saturday, October 20, 2012

Are Super PACS Good For Democracy?

The product of two court decisions, Citizens United and SpeechNow.org v. FEC, Super PAC spending is on course to make 2012 the most expensive presidential election in history. These supercharged political action committees may spend and receive unlimited amounts of money from individuals, corporations, and unions to advocate for political candidates, as long as they are independent of the candidates' campaigns. How have Super PACs changed the political landscape? Are they good for democracy? The Debaters are David Keating, Jacob Sullum, Trevor Potter, and Jonathan Soros.

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The Power and Politics of New Energy Frontiers

Saturday, October 13, 2012

In this hour of BURN, Alex Chadwick takes us to the next frontier of energy development, introducing us to people and ideas that may help the next president propel us to energy independence.

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The Power of One Election and Americas Energy Future

Saturday, October 06, 2012

President Barack Obama and his opponent, Mitt Romney, share one broad policy goal – greater energy independence for the United States. They differ on how to achieve it. In this hour of BURN, host Alex Chadwick goes to the sometime swing state of Pennsylvania to examine fracking, the politically volatile exploration technology that has made natural gas the single most important element remaking our energy economy. We also go to Michigan, where voters will say yea or nay to wind power – praised by many democrats as a renewable energy source well worth supporting; criticized by many republicans as not viable in the free marketplace.

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American RadioWorks: Keyboard College

Saturday, September 29, 2012

Digital technologies and the Internet are changing how many Americans go to college. From online learning to simulation programs to smart-machine mentors, the 21st-century student will be taught in fundamentally new ways. In this documentary, Stephen Smith asks whether these innovations can help more people get access to higher education and bring down the cost of college without sacrificing learning.

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