Streams

Daily Schedule

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  • 12:00 AM
    The Leonard Lopate Show
  • Melissa Clark Talks Eggplant; Bomb-Sniffing Dogs; Lost Cats; Shocking Experiments

    New York Times Dining Section columnist Melissa Clark is here with some suggestions of ways to prepare eggplant! Then we’ll talk to a trainer of bomb-sniffing dogs about how canines are taught to work in hazardous situations and why their noses are so sensitive. Nancy Davidson tells the tales behind some of the missing cat posters we see around the city. And Gina Perry on the full story behind the controversial 1961 psychological experiment in which subjects were administer electric shocks to another person when they were ordered to.

  • 02:00 AM
    BBC World Service
  • The world’s largest and oldest public broadcaster delivers on-the-ground reporting and in-depth analysis from every corner of the globe.

  • 05:00 AM
    Morning Edition
  • You know what that smooth jazz riff means: it’s your morning companion from NPR and the WNYC Newsroom, with world news, local features, and weather updates. Don’t start your day without it.

  • 09:00 AM
    BBC World Service
  • The world’s largest and oldest public broadcaster delivers on-the-ground reporting and in-depth analysis from every corner of the globe.

  • 10:00 AM
    The Brian Lehrer Show
  • Democratic Debate Recap; Illegal Dog Breeds; MLK 50 Years Later; Constitutional Dress

    David Chen of the New York Times provides analysis of last night's Democratic mayoral debate, and takes your calls on whether or not the candidates said anything that changed how you plan to vote. Plus: Historian Taylor Branch traces history of the civil rights movement over the 50 years since the March on Washington; how laws restrict the way we dress; the White House takes a stance on legislation targeting dog breeds such as the pit bull; and calls on your favorite public art.

  • 12:00 PM
    The Leonard Lopate Show
  • Events in Egypt; Algebra; Muhammad Ali Outside the Ring; the Sequester; Temple Grandin

    On today’s show: a live report on the latest events in Egypt. Nicholson Baker explains why he thinks that advanced algebra shouldn’t be a high school requirement. Director Bill Siegel talks about his documentary “The Trials of Muhammad Ali,” about the legendary boxer’s life outside the ring. New York Times reporter Ron Nixon explains how the sequester is affecting the nation as a whole. And with grain prices on the rise, Temple Grandin describes what cattle farmers are feeding their herds to keep costs low, and its dramatic effects.

  • 02:00 PM
    Fresh Air
  • The Peabody Award-winning program features Terry Gross’ fearless and insightful interviews with big names in pop culture, politics and the arts.

  • 03:00 PM
    The Takeaway
  • New Documents Show Sweeping NSA Surveillance of Americans | Why Bacteria Can Be Good for Us | Revitalizing & Reinventing Immersion Theater

    New Documents Show Sweeping NSA Surveillance of Americans | The End of an Era: Final Set of Nixon Tapes Released | Mapping Our Digital DNA | North Carolina Overhauls Election Process | Symbiotic Relationships & The Circle of Life | Why Bacteria Can Be Good for Us | Revitalizing & Reinventing ...

  • 04:00 PM
    All Things Considered
  • A wrap-up of the day’s news, with features and interviews about the latest developments in New York City and around the world, from NPR and the WNYC newsroom.

  • 06:30 PM
    Marketplace
  • Marketplace is not only about money and business, but about people, local economies and the world — and what it all means to us.

  • 07:00 PM
    All Things Considered
  • A wrap-up of the day’s news, with features and interviews about the latest developments in New York City and around the world, from NPR and the WNYC newsroom.

  • 08:00 PM
    Freakonomics Radio
  • Freakonomics Radio: The Cobra Effect

    If you want to get rid of a nasty invasive pest, it might seem sensible to offer a bounty. But as we’ll hear in this episode of Freakonomics Radio, bounties can backfire. We look at bounties on snakes in Delhi, rats in Hanoi, and feral pigs in Fort Benning, Georgia. ...

  • 09:00 PM
    Soundcheck
  • Punk, Then And Now: Savages, Death, And A Magazine That Burned Out Before It Faded Away

    Soundcheck is revisiting some of our favorite segments from the past year. Today, we're presenting "Punk, Then And Now," featuring a live set from a highly celebrated new post-punk band, a documentary about a rediscovered classic punk group, and a new book looking back at punk's first magazine.

    In this episode: In 2012, British post-punk band Savages was hailed as one of the best new bands in the U.K. with just a handful of songs to its credit. Now the group's brutal and elegant debut, Silence Yourself, is earning rave reviews. We hear an in-studio performance.

    Plus: A new documentary sheds light on Death, a Detroit-based proto-punk group founded in 1971 by three African-American brothers. We talk with member Bobby Hackney Sr. and the film’s director, Jeff Howlett.

    And: Punk magazine folded in 1979 after publishing just 17 issues, but it also chronicled the critical early years of the punk movement. We hear the story from Punk co-founder John Holmstrom.

    • 10:00 PM
      Q with Jian Ghomeshi
    • A hip, energetic daily arts and culture program hosted by writer and musician Jian Ghomeshi, one of Canada’s foremost tastemakers.

    • 11:00 PM
      New Sounds
    • Poetry Set to Music, II

      This New Sounds is the companion program to last night's show, where we'll not be limited to English-language poets.  Look forward to texts by Rumi (Persian poet and mystic), set by Philip Glass.  Also, listen for poetry by Pablo Neruda in a setting by Osvaldo Golijov.  Plus, music by 17th century Alevi-Bektashi poets, as rendered by the band Niyaz and their vocalist Azam Ali, and more music with poetry by Pablo Neruda, and perhaps text by Rainer Maria Rilke, and more.