Streams

Directed by archivist Andy Lanset, the department provides a central repository for thousands of audio recordings, photographs, memorabilia, reports, news items, program guides, institutional records, and promotional materials.

Among its holdings are more than 50,000 recordings in a variety of formats, from early lacquer and acetate discs, to reel-to-reel tapes, to digital audio tapes and compact discs.

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Recently in Archives and Preservation

Celebrating the Charter of Flushing, 1945

Friday, October 07, 2011

On October 7, 1945, New York City's Mayor La Guardia solemnly celebrated the 300th anniversary of the Charter of the Town of Flushing from the historic home of John Bowne, who played a major role in abolishing New Amsterdam Director-General Peter Stuyvesant's limitations on religious freedom in the Dutch colony of New Netherland.

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WNYC QSL CARDS

Friday, September 30, 2011

QSL postcards were used to confirm reports that a station had been heard. QSL is a "Q" code from amateur and radiotelegraph jargon that means "I confirm contact with you."

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Dedication of Frederick Douglass Circle, 1950

Saturday, September 24, 2011

Community leaders gathered this past Tuesday to dedicate a statue of 19th century social reformer and abolitionist  Frederick Douglass.

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Archives Mixtape: Water Conservation Jingle, 1949

Thursday, September 22, 2011

In 1949, the State of New York's Board of Water Supply was in the middle of constructing the Delaware Aqueduct as a means of augmenting New York City's water supply. During this time, residents and officials were deeply concerned with how all of the city's water was used -- or wasted.

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Aaron Copland at BAM, 1941

Monday, September 19, 2011

WNYC

On the occasion of the Brooklyn Academy of Music's 150th anniversary, we look back at its younger days, 70 years ago.

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Richard Hamilton

Thursday, September 15, 2011

Richard Hamilton, the "Father of Pop Art", Dies at 89

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George Kuchar

Tuesday, September 13, 2011

September 6th marked a great loss to the film community with the death of underground filmmaker George Kuchar.

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WNYC 9/11/2001

Friday, September 09, 2011

A transcript from our September, 11, 2001 airchecks.

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WNYC's New AM Transmitter, 1937

Friday, September 02, 2011

Following the landfall of Hurricane Irene this past weekend, flood waters overtook the WNYC AM transmitter site in Kearny, NJ, causing the station to stop over-the-air broadcasting. WNYC has owned several other transmitters in its history -- indeed, the AM tower used to be in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, in the location that will soon become WNYC Transmitter Park. This AM transmitter was dedicated in a ceremony on October 31, 1937.

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Berlin 1961

Friday, September 02, 2011

In this 1965 Overseas Press Club Luncheon, Hallie Burnett, novelist and publisher, describes her experience in Berlin in August, 1961. On assignment for Reader’s Digest, Burnett was charged with reporting on the conditions of the East German refugees, who were “coming over at that time at about 2,000 a night.” Amidst a quiet week, she describes the night of August 13 when the foundations for the Berlin wall were laid. She describes standing among Berliners at the Brandenburg Gate, who were so shocked they had not yet found their voices to protest.

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Arthur Ashe at the New York Public Library, 1987

Wednesday, August 31, 2011

WNYC

The largest court in the United States Tennis Association's complex in Flushing Meadows, where the US Open has taken place since 1977, is named after Arthur Ashe, one of tennis's great ambassadors. Today we give you a chance to listen to the late Ashe, in a 1987 installment of WNYC's broadcast of Voices at the New York Public Library, where he spoke about his upcoming book on racism in sports.

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Hurricanes! A Historic Look at Storms of Yore

Friday, August 26, 2011

Listen to Dr. Francis W. Reichelderfer, Chief of the United States Weather Bureau, discuss the state of the art in hurricane prevention and control in this 1961 edition of "New Horizons in Science".

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Museum of Modern Art Matisse Forum, 1951

Monday, August 22, 2011

The Museum of Modern Art's 1951 exhibition of paintings, sculptures, and drawings by French artist Henri Matisse nearly didn't happen. In this recording, broadcast over WNYC on the evening of November 15, 1951 (and with the artist's son in the audience), museum officials discussed the trouble the museum had in receiving the artworks and the importance of the materials presented.

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Leadbelly and Lomax Together at the American Music Festival

Friday, August 19, 2011

It's always exciting when we turn up an important long lost recording.  In this case, the unlabeled flip side of one of Mayor La Guardia's talks had half-a-show that's not been heard for 67 years. Hailing from February 14th, 1944, we hear two friends get together to share some music with each other and WNYC's listeners. And what better venue than the station's annual American Music Festival, eleven days of studio performances and concerts around the city dedicated to home-grown music and talent?  Talent indeed. Huddie Ledbetter, better known as Leadbelly, a renowned folksinger and bluesman, performed with pioneering folklorist Alan Lomax.

 

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Sid Zion on breaking Ellsberg, 1971

Thursday, August 18, 2011

The publication of the Pentagon Papers by the New York Times in 1971 caused more than a commotion --it precipitated the first of the "credibility gaps" between the US government and the American public. Listen to a interview with Sidney Zion, shortly after he broke the story on Daniel Ellsberg supplying the documents to the paper.

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Books and Authors Luncheon: Rachel Carson, 1951

Friday, August 12, 2011

Before achieving national acclaim for her exposé of the chemical industry, Silent Spring (1962), marine biologist and nature conservationist Rachel Carson wrote prolifically about the world of the ocean. Her sea trilogy, Under the Sea Wind (1941), The Sea Around Us (1951), and The Edge of the Sea (1955), quickly made her a New York Times bestselling author and a literary star.

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Tribute to Maria Callas, 1977

Thursday, August 11, 2011

Tyne Daly appears in the Leonard Lopate Show this week to speak about her portrayal of legendary diva Maria Callas in Terrence McNally's Tony award-winningMaster Class. Listen to this George Jellinek tribute to Callas in the WQXR show The Vocal Scene, aired just six days after the death of the great singer.

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Philip Levine reads "Mingus at the Half Note"

Wednesday, August 10, 2011

Philip Levine is set to become the nation's Poet Laureate this Fall, but he already was WNYC's Poet in Residence back in 2003. Listen to Levine read William Matthews' "Mingus at the Half Note," and how the poem relates personally to him.

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Kurt Vonnegut: WNYC Reporter on the Afterlife

Friday, August 05, 2011

The author Kurt Vonnegut (1922-2007) worked with WNYC producer Marty Goldensohn on a 1998 series known as Reports on the Afterlife. A year earlier, Vonnegut explained these reports would come as a result of "controlled near-death experiences."

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Joseph Papp and Shakespeare in the Park, 1962 & 1965

Sunday, July 31, 2011

It's summertime in New York, which means theater lovers all over the city have been scrambling to get tickets to the Public Theater's near-daily Shakespeare in the Park performances. Today we celebrate the tradition with two archival recordings from the WNYC/Municipal Archives collection featuring Joseph Papp, founder of the Public Theater (and, later, Joe's Pub).

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