Streams

Todd Zwillich

Washington Correspondent, The Takeaway

Todd Zwillich appears in the following:

Keeping Earth cool with cool colors, man

Friday, May 01, 2009

Everybody is trying to do their part to reduce the effects of climate change. But most of us are also probably hoping for some major shifts in our energy infrastructure to make the biggest differences. But a group of scientists in California would like to see the Department of Energy back a relatively simple idea: lightening up the colors of our rooftops and roads to reduce the energy that our homes and land absorb.

On The Takeaway is Surabi Menon, a research scientist at the Lawrence Berkley National Laboratory in Berkley, California, to explain how this would work.

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The role Justice Souter played in court

Friday, May 01, 2009

Justice David Souter is planning to retire after more than 19 years on the Supreme Court, giving President Obama his first chance to fill a vacancy. What was Souter known for, and what will his retirement mean for the Supreme Court? To answer these questions on The Takeaway is Nate Persily, a professor of law and political science at Columbia University. He was at the Supreme Court this week watching the events unfurl.
"I think it's likely that he's going to get three pics. I think Justice Ginsberg and Justice Stevens are likely to retire in the next three years. At least those two."
—Columbia law and political science professor Nate Persily on Obama's Supreme Court picks.

Click through for a transcript.

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Schools close due to swine flu outbreak

Friday, May 01, 2009

Hundreds of schools nationwide received unexpected vacation days this week for thousands of school kids because of concerns about swine flu. In Fort Worth, Texas, all 144 schools were closed because of a suspected swine flu case.

Joining The Takeaway is Monica Davey, the Chicago bureau chief for The New York Times, and Clint Bond, spokesperson for The Fort Worth Independent School District to talk about the various reactions nationwide towards how to deal with swine flu concerns that are affecting our daily lives.

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Giddy Up! The Kentucky Derby is not just fancy hats and mint juleps

Friday, May 01, 2009

This Saturday marks the 135th running of The Kentucky Derby. If you don't know anything about the Kentucky Derby, except that women wear big hats and spectators drink mint juleps then you're missing out, because there's so much more to the Derby than that. Like how people choose which horse to bet on, how much a jockey can weigh and why mint juleps are a waste of good bourbon.

Jennie Rees, is a reporter for the Courier Journal, she's covered horse racing for over 25 years and she joins The Takeaway from the back side of Church Hill Downs.

Watch favored horse "I Want Revenge" train for the Derby in the video below.

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Chrysler takes the Studebaker road

Friday, May 01, 2009

Chrysler filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy yesterday. It was the first major automaker since Studebaker in 1933 to attempt to restructure under bankruptcy. Three years later, Studebaker emerged from bankruptcy and managed to stay alive for a few more decades until 1966. Joining The Takeaway is Rebecca Lindland from Global Insight, a financial forecasting company; and Robert Farago, a blogger for The Truth About Cars.
"When you go under the knife and under anesthesia, there's always complications. The longer the surgery lasts, the less likely the patients going to survive.And the same thing can be said about this bankruptcy idea."
—Rebecca Lindland, director of Automotive Research for the Americas, on Chrysler's bankruptcy

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The WHO renames 'swine flu'

Friday, May 01, 2009

The World Health Organization announced yesterday that they no longer will be referring to swine flu as the "swine flu" after receiving constant pressure from the meat industry. Its new name, "influenza A (H1N1)" doesn't necessarily roll off the tongue. Grant Barrett, a lexicographer and the co-host of the public radio show "A Way with Words," joins The Takeaway.

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Supreme Court Justice Souter to retire, leaving open seat for Obama to fill

Friday, May 01, 2009

Justice David Souter has reportedly told the White House that he will retire from the Supreme Court at the end of the court's term in June. Justice Souter's retirement would give President Obama his first pick for the high court. Adam Liptak, the Supreme Court correspondent for the New York Times, joins The Takeaway to discuss what role Souter played in the high court and who are likely replacements for him.

For more on the Justice Souter story, watch this clip from The Rachel Maddow Show.

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Virus hunter Nathan Wolfe says we could have detected swine flu earlier

Thursday, April 30, 2009

Global health officials are warning that H1N1 swine flu could bloom into a pandemic. Yesterday, the World Health Organization declared a Phase Five alert. Epidemiologist and virus hunter Nathan Wolfe, of the Global Viral Forecasting Initiative, says it never should have gotten to this point. In an op-ed in today's New York Times, Wolfe argues that if global public health functioned differently, we probably could have detected the virus before it spread so widely.

Still unsure of how to spot swine flu? This video from the Centers for Disease Control explains the symptoms.

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A report on the third stage of India's election from the BBC's Elections Train

Thursday, April 30, 2009

Stage three of India's five-stage, month-long election takes place Thursday. BBC India correspondent Tinku Ray reports from Mumbai on BBC's "Elections Train," which has been traveling across the world's largest democratic nation.

And, you can follow the train's journey on an interactive map on the BBC's Web site, http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/south_asia/8000645.stm and follow the BBC's Indian election coverage at http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/indiaelection09/.

