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Specials

Air every weekend - Saturdays at 6AM on 93.9 FM and 2PM on AM 820. Sundays at 7AM and 8PM on AM 820 and at other times as scheduled.

Join us for a curated presentation of special programs from public radio producers across the country. 

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Thirty Years of John

Thursday, December 15, 2011

Hear highlights from "JS:30," a Greene Space concert celebrating John Schaefer's 30 years on the air at WNYC. Guests include singer Angelique Kidjo, musician Laurie Anderson, composer Steve Reich and others. Plus: a roast in John's honor.

The World Would Be Better Off Without Religion

Sunday, December 04, 2011

In the words of Blaise Pascal, mathematician and Catholic, “Men never do evil so completely and cheerfully as when they do it from a religious conviction.” Does religion breed intolerance, violence, and the promotion of medieval ideas? Or should we concede that overall, it has been a source for good, giving followers purpose, while encouraging morality and ethical behavior?

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WNYC Holiday Special Programming

Monday, November 28, 2011

Hanukkah Lights 2011
Airs December 17 at 2PM on AM 820, December 18 at 8PM on AM 820, and December 20 at 3PM on 93.9 FM
A perennial NPR favorite, Hanukkah Lights features Hanukkah stories and memoirs written by acclaimed authors expressly for the show, as read by NPR's Susan ...

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Men Are Finished

Sunday, November 27, 2011

In a modern, post-industrial economy that seems better suited to women than men, many are wondering if men have been permanently left behind. Education and employment statistics point to a clear and growing dominance in women’s status at home and in the workplace. Are men primed for a comeback or have the old rules changed for good? The debaters are Hanna Rosin, Dan Abrams, Christina Hoff Sommers, and David Zinczenko.

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Cheryl Rogowski, Food-to-Plate Innovator

Saturday, November 26, 2011

Where does our food come from? Since we pay close attention to so many aspects of food in the holiday season, host Majora Carter visits Cheryl Rogowski, a fourth-generation farmer and the first farmer to receive a MacArthur "Genius" Fellowship. Cheryl gives us a tour of her farm, and we'll hear from people she works with in the many programs she has created - from mentoring migrant farmers to creating low-cost CSAs for senior citizens. 

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Third Coast International Audio Festival

Thursday, November 24, 2011

PRX

The Third Coast International Audio Festival brings the best new documentaries produced worldwide to the national airwaves in a special two-hour program, Best of the Best: The 2011 Third Coast Festival Broadcast. The featured documentaries, all winners of the 11th annual TC / Richard H. Driehaus Foundation Competition, demonstrate just how powerful radio can be. This is the place to hear the most accomplished producers and best emerging talent from around the world, artists who are shaping the future of public radio.

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Do Grandma’s Benefits Imperil Junior’s Future?

Sunday, November 20, 2011

Commitments made to seniors decades ago failed to foresee the harsh economic realities of the present. Do entitlements saddle our children with unmanageable debt, asking them to sacrifice their future for the sake of the elderly? Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid were created to provide a social safety net. But if we cut these programs, are we balancing the budget on the backs of the aged and sick, leaving behind society’s most vulnerable? The debaters are Margaret Hoover, Mort Zuckerman, Howard Dean, and Jeff Madrick.

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Think Like A Bee

Saturday, November 19, 2011

When you sit down at your holiday table, thank a bee. A third of the food on your plate is made possible by these pollinators, whose numbers are being decimated by disease and colony collapse disorder. But the bees have a champion in Marla Spivak, a University of Minnesota researcher and MacArthur "Genius" who thinks like a bee. Marla will show host Majora Carter (no newbie herself - Majora is an urban beekeeper) the secrets she's beginning to uncover about how bees can help us humans to be more resilient and to build healthier communities.

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Sacramento, California

Saturday, November 19, 2011

In a city where one in four households contain a government employee, the crippling state budget deficit, police layoffs, fire engine brown-outs and park closures could easily signal only the bleakest of futures. But for the oldest city on the West Coast, persistence is key. It’s a place where people are figuring out ways—from clothing swaps to home shares—to deal with the hard new economic reality.

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Too Many Kids Go To College

Sunday, November 13, 2011

Student loan debt has surpassed credit card debt, unemployment for those with bachelor’s degrees is at an all-time high, and entrepreneurs like the founders of Facebook and Microsoft prove that extraordinary success is possible without it. But recent studies show that college is economically beneficial even to those whose jobs don’t require it. The debaters are Peter Thiel, Charles Murray, Vivek Wadhwa, and Henrey Bienen. 

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Cleveland, OH

Saturday, November 12, 2011

From Rockefeller's Standard Oil to GE's first industrial park, Cleveland was a city made by entrepreneurs. But since the polluted Cuyahoga River caught fire in 1969, it's been trying to shake the moniker of "the mistake on the lake". Today Cleveland is being embraced by a new generation of entrepreneurs who are using their business sense to try and revitalize neighborhoods, clean up the environment and improve education.  

