Streams

Directed by archivist Andy Lanset, the department provides a central repository for thousands of audio recordings, photographs, memorabilia, reports, news items, program guides, institutional records, and promotional materials.

Among its holdings are more than 50,000 recordings in a variety of formats, from early lacquer and acetate discs, to reel-to-reel tapes, to digital audio tapes and compact discs.

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Recently in Archives and Preservation

The Evolving Motherhood of Josephine Baker

Wednesday, August 01, 2012

WNYC

"It seems strange to have so much enthusiasm at this time of day," Ms. Baker remarks at this 1964 meeting of the Overseas Press Club, where she has been invited to speak about being a mother. 

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Gore Vidal's Historical Novel 'Julian' and Its Modern Parallels

Wednesday, August 01, 2012

WNYC

"I can talk for an hour without notes, but for 15 minutes, I have to read it. I shall look up occasionally to give an air of spontaneity." Thus, Gore Vidal begins one of his customarily suave and witty speeches, this one delivered at a Books and Authors Luncheon held on November 30, 1964.

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Louis Auchincloss Asks, "What is Serious Fiction?"

Monday, July 30, 2012

WNYC

In this 1964 talk, Louis Auchincloss, author of the new book The Rector of Justin, describes the great themes facing writers and offers generous advice to those of his profession. 

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Girls Who Fly: 1965 Angel Derby Pilots Are Told Sexism Doesn't Exist

Thursday, July 26, 2012

WNYC

This Overseas Press Club conference is a reminder of the unfortunately routine institutionalized gender oppression in American industry. Featuring deft pilots in the Angel Derby, an all-female air race from New York to the Bahamas, this panel's male moderator and reporters dole out condescension and hostility, but "the girls" hold steady despite the dismissive questioning. 

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Brighter Than 100 Suns: Preparing for Nuclear Attack in New York City, 1951

Wednesday, July 25, 2012

Five years after the U.S. Army Air Force dropped atomic bombs over Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Cold War-era New York officials were preparing for the worst case scenario, an atomic bomb detonation over New York City.

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Marian Anderson Speaks on Empathy, Attainment, and Race

Monday, July 23, 2012

WNYC

As eloquent in her speech as she is in her song, the contralto Marian Anderson addresses the issues of prejudice and segregation head-on in this 1957 Books and Authors Luncheon appearance.

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Svetlana Alliluyeva's Graceful Defection from the Soviet Union

Thursday, July 19, 2012

In this recording from April 26, 1967, Svetlana Alliluyeva, the daughter of Joseph Stalin, fields a variety of questions from the New York press after leaving her homeland. "I feel like Valentina Tereshkova at her first flight into space," she confesses, referring to the first female cosmonaut.

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The Readable Steve Allen

Monday, July 16, 2012

Steve Allen's short story collection Fourteen for Tonight is the ostensible reason for his appearance at this 1956 Books and Authors Luncheon, where the "Tonight Show" host treated assembled guests more as a television audience, relying on his stand-up comedy technique and a few book-oriented jokes. Television itself, still a novelty, provided much of the material.

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Morris S. Novik: Public Radio Pioneer

Friday, July 13, 2012

Morris S. Novik was appointed by Mayor F. H. La Guardia to be the first Director of the Municipal Broadcasting System on February 9, 1938. During the nearly eight years he oversaw WNYC, he tirelessly worked to make the station an innovative and model public broadcaster. In fact, Novik laid claim to coining the phrase "public broadcasting" while at WNYC.

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Abortion in 1966: Three Men Weigh in On Women's Rights

Thursday, July 12, 2012

WNYC

In this broadcast of Maincurrents, three panelists -- all men -- examine recent legislation to "liberalize" existing abortion restrictions, leading to a wide-ranging discussion of the practice, both in the United States and abroad, as well as the historical basis for restrictions.

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Twenty-Four Years Later: Celebrating the 88th Anniversary of WNYC

Sunday, July 08, 2012

On Sunday, July 8, 2012, WNYC will mark 88 years on the air. Originally established as New York City's municipal radio station, WNYC has since become the flagship station for the country's public radio networks. In 1948, station founder Grover A. Whalen spoke briefly about what he believed to be WNYC's primary role in the lives of New York's residents.

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WNYC Turns 88: Relive the Station's First Broadcast

Sunday, July 08, 2012

WNYC's first official broadcast was at 8:56 p.m. on July 8, 1924. Since then, the station has been a witness to the news, politics and cultural events of New York City.

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Tips for the 1940s Housewife: How to Have Summer Fun With Your Kids

Thursday, July 05, 2012

Take a five-cent trip on the Staten Island ferry. Take a Fifth Avenue bus to Fort Tryon Park. Watch the planes take off and land at LaGuardia field.

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Ralph Berton: The Man Behind Radio's First Serious Jazz Music Program

Friday, June 01, 2012

From 1940 to 1942 Ralph Berton hosted WNYC's daily foray into jazz called Metropolitan Review, dedicated to "the finest in recorded hot jazz." The program was radio's first serious jazz music show on the air. 

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Doc Watson Philadelphia Folk Festival circa 1970

Wednesday, May 30, 2012

WNYC

Join the Archives department in celebrating the life of Doc Watson with this rare interview and performance at the Philadelphia Folk Festival. 

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Wolf Kahn, November 17, 1971

Friday, May 25, 2012

WNYC

Painter Wolf Kahn discusses his own work and artistic process in this 1971 installment of Views on Art with host Ruth Bowman.

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Robert Moog Interview Circa 1980

Wednesday, May 23, 2012

WNYC

The Archives Department celebrates Robert Moog's 78th birthday with this 1980s episode of WQXR's This is My Music.  Host Lloyd Moss talks with the inventor and musical pioneer and plays selections from Moog's library of compositions and influences. The program includes a virtuosic performance of Wieniawski's Violin Concerto No. 2 adapted for theremin and piano.  

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Dan Flavin, March 3, 1970

Friday, May 18, 2012

American artist Dan Flavin is well known for his often temporary, site-specific installations composed of fluorescent light tubes. In this 1970 episode of Views on Art, host Ruth Bowman interviews the artist about his work and the roles played by critics, museums and galleries.

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The Irascible Hedda Sterne, April 23, 1970

Monday, May 07, 2012

WNYC

Though a working artist for the span of some 80 years, Hedda Sterne may be best known for simply being in a photograph featuring some of the brightest stars of the Abstract Expressionist movement in America. In this interview with Views on Art host Ruth Bowman we gain some insight into the artist behind the photograph, midway through a long and successful career.

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The Reader's Almanac with Walter James Miller

Friday, May 04, 2012

Walter James Miller (1918-2010) was Professor Emeritus at New York University and host of WNYC’s Reader’s Almanac (1970-1985) and WNYC-TV’s Book World (1968-1970). He conducted early interviews with writers such as Nadine Gordimer, Erica Jong, Kurt Vonnegut, Dorothy Gallagher and Jerzy Kosinski.

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