Streams

T.J. Raphael

Digital Content Editor of The Takeaway

T.J. Raphael appears in the following:

The Magic of a Snow Day, Now and Then

Wednesday, January 22, 2014

Though heavy snowfalls can conjure feelings of frustration for commuters, a bed of freshly packed snow can also bring back memories of days passed when thick snow meant a day at home from school. Todd Zwillich, Takeaway Washington Correspondent, gives us some of his best snow day memories. Lester Laminack is the author of the children's book "Snow Day!" When he's not writing books he's a professor of education at Western Carolina University. He joins The Takeaway to explain how snow days bring back childhood memories.

Comments [9]

A New Chapter for the Voting Rights Act?

Wednesday, January 22, 2014

A bipartisan group of lawmakers have introduced a new bill that takes up some of the issues identified in the Supreme Court’s June decision in Shelby Counter v. Holder. Joining The Takeaway to explain the aspects of the new bill are Erin O’Brien, Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Massachusetts Boston, and Todd Zwillich, The Takeaway's Washington Correspondent, who has been following the politics behind the proposed update to the Voting Rights Act. 

Comment

Drama Continues for Christie Camp

Tuesday, January 21, 2014

It looks like things may continue to worsen for New Jersey Governor Chris Christie before they improve. Hoboken Mayor Dawn Zimmer has revealed that the Christie administration held Hurricane Sandy recovery money hostage, tying the aid to her support for a real estate development project. Joining The Takeaway for an update on Bridgegate is New Jersey Public Radio reporter Matt Katz.

Comments [3]

Our Sleepy Sun?

Tuesday, January 21, 2014

While most meteorologists focus on weather patterns, we also know that the Sun's behavior plays a role in regulating winter temperatures. The word "sleepy" is being used about the Sun right now—the likes of which has not been seen for about 100 years. David Hathaway is Solar Astronomer at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center. He explains the latest solar cycle and what impacts it could have on climate change.

Comments [1]

Transcript: Bill & Melinda Gates on The Takeaway

Tuesday, January 21, 2014

TRANSCRIPT: In their annual letter and in this interview with Takeaway Host John Hockenberry, Bill and Melinda Gates examine three particular myths: That poor countries are doomed to stay poor, that foreign aid is wasteful, and that saving lives leads to overpopulation. Here you will find a full transcript of their interview, along with the audio clip.

Comments [1]

Money Addiction: How Much Is Enough?

Tuesday, January 21, 2014

Wealth can be a tool for investment, for development and even for change. But wealth can also be an end in itself—becoming an addiction. That was the case for Sam Polk, a former hedge fund manager. In his last year on Wall Street, Polk earned a $3.6 million bonus. He felt it wasn't enough. Today, Polk explores why Americans love and possibly have an addiction to money.

Comments [15]

Bill and Melinda Gates on the Myths of Poverty

Tuesday, January 21, 2014

Since launching their foundation in 2000, Bill and Melinda Gates have granted nearly $30 billion to organizations and individuals working to eradicate poverty. In an interview on Tuesday with Takeaway host John Hockenberry, the couple talk about why poor countries aren't doomed to stay poor.

Comments [14]

Looking Back at Motown's Civil Rights Recordings

Monday, January 20, 2014

Motown has become an American institution. But Motown also had a spoken-word label called Black Forum, which was set up in 1970. Two years after he was assassinated, the label released a speech by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Television and radio broadcaster, Alvin Hall recently completed a half hour story on the Black Forum label for the BBC. He shares what he learned and describes why Motown got involved in civil rights recordings.

Comments [4]

Today's Highlights | January 20, 2014

Monday, January 20, 2014

Also On Today's Show: The Seattle Seahawks denied the San Francisco 49ers a return trip to the Super Bowl. William Rhoden, sports columnist for our partner The New York Times, provides a look at what’s in store for the Seahawks and the Denver Broncos as they head to the Super Bowl. In a divided Congress and an election year, lawmakers are practically sprinting for the exits, with several announcing their plans to retire. Takeaway Washington correspondent Todd Zwillich explains what the departures could mean for 2014.

Comment

Communities Fight Mississippi's Diabetes Crisis

Monday, January 20, 2014

Diabetes is quickly on the raise in Mississippi, with potentially a third of the population suffering with the disease by 2030. For the underfunded and under-resourced, the state of Mississippi is now looking toward community leaders to make health changes for residents at the local level. Dr. Michael Minor, the reverend at the Oak Hill Missionary Baptist Church in Hernado, MS, explains how his congregation is fighting obesity and diabetes.

