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Specials

Air every weekend - Saturdays at 6AM on 93.9 FM and 7am and 2PM on AM 820. Sundays at 8PM on AM 820 and at other times as scheduled.

Join us for a curated presentation of special programs from public radio producers across the country. 

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Sacramento, California

Saturday, November 19, 2011

In a city where one in four households contain a government employee, the crippling state budget deficit, police layoffs, fire engine brown-outs and park closures could easily signal only the bleakest of futures. But for the oldest city on the West Coast, persistence is key. It’s a place where people are figuring out ways—from clothing swaps to home shares—to deal with the hard new economic reality.

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Too Many Kids Go To College

Sunday, November 13, 2011

Student loan debt has surpassed credit card debt, unemployment for those with bachelor’s degrees is at an all-time high, and entrepreneurs like the founders of Facebook and Microsoft prove that extraordinary success is possible without it. But recent studies show that college is economically beneficial even to those whose jobs don’t require it. The debaters are Peter Thiel, Charles Murray, Vivek Wadhwa, and Henrey Bienen. 

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Cleveland, OH

Saturday, November 12, 2011

From Rockefeller's Standard Oil to GE's first industrial park, Cleveland was a city made by entrepreneurs. But since the polluted Cuyahoga River caught fire in 1969, it's been trying to shake the moniker of "the mistake on the lake". Today Cleveland is being embraced by a new generation of entrepreneurs who are using their business sense to try and revitalize neighborhoods, clean up the environment and improve education.  

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The Hidden World of Girls

Thursday, November 10, 2011

The Hidden World of Girls gathers stories from around the world of girls and the women they became; of coming of age, rituals and rites of passage, secret identities of women who crossed a line, blazed a trail, and changed the tide.  Hosted by actress and comedian, Tina Fey, The Hidden World of Girls was inspired by the NPR series heard on Morning Edition and All Things Considered.  

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Congress Should Pass Obama's Jobs Plan - Piece by Piece

Sunday, November 06, 2011

In the face of a double-dip recession and an unprecedented long-term unemployment rate, President Obama unveiled the American Jobs Act before Congress. His plan? Lower the unemployment rate and stimulate the economy with $447 billion in employer tax breaks, jobless reintegration, state aid, and infrastructure projects, to be paid for with taxes on corporations and the wealthy. Will this plan bring a fast, effective boost to the job market, or will higher taxes punish job creators and sink us further into debt? The debaters are Cecilia Rouse, Mark Zandi, Richard Epstein, and Daniel Mitchell. 

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Southern Wyoming

Saturday, November 05, 2011

Wyoming is the least populated state in the US. In this sparsely populated landscape where private property and self sufficiency are prized, community is built on the (somewhat unwelcome) expectation that distant neighbors might need to rely on one another one day. When people come together here, they have to have good reason to. This episode will bring listeners to the towns of Laramie, Cheyenne and the surrounding landscape in Southern Wyoming, looking at how the things that happen in the small towns and countryside of rural America can change the country as a whole.

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The Bronx: Still Rising from the Ashes

Saturday, October 29, 2011

The Bronx has long been a symbol of America's failings. It's still the poorest urban congressional district in the nation, and for many who live in New York's other boroughs, the Bronx is usually a place to avoid. But despite the area's troubles, some have stayed and put down roots, intent on surviving and making their borough better. This episode looks at the hold-outs and the dreamers who've committed their lives to building community in the Bronx. 

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Gulf Coast of Mississippi

Saturday, October 22, 2011

After Hurricane Katrina ravaged the area, Mississippi Gulf Coast residents were forced to come together to deal with the aftermath. Just as they were starting to get back on their feet, the BP Deepwater Horizon disaster resulted in millions of barrels of oil being dumped into the water just off their shores. These events have made environmentalists out of a lot of Gulf Coast residents who would never have considered themselves as such. We tell an hour of stories about how the fight for the natural world is bringing Gulf Coast residents together, sometimes with unlikely partners—and how, in some instances, that fight is turning out to be exactly what a community needed to survive.

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Miami, FL

Saturday, October 15, 2011

Dubbed the “Magic City” for its stunning growth rate and rapid proliferation of high-rise skyscrapers, Miami is also the 3rd poorest city in the nation, according to the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2004 numbers. If you own a store in South Beach, your customers are equally likely to be billionaires as they are homeless. And on top of that, they’re very likely to have started life somewhere else. Miami is an incredibly international city—and so is impacted more than most cities by world events, such as the Haitian earthquake or the political situation in Cuba. In this place of class, racial and cultural juxtapositions, SOTRU has an hour of stories of Miamians reaching out from their enclaves to create community across those lines. 

