Streams

Directed by archivist Andy Lanset, the department provides a central repository for thousands of audio recordings, photographs, memorabilia, reports, news items, program guides, institutional records, and promotional materials.

Among its holdings are more than 50,000 recordings in a variety of formats, from early lacquer and acetate discs, to reel-to-reel tapes, to digital audio tapes and compact discs.

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Recently in Archives and Preservation

Backing a Democrat for the White House: Carmine DeSapio's Partisan Politics

Wednesday, September 05, 2012

WNYC

Carmine G. DeSapio rose through the ranks of Tammany Hall, the New York City Democratic machine, starting out as an errand boy and becoming "boss" in 1949. The upcoming presidential contest is very much on DeSapio's mind during this 1955 edition of Campus Press Conference.

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'Clean Living' is a Euphemism for... What?

Tuesday, September 04, 2012

WNYC

In 1946, there was a 29% increase in the cases of venereal diseases in New York City.  Interestingly, there was a correlative rise in flushed exclamations of catching VD from toilet seats, park benches, and bus seats.

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The Democratic Machine: Carmine DeSapio and Jacob Javits Debate Ethics in Politics

Monday, September 03, 2012

WNYC

Speaking first in this 1955 debate, the Democratic boss Carmine G. DeSapio bristles at the question, "Is Tammany Hall fundamentally corrupt?" He dismisses such "sinister implications," claiming they refer to long-ago scandals.

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Sammy Davis Jr. Writes His "Emotional Soul" in Yes I Can

Friday, August 31, 2012

WNYC

Overcoming a life of hardship, Samuel Davis Jr. became a major performer in Las Vegas and a member of the legendary Rat Pack. In a quiet, moving tone, Davis, author of the just-published Yes I Can, speaks at a Books and Authors Luncheon in 1965.

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The "Overpoweringly Witty" Fiction of Noël Coward

Wednesday, August 29, 2012

WNYC

Celebrating the appearance of his first published novel, Pomp and Circumstance (1961), Noël Coward coolly rebuts those critics calling him "antiquated, snobbish, and belonging to an earlier, more complacent age." 

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Senate Subcommittee on Juvenile Delinquency: Wertham Versus Gaines On Decency Standards

Monday, August 27, 2012

WNYC

The investigation continues! The evils of horror comics are explicated by two contrasting witnesses, Dr.  Fredric Wertham, a reserved psychiatrist, and William Gaines, the chief purveyor of such lurid publications as The Haunt of Fear, The Vault of Horror, and Tales From the Crypt

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Poor Little Annie!

Saturday, August 25, 2012

WNYC

During the 1945 newspaper deliverymen's strike, Mayor Fiorello La Guardia kept the children of New York City up to date on the adventures of Dick Tracy and Little Orphan Annie by reading the Sunday comics over WNYC's airwaves.

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Eleanor Roosevelt's Hidden Talent

Friday, August 24, 2012

WNYC

To generate interest in a series of talent shows benefiting the 1957 March of Dimes, Eleanor Roosevelt tried her hand as an amateur disc jockey on WNYC.

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Senate Subcommittee on Juvenile Delinquency: Comic Books, "Soda-pop," and Societal Harm

Friday, August 24, 2012

WNYC

This is "not a subcommittee of blue-nosed censors," the chairman Robert Hendrickson claims, in his introductory remarks at these famous Congressional hearings on the link between comic books and juvenile delinquency, broadcast over WNYC on April 21, 1954.

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Radio from 'The Twilight Zone'

Thursday, August 23, 2012

WNYC

During his freshman year at Antioch College, Rod Serling worked as an unpaid intern at WNYC. Although his newsroom and script-writing duties kept him mostly off the air, Serling's unmistakable voice can be heard in the station's public service series Toward Return to Society, produced in cooperation with the New York City Department of Correction.

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We Love People Who Love Brooklyn

Wednesday, August 22, 2012

WNYC

It's a documented fact that in 1942, radio stations, newspapers and magazines maligned the borough of Brooklyn no less than 2,623 times. And that's not even counting movies. Fugheddaboudit!

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Van Cliburn's Musical Diplomacy Eases Tense U.S.-Soviet Relationship

Wednesday, August 22, 2012

WNYC

Fifty-five years ago this week, Van Cliburn was feted in New York City for his gold medal at the Tchaikovsky Competition in Russia. Our sister station WNYC covered the young Texan's triumphant return.

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Arthur C. Clarke Dabbles in Science Nonfiction and Speculates About Space Travel

Monday, August 20, 2012

WNYC

"Around the close of this century." That is when distinguished author, scientist, and visionary Arthur C. Clarke, in this 1954 appearance at a Books and Authors Luncheon, predicts man will break free of Earth and fly to the moon. 

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Random House Founder Bennett Cerf, as Skillful Storyteller and Humorist

Friday, August 17, 2012

WNYC

Alongside his meteoric rise as a publisher, Bennett Cerf pursued his natural talent for writing humor. 

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James M. Cain, Popular Novelist, Argues to Strengthen Authors' Rights, 1946

Wednesday, August 15, 2012

WNYC

Novelist and screenwriter James M. Cain promotes his idea for an American Authors Authority that would treat literature as "property." Though it never caught on at the time, Cain's plan offers insight on present-day debates about copyrights. 

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The Poet Speaks: Pastoral Tradition and the Search for Farmer Poets

Tuesday, August 14, 2012

WNYC

Harp music plays as announcer Sy Freed quotes Voltaire, “Poetry is the music of the soul and above all of great and inspired souls.” So begins this episode of The Poet Speaks from 1949, featuring poets A.M. Sullivan and Shaemas O’Sheel.

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Marya Mannes Unbuttons Minds

Monday, August 13, 2012

WNYC

In this 1965 broadcast of a Books and Authors Luncheon, critic Marya Mannes discusses American women, including the work of Helen Gurley Brown, who had recently achieved success with her book Sex and the Single Girl (1962).

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'Embracing Geography': Does New York City Incubate Poets?

Monday, August 13, 2012

WNYC

Poet, playwright, and novelist William Packard moderates this 1968 broadcast: Is there a New York poet?

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Secretary of State James Byrnes: "The Temple of Peace Must Be Built Solidly"

Monday, August 13, 2012

WNYC

In two excerpts from speeches given in 1946 and 1947 by Secretary of State James F. Byrnes, one can see the tightrope he walked in the years immediately following World War II as the Cold War loomed.

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A Paradigm Shift For the Beat Generation

Friday, August 10, 2012

WNYC

Jack Kerouac famously suggested the Beat Generation is "a swinging group…of new American men intent on joy." Scholars and writers join Kerouac in this 1959 discussion at the Brandeis University Club of New York for a rollicking, witty debate.

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