Comment

A Defense of Russia's Vladimir Putin

Monday, January 20, 2014

With less than three weeks until the opening ceremonies at the 2014 Winter Olympic Games in Sochi, Russian President Vladimir Putin has been put in the international spotlight. Dmitry Babich is a political analyst for Voice of Russia, the country's state-run radio network. He defends President Putin's actions in the months before the Olympic Games. "Putin just wants the world to see that Russia is a normal country," he tells The Takeaway's John Hockenberry.

Comments [8]

Shunning Retirement for Start Ups

Monday, January 20, 2014

Older Americans are increasingly shunning retirement to start companies. Liz DiMarco Weinmann is 61-years-old and started Dare Force Corporation, which helps women over 40 to start new careers. Susan Price is 54-years-old and was laid off in 2008. Losing her job prompted her to go back to school for an MBA. She now works full-time and has also started her own side-business as a career coach. Together these two women explain how they made their career transitions and what the process was really like.

Comments [1]

Obama Overhauls NSA's Surveillance Programs

Friday, January 17, 2014

President Barack Obama has announced a major overhaul of the National Security Agency's (NSA) surveillance practices. The president said that in order for the nation's intelligence community to be effective over the long haul, the trust of the American people must be maintained. To maintain that trust, the president said he would end the vast collection of phone data “as it exists” today. The Takeaway's Washington Correspondent, Todd Zwillich breaks it down with further NSA analysis from Pulitzer Prize winning author Lawrence Wright.

Comments [3]

The Evolution of Hollywood Movie Villains

Friday, January 17, 2014

Movie villains are everywhere in the films hitting the box office this week—from Victor Cherevin in the new film “Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit,” to the mysterious secret kingpin in "Ride Along," which stars Ice Cube and Kevin Hart. But where do these villains come from? Helping us to understand how our villains have evolved is James Furbush, he’s co-author of the essay “Hollywood’s Evil Men: A Symbol of America’s Collective Fears.” As usual, the Movie Date team—Rafer Guzman and Kristen Meinzer—give their reviews of the new releases.

Comments [1]

Water in America: In the Tap We Trust?

Friday, January 17, 2014

How did America’s water system get the way it is today? Martin Melosi, author of The Sanitary City and professor of history at the University of Houston, explains. Jennifer Weidhaas, assistant professor of Environmental Engineering at West Virginia University; Mark Davis, director of the Institute on Water Resources Law and Policy at Tulane University Law School; and David Soll, Assistant Professor in the Watershed Institute for Collaborative Environmental Studies at the University of Wisconsin–Eau Claire, provide a snapshot of what the water is like in three different regions of the U.S.

Comments [10]

Developing Innovative Ways to Fund Science

Friday, January 17, 2014

On the surface, crowdfunding science research provides an opportunity to close the divide between the scientists and the general public. But how effective are these efforts? Heather Goldstone, science editor with our partner WGBH, has been reporting on new crowdsourcing in scientific funding. Ralph Keeling, director of the Scripps CO2 and O2 programs at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, is also tapping the power of crowdfunding. He joins The Takeaway to explain his efforts to help fund his work.

Comment

West Virginians Report Illness From Water

Thursday, January 16, 2014

Since Monday, the ban on tap water following the Elk River chemical spill in West Virginia has been lifted incrementally. Though the taps have started running and the cameras have begun to head home, the story is not over. Since officials began clearing the water for use, dozens of residents have reported symptoms chemical exposure. Joining The Takeaway is Dr. Elizabeth Brown, a Charleston-based general practitioner who has been treating victims of the chemical spill.

Comments [6]

A Cryptologist's Critique of NSA Reforms

Thursday, January 16, 2014

Cryptologists have their own opinions about how best to protect the American public. And because they design many of the privacy programs that the National Security Agency has thwarted, they have a unique perspective on how best to reform the agency. Joseph Bonneau, a cryptologist and winner of the NSA's Best Scientific Cybersecurity Paper award for his work on passwords and encryption, discusses his profession's long history of conflict with the NSA.

Comments [2]

Air Force Nuke Officers Caught In Cheating Scandal

Thursday, January 16, 2014

Once a month, the military makes the people who are responsible for operating this nation's nuclear missile arsenal take a test, and they must score perfectly to keep their jobs. Now the Air Force has disclosed that 34 officers at Malstrom Air Force Base in Montana have been suspended for cheating on their proficiency test or not reporting cheating by others. Retired Air Force Colonel Randall Larsen joins The Takeaway to explain the details behind the controversy.

Comments [1]

Could the Supreme Court Upend the TV Business?

Thursday, January 16, 2014

Aereo bypasses cable boxes to deliver broadcast channels that hold the rights to air events like the Oscars or the Super Bowl. Now the Supreme Court must decide whether Aereo's service is an innovation—or whether it's simply using the internet to steal creative content. Aereo founder and CEO Chet Kanojia says that while his technological innovation has been a good business so far, this case is about freedom.

Comments [5]