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The Hidden World of Girls

Thursday, November 10, 2011

The Hidden World of Girls gathers stories from around the world of girls and the women they became; of coming of age, rituals and rites of passage, secret identities of women who crossed a line, blazed a trail, and changed the tide.  Hosted by actress and comedian, Tina Fey, The Hidden World of Girls was inspired by the NPR series heard on Morning Edition and All Things Considered.  

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Congress Should Pass Obama's Jobs Plan - Piece by Piece

Sunday, November 06, 2011

In the face of a double-dip recession and an unprecedented long-term unemployment rate, President Obama unveiled the American Jobs Act before Congress. His plan? Lower the unemployment rate and stimulate the economy with $447 billion in employer tax breaks, jobless reintegration, state aid, and infrastructure projects, to be paid for with taxes on corporations and the wealthy. Will this plan bring a fast, effective boost to the job market, or will higher taxes punish job creators and sink us further into debt? The debaters are Cecilia Rouse, Mark Zandi, Richard Epstein, and Daniel Mitchell. 

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Southern Wyoming

Saturday, November 05, 2011

Wyoming is the least populated state in the US. In this sparsely populated landscape where private property and self sufficiency are prized, community is built on the (somewhat unwelcome) expectation that distant neighbors might need to rely on one another one day. When people come together here, they have to have good reason to. This episode will bring listeners to the towns of Laramie, Cheyenne and the surrounding landscape in Southern Wyoming, looking at how the things that happen in the small towns and countryside of rural America can change the country as a whole.

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The Bronx: Still Rising from the Ashes

Saturday, October 29, 2011

The Bronx has long been a symbol of America's failings. It's still the poorest urban congressional district in the nation, and for many who live in New York's other boroughs, the Bronx is usually a place to avoid. But despite the area's troubles, some have stayed and put down roots, intent on surviving and making their borough better. This episode looks at the hold-outs and the dreamers who've committed their lives to building community in the Bronx. 

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Gulf Coast of Mississippi

Saturday, October 22, 2011

After Hurricane Katrina ravaged the area, Mississippi Gulf Coast residents were forced to come together to deal with the aftermath. Just as they were starting to get back on their feet, the BP Deepwater Horizon disaster resulted in millions of barrels of oil being dumped into the water just off their shores. These events have made environmentalists out of a lot of Gulf Coast residents who would never have considered themselves as such. We tell an hour of stories about how the fight for the natural world is bringing Gulf Coast residents together, sometimes with unlikely partners—and how, in some instances, that fight is turning out to be exactly what a community needed to survive.

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Miami, FL

Saturday, October 15, 2011

Dubbed the “Magic City” for its stunning growth rate and rapid proliferation of high-rise skyscrapers, Miami is also the 3rd poorest city in the nation, according to the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2004 numbers. If you own a store in South Beach, your customers are equally likely to be billionaires as they are homeless. And on top of that, they’re very likely to have started life somewhere else. Miami is an incredibly international city—and so is impacted more than most cities by world events, such as the Haitian earthquake or the political situation in Cuba. In this place of class, racial and cultural juxtapositions, SOTRU has an hour of stories of Miamians reaching out from their enclaves to create community across those lines. 

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Oakland, CA

Saturday, October 08, 2011

Refugees, swindlers, visionaries, entrepreneurs chasing fast money—these are the historic roots of Oakland, California.  The city has long been home for people building new lives and imagining even better ones.  But dreams that have been deferred also haunt this place, in its empty post-boom skyscrapers, its infamous homicide rates and deep budget cuts.  In the face of entrenched problems, Oakland answers back with diverse, revolutionary solutions.  In this episode, SOTRU looks at the costs and rewards for people dreaming big in Oakland.    

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Utica, New York

Saturday, October 01, 2011

A couple of decades ago, Utica, New York, was dying; a popular bumper sticker in the ‘90s read “Last One Out of Utica, Please Turn Out the Lights.” Once a bustling textile city perched on the edge of the Erie Canal, Utica lost its mills in the mid-20th century and has been losing population ever since. But something has changed in recent years. With a surprising influx of refugees to this part of snowy, upstate New York—the newcomers have given Utica hope for second chance. SOTRU looks at the way in which Utica has opened its doors to the world’s needy, and how that’s bringing fresh energy to a city in dire need of it.

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Who Needs an English Major?

Saturday, October 01, 2011

The most popular college major in America these days is business. Some students think it doesn't pay to study philosophy or history. But advocates of liberal-arts programs advocates say their graduates are still among the most likely to become leaders, and that a healthy democracy depends on citizens with a broad and deep education. In this program, American RadioWorks' Stephen Smith examines how a form of higher learning unique to the United States is responding to the demands of the 21st century. 

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