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Specials

Air every weekend - Saturdays at 6AM on 93.9 FM and 2PM on AM 820. Sundays at 7AM and 8PM on AM 820 and at other times as scheduled.

Join us for a curated presentation of special programs from public radio producers across the country. 

Recently in Specials

Utopia

Saturday, October 16, 2010

Snap Judgment searches for that perfect place, just around the bend, our Shangri-La. For those lucky few who have found their utopia, they also discover it's surrounded by enemies clamoring to tear it down.

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Warning Signs

Saturday, October 09, 2010

Before the universe knocks you upside the head, it usually gives you a sign. Snap Judgment tells stories of people who pay heed to those signs...or not.

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Something Ain't Right

Saturday, October 02, 2010

Your brain doesn't quite know what's going on. But your body knows that something's up. Your breathing gets shallow, your palms start to sweat. Do you run--or watch things play out? In this episode, Snap Judgment does both.

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Drop Everything

Saturday, September 25, 2010

We know you're busy. Real busy. Doing all that "stuff." And after you do the stuff, they want you to document the stuff. Then you better file the stuff. But then, you get the midnight phone call. In a moment, everything changes. Turns out, all that stuff doesn't matter. 'Cause it's "Drop Everything" time.

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Tales from the Library

Saturday, September 18, 2010

The whole range of human experience isn't just catalogued in a library - it actually takes place inside. Roam the stacks with Snap Judgment, and we'll teach you to hypnotize your friends, jump start your career and stop fanatics from burning your books.

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Danger to Self

Saturday, September 11, 2010

This week on Snap Judgment, host Glynn Washington drops stories of people who are their own worst enemy. Push through the hallways of a psychiatric ward, obsess over a late night talk radio host and then get ready to run for your life.

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Remember Us Unto Life

Sunday, September 05, 2010

Host Larry Josephson, a secular Jew who wants to know more about the religion of his grandparents, asks simple questions of Rabbi Ismar Schorsch, Chancellor Emeritus of the Jewish Theological Seminary. Rabbi Schorsch talks about the history, liturgy and meaning in our time of these ancient holidays, in ways that are accessible but sophisticated and historically accurate. The conversation is illustrated and elevated with music of the High Holidays.

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Humankind: Barely Getting By

Saturday, September 04, 2010

What's it like for people in low-paying full-time jobs, with no savings, behind on their bills, sometimes lining up at food pantries, even shelters? In this Human Media documentary, we explore the lives of the working poor with the tale of a single mom, raising five children, working two jobs, who got sick trying to advance her education, and the story of a full-time worker in his sixties who has no savings.

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Testing Teachers

Saturday, August 28, 2010

Kids need good teachers. It's something people know in their gut, but it's only recently that researchers have begun developing ways to measure the quality of teachers. What they're learning is shaking up schools and leading education reformers to call for radical changes in the way teachers are trained and evaluated - and the way they are hired and fired too. This documentary will take us to some of the nation's poorest schools to understand why teacher quality is fast becoming the next frontier in the fight to equalize educational opportunity in the United States.

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War on Poverty: From the Great Society to the Great Recession

Saturday, August 21, 2010

"War on Poverty" will blend contemporary storytelling with rich archival audio to examine the modern face of poverty, and to ask why LBJ's dream of a Great Society is still beyond reach.

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The Retooling of the American Auto Industry: Part II

Saturday, August 14, 2010

In this second part of Shifting Gears, host Craig Fahle talks with The Story's Dick Gordon about the South as the new home of the US auto industry, with all of its complex social, labor and financial questions. Then we visit Julie Kredens from Louisville Public Media for a tale of two vehicle plants and how their fortunes have hit the pockets of auto workers nearby. Finally, a glimpse into the future and where auto designers think consumers want to go.

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No Brother of Mine

Saturday, August 14, 2010

To protect the public from sexual violence, the U.S. has enacted get-tough laws targeting released sex offenders. Many were inspired by high-profile cases in which children were raped and killed by strangers, a heinous albeit rare crime. Since 2006, we’ve interviewed leading experts and victims’ advocates about the impact of these laws. 

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The Retooling of the American Auto Industry: Part I

Saturday, August 07, 2010

In this first part of Shifting Gears, host Craig Fehle examines the challenge of retraining a work force that built the US car industry. Could the midwest become one of the centers of the emerging electric auto industry; we'll check in with Bill Anderson at KCUR who has the story of one emerging truck company near Kansas City; and then it's to Washington, DC to examine how the changing political lineup on Capitol Hill is already affecting the fortunes of the auto industry.

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New Orleans: The Big Easy

Saturday, May 29, 2010

The city of New Orleans is as proud of its traditions as it is steeped in them. But since the devastation of Hurricane Katrina, the city and its residents have been thrust into new relationships with those very traditions they hold so dear. State of the Re:Union visits the Big Easy and explore how the city is negotiating that tension between the old and the new — from race relations to po boys to combating crime — five years after the storm.

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Oakridge: A Work in Progress

Saturday, May 22, 2010

Back in the timber industry’s heyday, the small mill town of Oakridge, Oregon was thriving. Business was booming. Then in the early 1990s, the saws stopped. The mills shut down and their economies crumbled. State of the Re:Union surveys how a town that has lost its identity reinvents itself through recreation, community-building, and entrepreneurial spirit.

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Milwaukee: City of Vision

Saturday, May 15, 2010

Milwaukee, Wisconsin, once referred to as "America's Machine Shop", has suffered a similar fate to other rust-belt cities. But despite the decline of some of its industries, passionate, hard-working citizens are changing this manufacturing mecca into a city of ideas. This episode of SOTRU explores the depth and viability of some of Milwaukee's most surprising community projects, and a people of unwavering resolve.

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Greensburg: To the Stars through Difficulties

Saturday, May 08, 2010

One night in May of 2007, a tornado wiped Greensburg, Kansas, off the map. The town's residents have decided to not only resurrect the town, but to rebuild in a true spirit of renewal. State of the Re:Union examines the profound devastation and the rigors and rewards of this innovative rebirth.

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Brooklyn: Change Happens

Saturday, May 01, 2010

Brooklyn is New York's most populous borough. Ever evolving, Brooklyn has been celebrated as everything from a bastion of industry to a refuge for immigrants from around the world. This episode of SOTRU charts Brooklyn's evolution, celebrates the diverse communities and explores both sides of the dilemma that high-rise condos and gentrification has brought.

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Coming Home

Saturday, April 03, 2010

President Obama says our combat mission in Iraq will end by August 31, 2010. This leaves many unanswered questions. What was our mission in Iraq? Did we succeed? What will become of the country we invaded? Whatever the answers, our troops are coming home. But what are they coming home to? In this hour of To the Best of Our Knowledge, we'll talk with Iraq War veterans about the challenges of coming home. And, what about us? Are WE ready for THEM?

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Covering the War

Saturday, March 27, 2010

At least 120 journalists have been killed in Iraq since the war began. They're targets for insurgents. But what are journalists to the US military? A necessary evil? Or weapons of war? In this hour of To the Best of Our Knowledge, How well have journalists covered the war. We'll hear from journalists embedded in Iraq. Can journalists accurately report on the very soldier or Marine who protects them? 

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