Streams

Edit Bucket

Real-Time Reactions to Mubarak's Resignation

Mona Eltahaway, Egyptian New Yorker and columnist and public speaker on Arab and Muslim issues, reacting to the breaking news of Mubarak's resignation in Egypt.

Read more ...

Recently in It's A Free Country: Egypt

A Free Middle East? Blame George W. Bush!

Thursday, February 24, 2011

With protests sweeping the Middle East from Bahrain to Yemen to Jordan and, of course, to Libya, and with the departure of long-time dictator Hosni Mubarak from Egypt, now seems like a good time to remind everyone: Bush was right.

Read More

Comments [44]

In Libya, Government Vows to 'Fight to the Last Bullet'

Monday, February 21, 2011

The escalating violence is in a sense explained by the fact that the security organizations owe their loyalty very directly to Qaddafi. There is no way back. This is either kill or get killed. It's vice versa for the population: if you're known to act against the interests of Qaddafi, in sense you're in the same boat. For both sides this is a life or death situation. That introduces a dynamic that escalates violence very rapidly, knowing that if your side doesn't win the results will be very dire.

Dirk Vandewall, associate professor of government at Dartmouth College and author of A History of Modern Libya, on the Brian Lehrer Show.

Comment

Protecting the Freedom to Type, Text, Tweet and Talk

Friday, February 18, 2011

CBS reporter Lara Logan joined a list of dozens of reporters who were assaulted, detained or harassed while covering Egypt’s uprising last week. Protesters and outspoken government critics have also been intimidated or censored in Egypt and elsewhere. Here in New York and across the globe, human rights and advocacy groups have been working to keep the lines of communication open.

Comment

Protecting Journalists

Friday, February 18, 2011

Journalists are seen as putting themselves on an airplane and into the fray. It's a kind of "you didnt have to be there" attitude...There's a lot of condemnation for independent freelancers that a lot of networks rely on. Frequently, there isn't that sympathy as much as there is for tourists or someone who just happened to be there by accident.

Maryam Ishani, a reporter who was assaulted in Cairo during anti-government protests, on the Brian Lehrer Show.

Comments [5]

The 2011 Food Crisis

Wednesday, February 16, 2011

High food prices are not by themselves a guarantee that governments will fall, because if it were, we'd see overhauls in the governments of India or China. It's certainly the case that higher food prices combined with other things are like revolution kindling. A food price spike can spark something that can turn into this kind of democratic overhaul.

Raj Patel, visiting scholar at UC Berkeley's Center for African Studies, on The Brian Lehrer Show

Comments [19]

How Will Uprisings Change U.S. Policy in the Middle East?

Tuesday, February 15, 2011

WNYC
We had a deal with the Arab world for 30 years which was, you give us cheap oil, a stable supply of oil, and we'll stay out of your business. That deal fell apart on 9/11. First of all, oil is no longer cheap, and secondly, they weren't stable, and obviously threatened us. Reform in the Arab world has been something since 9/11 the U.S. government has been trying to push. We didn't know how to do it, George Bush thought we would invade Iraq and democracy would blossom all around the Arab world, that did not happen.

Nancy Soderberg, deputy national security advisor to the Clinton administration, former UN Ambassador and president of the Connect U.S. Fund, on The Brian Lehrer Show.

Comments [11]

Obama Timidly Comes to the Right Side of History

Tuesday, February 15, 2011

In his inaugural speech, President Obama said, "To those who cling to power through corruption and deceit and the silencing of dissent, know that you are on the wrong side of history." But his timid responses to democratic uprisings in the Middle East have shown his commitment to those on the right side of history is sorely lacking.

Read More

Comments [2]

Egypt in the Eyes of the USA

Monday, February 14, 2011

To some extent, we all know democracy works best when it comes from the country itself, out of its own traditions, its own people, its own leadership. Egypt has demonstrated that, not that a foreign country can make those kinds of things happen. We ought to be very carfeul about that.

—Ambassador Thomas Pickering,of the National Committee on American Foreign Policy, on The Brian Lehrer Show

Comments [3]

Monday Morning Reality Check: Martial Law, Not Democracy in Egypt

Monday, February 14, 2011

Champions of democracy the world over welcomed the departure of Hosni Mubarak, Friday, with a massive display of joy. Protesters across Cairo savored their victory, and correspondents on TV channels worldwide fought back tears (some, in fact did cry) as they reported the story of a revolution.

I was inspired, instead, to turn to Brother Webster -- as in Webster’s Dictionary, for a little reminder of what all the hoopla was about:

Revolution |n. (pl. s)(Origin Latin revolutio.) a fundamental change in power that takes place in a relatively short period of time.

Given this definition – “a fundamental change in power” perhaps the celebration is a bit premature. I hate to be a spoilsport, but I’m fairly confident that military regime is not what the youth of Egypt had in mind over these last three weeks. And “revolutionary change” is certainly not what has come to Egypt – not yet.

Read More

Comments [2]

Live From The Greene Space: Regime Change and its Aftermath

Friday, February 11, 2011

Hear audio above, watch the full video here, and check out the slideshow below.

On Friday, The Brian Lehrer Show and It’s A Free Country called a meeting. The agenda: understanding revolution.  At a live event in the Greene Space, people with first-hand experience of revolution from all over the world gathered with interested audience members for an in-depth conversation about what happens after an uprising. Journalists, academics and policy experts were there to inform and be informed by those with their ears to the ground — and to offer advice to Egyptians in the midst of revolution.

