Tim Padgett

Tim Padgett appears in the following:

For Many Central American Migrants, U.S. Border Is Now Beyond Reach

Wednesday, October 07, 2015

It seems the entire world is wrestling with immigration emergencies today. And lest you think the Western Hemisphere's crisis is over, consider the look on Oscar Ortega's face.

He just got a WhatsApp message that made his eyes pop.

Ortega directs the federal El Edén center in San Pedro Sula, ...


A Custody Battle That Shaped Diplomacy

Friday, July 24, 2015

With embassies re-opening in Washington DC and Havana this week, we consider how coverage of the Elián González custody battle 15 years ago influenced US-Cuba relations today.

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How The Battle Over Elián González Helped Change U.S. Cuba Policy

Sunday, June 28, 2015

Sunday marks the 15th anniversary of the end of the Elián González drama — the international custody battle that gave the cable news networks bizarre fodder for seven long months in 1999 and 2000.

Elián was a 5-year-old boy found drifting off the Florida coast after his mother drowned during ...


In Search Of Bandwidth, Cuban Entrepreneurs Head To Miami

Tuesday, May 26, 2015

When Cuban bikini maker Victor Rodríguez visited Miami this month, he was on a pilgrimage — not just for bathing suits but for bandwidth.

The most important stop on Rodríguez's schedule was lunch in Wynwood, Miami's high-tech district, with Mel Valenzuela, who owns the online swimwear store Pretty Beachy.

As ...


A Warning For Latin America's Faltering Economies: 'Innovate Or Die'

Wednesday, November 26, 2014

One look at the Brazilian flag and you think: This must be a space-age, high-tech country. That star-spackled orb in the middle glowing like a planetarium. The banner wrapped around it hailing "Order and Progress." Engineers must be rock stars there, right?

Unfortunately, no. And that's a big reason Brazil ...


Cuban Rafters Still Attempt Difficult Journey To The U.S.

Tuesday, September 02, 2014

This month is the 20th anniversary of the Cuban refugee exodus when 35,000 Cubans fled on rafts to the U.S. There's been a spike this year in Cubans risking their lives on rafts to reach the U.S.


Owed Billions By Venezuela, Airlines Cut Back On Flights There

Thursday, July 10, 2014

American Airlines is one of the latest carriers to cut back on service. Due its dwindling dollar reserves, Venezuela is balking at paying airlines the hard currency they're owed for ticket sales.


Panama's Canal Divides A Country Into Haves And Have-Nots

Sunday, June 01, 2014

Jorge Quijano has one of the coolest office views in the Americas: the Pacific port entrance to the Panama Canal. The panoramic vista seems to help Quijano, who heads the Panama Canal Authority, see the bigger picture.

On the one hand, Quijano understands why Panama has run the canal so ...


WFUV Presents: Sharon Van Etten

Sunday, June 01, 2014

Building on the success of her third album, Tramp, Sharon Van Etten decided that the next direction to take was her own. So Are We There is her first self-produced album, recorded with her stellar band and some assistance from veteran producer Stewart Lerman.

Van Etten recently brought that ...


Expanding The Panama Canal: The Problem Is Money, Not Mosquitoes

Saturday, May 31, 2014

When the United States built the Panama Canal a century ago, it faced harrowing obstacles, from mudslides to malaria that killed thousands. But history doesn't appear to show a financial dispute with contractors. At least not one that halted labor on the maritime marvel.

Fast forward a century, to a ...


Rum Renaissance Revives The Spirit's Rough Reputation

Friday, April 25, 2014

The official cheap liquor of spring breakers is becoming something much more sophisticated. And South Florida has become ground zero for the rum revolution.


NPR Bestsellers: Paperback Nonfiction, Week Of April 24, 2014

Friday, April 25, 2014

Heaven Is For Real, about a 4-year-old who sees a vision of heaven during surgery, appears at No. 2.


El Salvador's New President Faces Gangs, Poverty And Instability

Wednesday, March 19, 2014

Here's something you probably didn't know: Salvadorans are poised to pass Cubans as the third-largest Latino group in the United States, behind Mexicans and Puerto Ricans.

There are 2 million Salvadorans in the U.S. That's almost a third of the entire population of El Salvador itself, Central America's smallest country. ...


As The Economy Struggles, Venezuelans Hit The Streets

Sunday, February 23, 2014

Leopoldo López is a rock star to Venezuelans living in the United States. But in west Caracas he's the rich guy. And those contrasting images could affect the outcome of street protests playing out in Venezuela right now.

But first the obvious: This week's arrest of López, a top Venezuela ...


Brazil's Slaves Are Being Freed, But Owners Go Largely Unpunished

Wednesday, January 29, 2014

I bought Francisco Lima his first taste of freedom in decades.

A cheeseburger.

It was 2004, and Brazil was starting to confront one of its most distressing problems: slavery. I was in northern Pará state, in the Amazon, observing a special police unit that raided slaveholding farms and ...


Considering the Caribbean: Possible Effects of Rising Sea Levels in Our Backyard

Wednesday, November 13, 2013

Last week's tsunami-like surge in the Philippines might be far away, but there's another vulnerable coast line right in our backyard: The Caribbean. Rising sea levels could have consi...

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A Win for Sweet Micky

Wednesday, April 06, 2011

Earlier this week, Michel “Sweet Micky” Martelly -- a flamboyant Kompa musician-turned-politician -- was announced as the presumed winner of Haiti's presidential election. The political newcomer earned an overwhelming 67% of the vote. But he also inherits the reigns to a nation in turmoil, still very much in recovery from 2010's devastating earthquake. Tim Padgett, TIME's Miami & Latin America bureau chief, joins us to reflect on Martelly’s win.