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Oakland, CA

Saturday, October 08, 2011

Refugees, swindlers, visionaries, entrepreneurs chasing fast money—these are the historic roots of Oakland, California.  The city has long been home for people building new lives and imagining even better ones.  But dreams that have been deferred also haunt this place, in its empty post-boom skyscrapers, its infamous homicide rates and deep budget cuts.  In the face of entrenched problems, Oakland answers back with diverse, revolutionary solutions.  In this episode, SOTRU looks at the costs and rewards for people dreaming big in Oakland.    

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Utica, New York

Saturday, October 01, 2011

A couple of decades ago, Utica, New York, was dying; a popular bumper sticker in the ‘90s read “Last One Out of Utica, Please Turn Out the Lights.” Once a bustling textile city perched on the edge of the Erie Canal, Utica lost its mills in the mid-20th century and has been losing population ever since. But something has changed in recent years. With a surprising influx of refugees to this part of snowy, upstate New York—the newcomers have given Utica hope for second chance. SOTRU looks at the way in which Utica has opened its doors to the world’s needy, and how that’s bringing fresh energy to a city in dire need of it.

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Who Needs an English Major?

Saturday, October 01, 2011

The most popular college major in America these days is business. Some students think it doesn't pay to study philosophy or history. But advocates of liberal-arts programs advocates say their graduates are still among the most likely to become leaders, and that a healthy democracy depends on citizens with a broad and deep education. In this program, American RadioWorks' Stephen Smith examines how a form of higher learning unique to the United States is responding to the demands of the 21st century. 

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Don’t Lecture Me: Rethinking the Way College Students Learn

Saturday, September 24, 2011

In today's global economy, workers need to think well and learn fast. This documentary explores how traditional approaches to teaching are failing college students and what some in education are doing about it. 

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Birmingham, Alabama

Friday, September 23, 2011

Birmingham, Alabama.  The words tend to make you think about freedom riders, church bombings, civil rights marches and police dogs.  Almost 50 years later, people in Birmingham still can’t escape their history—especially the painful parts. Some have started trying to unearth the city’s past and face it.  In this hour, SOTRU brings listeners into the courtrooms, churches and backyards of Birmingham to answer the question borne out by the lives of people here: is Birmingham a monument to brutal segregation, or one of the few American cities willing to take a hard look at race?

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Is it Time to End the War on Terror?

Sunday, September 18, 2011

Days after 9/11, President Bush declared a War on Terror that would “not end until every terrorist group of global reach has been found, stopped, and defeated.” Since then we’ve been in two wars, witnessed the Arab Spring, and the death of Osama bin Laden. Is it time to end the War on Terror?

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Remember Us Unto Life

Sunday, September 18, 2011

"Remember Us Unto Life" is a one-hour celebration of Rosh Hashanah, The Jewish New Year, and Yom Kippur, The Day of Atonement - eight days known as the Jewish High Holidays.

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Some College, No Degree: Why So Many Americans Drop Out of College and What To Do About It

Saturday, September 17, 2011

The college drop-out rate is actually worse than the high-school drop-out rate, and about 37 million Americans are being left behind in today's demanding economy. This program examines the issue, including whether a college degree is the answer for everyone.

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Las Vegas, Nevada

Saturday, September 17, 2011

These days, competing versions of Las Vegas occupy the public imagination. One is of Sin City, the City of Lights, home to The Strip, and to glitter and entertainment. The other is as a dramatic victim of the recent economic recession, a city where entire neighborhoods have been foreclosed, where the jobless rate shot up to double digits, where massive casino and hotel construction was suspended, leaving hulking ghosts to remind residents of the boom times. SOTRU explores stories of people making Las Vegas home between these two sides of the city, those working to cultivate community in a place that has a reputation for being impersonal. 

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Dane Cook & Janeane Garofalo

Sunday, September 04, 2011

How can you sell out 20,000-seat arenas, star in several Hollywood films, record the biggest selling comedy album in 30 years, and still be called "polarizing?" Dane Cook stops by the garage to talk about being Dane Cook and whether that might be more complicated than it seems. Plus, Janeane Garafalo describes the transition from political commentary back into comedy. 

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Thomas Lennon, Dave Attell & Andy Richter

Sunday, August 28, 2011

Three conversations with guys from different parts of the comedy world. Tom Lennon talks about going from niche television acting like The State and Reno 911! to writing for big broad films like Night at the Museum; Dave Attell talks stand-up while poolside; and Andy Richter discusses the move from late-night sidekick, to sitcom star and back again. 

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