Comments [17]

Jubilant New York Egyptians Flood Streets of Astoria

Friday, February 11, 2011

A wave of hundreds of Egyptians flooded on to the streets of Little Egypt in Astoria, Queens, on Friday following news that President Hosni Mubarak stepped down.

Listen to Live Coverage from the BBC»

Comments [1]

Pres. Obama: 'The People of Egypt Have Spoken.'

Friday, February 11, 2011

Hours after the resignation of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, President Barack Obama remarked on the situation from the Grand Foyer of the White House.

"The people of Egypt have spoken," Obama said. "Their voices have been heard. And Egypt will never be the same."

Comments [4]

Wave of Change: Dawn of a New Egypt as Mubarak Steps Down

Friday, February 11, 2011

This is the ninth and final edition of Wave of Change, a special podcast from The Takeaway, covering the mass protests in Egypt and the consequences for the wider Arab world, hosted by John Hockenberry with Celeste Headlee.

Egypt's three-week-long anti-government revolt reached a happy denouement today when Hosni Mubarak, the country's autocratic leader of nearly thirty years, stepped down, ceding power to the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces. In today's Wave of Change, we bring you a medley of jubilant voices from Cairo, where after 18 days of protest, people power won over the forces of an oppressive regime.

Read More

Comment

Egypt — What Happens Now?

Friday, February 11, 2011

I have been watching the events in Egypt over these 18 days and it was clear that the country had risen together for a single cause — the removal of President Hosni Mubarak. But as I have suggested before, a revolution does not a democracy make.

There can be no orderly transition of government in Egypt in the midst of chaos. The protestors have made their point. They have won the day: Murbarak has resigned.

Read More

Comments [1]

Mubarak Refuses to Resign, Suleiman Tells Youth To Go Home, Crowd in Tahrir Is Upset

Thursday, February 10, 2011

President Hosni Mubarak told the Egyptian people on state TV that he will remain in Egypt until his death and will not step down until there are free elections in September. He announced that he had transfered some powers to the Vice President, and will amend the consititution in preparation for a repeal of the hated emergency law that allows the arrest of anyone who is in opposition to the government—but left it vague when that would take place.

Comments [4]

The US Response To Egypt: Supporting 'Transition'

Thursday, February 10, 2011

WNYC

Speaking to students at Northern Michigan University, President Obama called the events unfolding in Egypt a "moment of transformation." The administration has been very careful with its words about Mubarak, so Obama appears to be riding the wave, not driving the wave.

Comments [1]

Wave of Change: Tahrir Square Before Mubarak's Speech; U.S. Policy in the Middle East; Who is Omar Suleiman?

Thursday, February 10, 2011

This is the eighth edition of Wave of Change, a special podcast from The Takeaway, covering the mass protests in Egypt and the consequences for the wider Arab world, hosted by John Hockenberry with Celeste Headlee.

This episode was recorded shortly before President Hosni Mubarak announced that he was transferring some of his power to Vice President Omar Suleiman, but refused to step down. While protesters in Cairo's Tahrir Square are furious now, before Mubarak spoke, the expected him to step down and were jubilant, thinking Mubarak was about to step down. We take you there with a BBC interview with one of the protesters. Also, a discussion with Rashid Khalidi, Edward Said professor of Modern Arab Studies at Columbia University, on how U.S. policy has affected and may continue to affect democracy in the Middle East. Plus, in an excerpt from today's Takeaway, a look at Omar Suleiman with Patrick Lang, retired Army colonel, former head of Middle East intelligence at the Defense Intelligence Agency, who has known Suleiman for 20 years.

Read More

Comments [1]

Protest Context: The History of Mubarak Abuses

Thursday, February 10, 2011

Torture actually spread, it became sort of an epidemic, which is what it is today, I'm sorry to say. It happens in police stations, it happens not just with political dissidents, it happens with people just picked up for suspicion of committing ordinary crimes. This has become a serious and widespread problem.

Joe Stork deputy director of Human Rights Watch's Middle East and North Africa division, on The Brian Lehrer Show

Comments [6]

Twitter Responses To Military Announcement

Thursday, February 10, 2011

BREAKING—Egyptian military commanders told protesters in Tahrir Square that all their demands would be met today, but they were not. On twitter, the day started off with joyous pronouncements that the revolution had succeeded, followed by remarks of uncertainty, and now we're seeing anger, disappointment and promises to march to the palace in Cairo tomorrow.

Comments [1]

Wave of Change: Protesters Gain New Stamina; A Lifetime Under Mubarak; Egypt's Restless Youth

Wednesday, February 09, 2011

This is the seventh edition of Wave of Change, a special podcast from The Takeaway, covering the mass protests in Egypt and the consequences for the wider Arab world, hosted by John Hockenberry with Celeste Headlee.

In this episode, we get the latest from Cairo, where anti-government protesters have been buoyed; a "face in the crowd" interview with protester Ahmed el Gaddar, who, at 30 years old, has lived his entire life under the Mubarak regime; Tarik Yousef, senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and author of "Generation in Waiting: The Unfulfilled Promise of Young People in the Middle East," on the disconnect between Egyptian youth and their leaders; and, in an excerpt from this morning's Takeaway, former deputy prime minister of Malaysia, Anwar Ibrahim on what lessons Southeast Asia's Muslim democracies can offer Egypt.

Read More

Comment