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Air every weekend - Saturdays at 6AM on 93.9 FM and 2PM on AM 820. Sundays at 7AM and 8PM on AM 820 and at other times as scheduled.

Join us for a curated presentation of special programs from public radio producers across the country. 

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Freakonomics Radio: Spite Happens

Wednesday, June 18, 2014

This episode of Freakonomics Radio explores our surprising propensity for spite. We discover the gruesome etymology of the phrase “cut off your nose to spite your face” (it involves medieval nuns). Host Stephen Dubner talks to economist Benedikt Herrmann about “money-burning” lab experiments, in which people often choose to surrender some of their own cash in order to take money away from other participants.

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Freakonomics Radio: How Much Does Your Name Matter?

Tuesday, June 17, 2014

When Harvard professor Latanya Sweeney typed her name in Google one day, she noticed something strange: an ad with the heading: “Latanya Sweeney, Arrested?” But she had never been arrested -- and neither had the only other Latanya Sweeney in the U.S. So why did the ad suggest so?

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Freakonomics Radio: Women Are Not Men

Monday, June 16, 2014

Women are different from men, by a lot, in some key areas. For example, the data show that women don’t: drown, edit Wikipedia, commit crime, or file patents at anywhere near the same rate as men do. How else are women different? They have made significant economic gains over the past 30 years and yet they are less happy now.

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State of the Re:Union: Interior Alaska: Frontier Community

Saturday, June 14, 2014

Interior Alaska can be a forbidding place. Because of its isolation and climate, the region has long attracted people drawn to the challenges and opportunities of a wild, remote place. In this episode of State Of The Re:Union, meet a number of athletes, journalists, scientists, and activists who embody the spirit of Interior Alaska through their grit, determination, and iconoclasm.

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America Abroad: The Power of Art in a Changing Middle East

Friday, June 13, 2014

Film, music and art are often the best ways to capture the will and the mood of the people in times of turmoil. Art sometimes has the power to move millions where politics fails. In this episode of America Abroad, hear about some of the most prominent artistic voices in the Middle East, North Africa and South Asia.

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Music is a Holy Art: A Richard Strauss Celebration

Friday, June 06, 2014

WQXR

In celebration of the 150th anniversary of Richard Strauss's birth, this hour-long special explores his dedication to his art, as reflected in his grand orchestral works and his unforgettable operas.

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State of the Re:Union: Salt Lake City, UT: Updating Tradition

Friday, June 06, 2014

When Mormon pioneers rolled into the Salt Lake Valley in 1847, they brought with them a new theology, a short but intense history of persecution, and dreams of a new kind of society. 166 years later, Salt Lake City remains deeply influenced by Mormon culture, but defies easy categorization. With a large and politically active gay scene, one of the biggest Polynesian populations in the country, and a steady stream of new migrants, the city is full of vibrant contradiction—and sometimes conflict.

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State of the Re:Union: Hawai'i: The Legacy of Sugar

Wednesday, May 28, 2014

For many Americans, Hawai'i is a tropical playground, the place of surf, sun and dream vacations. Behind the tourist façade, though, is one of the most unique multicultural states in the nation, one still dealing with the complicated legacy of the circumstances under which it become part of this country.

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State of the Re:Union: The Sorting Of America

Friday, May 23, 2014

The U.S. has always been a country shaped by migration, dating back to the days of the pioneers making their way West. But recently, this country has been seeing a different kind of migration: one motivated not by economic necessity, but by lifestyle choices. More and more, people are moving to places where they're surrounded by others like themselves.

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Millennials Don't Stand A Chance

Saturday, May 17, 2014

Millennials have found themselves to be quite the popular subject in modern media. The world is changing quickly, and the millennial generation has seemed to keep up with the pace better than other age groups. The divide between younger and older is becoming apparent in all facets of life -- and this change has not always been met with open arms.

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America Abroad: The Consequences of Shrinking America's Military

Friday, May 09, 2014

The Pentagon has announced plans to shrink the U.S. military to pre-World War II levels following the end of the war in Iraq and the continued withdrawal from Afghanistan. On this edition of America Abroad, hear reactions to a smaller U.S. military from allies in Asia, Europe, and the Middle East about whether America's ability to advance its interests is compromised.

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Shake It: A Modern Polaroid Love Story

Thursday, May 08, 2014

WNYC

For a moment, the Polaroid looked like it was on its way out, forever to be forgotten. But in recent years, it has become clear inspiration for digital photography apps and memes, reigniting a nostalgic devotion across the world.

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TRBQ: What Is A Good Death?

Saturday, May 03, 2014

The topic of death carries immense weight and affects every one of us in a different way. Some find the prospect of moving on from this life to be a scary, unwelcome feeling. Others feel at peace knowing there is an end, and that encourages them to live in a different way. On this episode of The Really Big Questions, we explore the idea of what a “good death” means.

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Harvey Fierstein Makes His Return To Broadway

Sunday, April 27, 2014

Harvey Fierstein is back with his first new play in nearly 30 years. "Casa Valentina" is the story of a group of heterosexual men who gather in an inconspicuous bungalow colony in the 1960s to discreetly and safely dress and act as women.

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TRBQ: Why Does Music Move Us?

Saturday, April 26, 2014

Music is one of the most ubiquitous forces in the world, permeating every culture without explanation as to why we are so affected by its touch. There's a reason why humans create music and why it's so heavily embedded into our lives -- but that reason isn't too clear. In this episode of "The Really Big Questions," musicians and researchers will attempt to explain the impact of music on the human brain.

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Real America: Guns In America

Saturday, April 19, 2014

The debate of gun control in the United States has never been so prevalent than now. Local tragedies more frequently turn into major national news stories, and American culture has become inundated with images of violence. There's two distinct sides to the conversation on gun control. In this special from the BBC World Service, hear from individuals and experts addressing the issue both from deeply personal and factual viewpoints.

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“Why This Night?” A Passover Special

Sunday, April 13, 2014

Larry Josephson, a secular Jew who now wants to know more about the religion of his grandparents, asks Rabbi Ismar Schorsch to explain the meaning of Passover. Dr. Schorsch tells Larry the story of Passover -- its history, rituals and foods, and the origins and structure of the Seder. The music of Passover, sung by some of the best cantors and choirs in the world, is woven in and out of the conversation.

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A Musical Feast for Passover with Itzhak Perlman

Saturday, April 12, 2014

The springtime Jewish holiday of Passover is about liberation from slavery in ancient Egypt. In this one-hour special from WQXR, violinist Itzhak Perlman shares Passover music from many traditions, plus songs and memories from his childhood in Israel. The program draws its shape from the Passover seder and, like that ancient family ritual, the music gets progressively giddier as the show moves along.

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America Abroad: Afghanistan After Karzai

Friday, April 11, 2014

Afghanistan has been led for the past decade by President Hamid Karzai. Once his second, five-year term ends, many are left wondering what the future will be for US-Afghan relations, women's rights and education, reconciliation with the Taliban, and the overall progress of peace and stability in the region.

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Adapting To Climate Change

Monday, April 07, 2014

No matter what you believe about climate change, there seems to be many more extreme weather events occurring more frequently. These natural disasters upset lives and destroy property, leading to escalating clean-up and reconstruction costs. "Adapting To Climate Change" explores the plans that engineers, scientists, government officials, business leaders, NGOs, and community groups around the world are making to deal with future catastrophic events and shifting weather patterns.

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