For footage from India's election watch the video below.

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Credit Suisse pays out bonuses in "toxic assets"

Thursday, April 30, 2009

The AIG bonus scandal stirred intense anger from the public, the media and the president. Swiss bank Credit Suisse has adopted a creative solution to the bonus paying problem — pay part of employees bonuses in "toxic assets," those repackaged bad loans that are at the center of our economic downturn. Jesse Eisinger, a financial writer who has worked at the Wall Street Journal and Condé Nast Portfolio, explains.

Click through for a transcript.

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Three strikes and you're out, French downloaders!

Thursday, April 30, 2009

The French government is on the verge of passing a law that would punish Web users for downloading illegal content. Pushed by French President Nicolas Sarkozy, the bill proposes that after your third violation you will be banned from the Internet for a year. Some argue that this would violate our fundamental human rights. That's right, the Internet as a fundamental human right. Siva Vaidhyanathan, an associate professor of Media Studies and Law at the University of Virginia, joins The Takeaway.

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Analysis of President Obama's prime-time 100-days press conference

Thursday, April 30, 2009

President Barack Obama marked his first 100 days in office last night with a prime-time news conference. It was the third of Obama's presidency, and the first not dominated by the recession. Jay Newton-Small, Washington reporter for Time Magazine, joins The Takeaway to analyze the press conference.

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What is a "Phase Five" swine flu threat?

Thursday, April 30, 2009

The World Health Organization has raised its pandemic threat level to Phase Five. What does that mean? The BBC's Matt McGrath explains the connection between the threat level and international caution.
"They’re hoping if they can get this shut down until the 5th of May or so they will be able to stop any further spread of the disease in their country and be able to effectively, if not shut it out, at least weaken its sufficiently to be able to curtail the deaths."
—BBC reporter Matt McGrath on the spread of swine flu in Mexico

Click through for a transcript.

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Despite a tough economy, some industries are still hiring

Thursday, April 30, 2009

Jobless numbers are the highest levels in decades and there's been little good news for people who find themselves without work. But, believe it or not, there is still such a thing as a growth industry. It's just a matter of knowing which doors you need to get a foot into. The Takeaway talks to Marci Alboher, writer of the Working the New Economy blog on Yahoo!'s Shine. Share your tips for finding work in a down economy.

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A year after visiting the food pantry, a grandmother leaves her foreclosed home

Thursday, April 30, 2009

When we spoke with Janie Larson a year ago, the soaring cost of oil, the rising cost of food and the months of unemployment that she had just emerged from had her going to a food bank for the first time. One year later, we check in with Janie to see how she's been weathering this economic climate.

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How prepared are the states for a swine flu pandemic?

Thursday, April 30, 2009

The swine flu remains an "outbreak" not a "pandemic," but global health officials are warning that it could turn into one. The virus is now in at least 10 countries and World Health Organization has raised its pandemic threat level to Phase 5. How prepared are the states after shedding thousands of workers in their health departments? The Takeaway is joined by Dr. Paul Jarris, executive director of the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials.
"The public health community at the state, local and federal level has been preparing for years for a pandemic. We are well-prepared. We have plans, they've been exercised, they've been drilled and right now they're being put in place across the country."
—Dr. Paul E. Jarris on the nation's preparedness for a flu pandemic

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The New Orleans JazzFest is also a festival of food

Thursday, April 30, 2009

In New Orleans, the city's famed Jazz & Heritage Festival is underway. And of course, most people go for the music. But there's another side to JazzFest: the food. The Takeaway is joined by Kathy Gunst, a food writer and radio producer who did some digging into Louisiana's favorite dishes, from gumbo to jambalaya to ya ka mein.

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A review of President Obama's prime-time 100-days press conference

Thursday, April 30, 2009

President Barack Obama marked his first 100 days in office last night with a prime-time news conference. It was the third of Obama's presidency, and the first not dominated by the recession. April Ryan, White House Correspondent for American Urban Radio Networks, and Julie Mason, White House Correspondent for The Washington Examiner, join The Takeaway to review the press conference.

In case you missed it, watch Obama's comments about waterboarding in the video below.

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Update on Arlen Specter's press conference

Wednesday, April 29, 2009

Senator Arlen Specter shocked the political scene yesterday when he announced that after 29 years as a Republican, he was switching teams. His move puts the Democrats in position to have an almost filibuster-proof majority in the Senate. Today Arlen Specter was greeted with open arms by President Obama and Vice President Joe Biden. The Takeaway's Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich joins us with an update from the press conference.

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Arlen Specter's switcheroo

Wednesday, April 29, 2009

Shell-shocked Republicans are still reeling after losing one of their own to the Democratic party. After years of being wooed, Sen. Arlen Specter decided it was time to cross the aisle. Senator Specter will be appearing at a press conference with President Obama and Vice President Biden in less than two hours. For more The Takeaway talks with our Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich, and Laura Vecsey, Political Reporter for The Patriot-News in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.

Watch Senator Specter discuss his party switch in the video below.

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