Streams

T.J. Raphael

Digital Content Editor of The Takeaway

T.J. Raphael appears in the following:

Senate to Vote to Extend Unemployment Benefits

Monday, January 06, 2014

The Senate is back in session today and the House returns tomorrow. Though it’s a new year, much of what’s on the agenda is last year’s business. At the top of the list is a vote to extend unemployment insurance for the 1.3 million jobless workers who lost those benefits just after Christmas. Todd Zwillich, Takeaway Washington Correspondent, provides a look ahead. 

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Drones: The Defining Airspace Technology of 2014

Monday, January 06, 2014

Over the next five years, the Pentagon is looking to increase the use of robotic weapons—is this a good thing for national security, and can the U.S. even count on its global drone edge for that long? Clint Watts, a Senior Fellow at the Homeland Security Policy Institute and at the Foreign Policy Research Institute, makes the case for why drones don’t deserve the bad reputation they get.

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The Top Risks Facing the U.S. & the World in 2014

Monday, January 06, 2014

While the world saw a host of dramatic changes in 2013—an elected government replaced by the military in Egypt, a new pope in Rome, a resurgent Bashar al-Assad in Syria—2014 will likely see greater shifts in politics and the international economy. Ian Bremmer, president and founder of the Eurasia Group, a global political risk research and consulting firm, examines the top risks facing the U.S and the world in 2014.

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The Costs of Climate Change

Monday, January 06, 2014

Taxes sounded worse than environmental catastrophe in the politics of 2010, but ironically one of the more persuasive arguments that climate change is real—persuasive especially to anti-tax conservatives—is how changing, unpredictable and severe weather is increasingly exacting a tax on all aspects of life in America. Gary Yohe, professor of Economics and Environmental Studies at Wesleyan University, explores the hidden costs of climate change.

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Award Season Premiere: Films You May Have Missed

Friday, January 03, 2014

If Friday's winter storm has got you stuck indoors this weekend, the timing couldn’t be better because it’s officially the start of awards season, with the Golden Globes just 9 days away. Joining The Takeaway to fill you in on all the must-see films that you may have missed before awards season are Rafer Guzman, film critic for Newsday and Kristen Meinzer, culture producer for The Takeaway.

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Blizzard is de Blasio's First Big Test - How'd he Do?

Friday, January 03, 2014

A winter storm settled in across the northeast and parts of the Midwest last night, affecting an estimated 100 million people nation wide. This nor'easter is also providing a test for some incoming and outgoing mayors. Joining The Takeaway to give an update on the storm from across the country are Andrea Bernstein, metro editor for WNYC; Phillip Martin, senior investigative reporter for our partner WGBH; and Quinn Klinefelter, senior news editor for WDET.

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'Tomorrow-Land': Examining The Cultural Impact of The 1964-65 World's Fair

Friday, January 03, 2014

Fifty years ago, New York City was a very different place when it hosted visitors from around the world for the World's Fair of 1964-65. Joseph Tirella, author of “Tomorrow-Land: The 1964-65 World’s Fair and the Transformation of America,” examines how the 1964-65 World's Fair represented a changing United States, a country transfixed by technoogy and rapid transition.

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Extremists Capture Parts of Key Iraqi Cities

Friday, January 03, 2014

Sunni militants in Iraq have captured parts of two key cities in Anbar Province, one of the bloodiest battlegrounds in the Iraq War. Nearly a third of all the Americans killed in Iraq died fighting in Anbar. Tim Arango, Baghdad Bureau Chief for Takeaway partner The New York Times, discusses the conflict, and whether this week's bloodshed might escalate sectarian violence throughout the country.

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Olympian Jazmine Fenlator: From Track Start to Bobsled Pilot

Friday, January 03, 2014

Jazmine Fenlator is like a lot of Olympic athletes. She played sports growing up, excelled in high school athletics, and was recruited by a university to compete on their Division 1 Track and Field team. She holds the university’s records for the indoor shot put, outdoor shot put, and discus. But while it sounds like Jazmine is the track star we’ll all be cheering for in the near future, she is, in fact, the pilot the U.S. Olympic Women’s bobsled team.

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The Divided Households of Downton Abbey

Friday, January 03, 2014

The highly anticipated fourth season of Downton Abbey premiers Sunday night, and Lucy Lethbridge, author of Servants: A Downstairs View of Britain from the Nineteenth Century to Modern Times, argues that the servant/nobility relationship shaped nearly everything in British life.

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Relearning Language Through Photography

Thursday, January 02, 2014

More than five years ago, photographer Rachael Jablo developed chronic migraines. As a side effect of the medication she took to help treat those migraines, Jablo developed aphasia which caused her to lose her ability to remember language. Slowly, she was able to speak but could no longer remember certain words to identify simple objects or feelings. Eventually, she came up with the idea of using photography as a way to relearn language.

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Colorado Retail Marijuana Sales Begin

Thursday, January 02, 2014

In the fall of 2012, Colorado voters approved the use, possession, and sale of small amounts of marijuana for adults above the age of 21. Yesterday that new measure fully took effect with dozens of marijuana retailers opening their doors to recreational customers for the first time. Dennis Huspeni, staff writer at the Denver Business Journal, joins The Takeaway to explain what the first day of business was like.

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Supreme Court Halts Contraception Mandate for Religious Groups

Thursday, January 02, 2014

On Tuesday, Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor temporarily blocked the Obama administration from forcing some religious-affiliated groups to provide health insurance coverage of birth control or face penalties as part of the Affordable Care Act. Joining The Takeaway to explain what this means for the law is Jeffrey Rosen, president and CEO of the National Constitution Center.

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Uighurs Release From Gitmo Signals Possibility for Prison's Closure

Thursday, January 02, 2014

Earlier this week the military announced the transfer of the three remaining Uighurs from the Guantanamo Bay detention center. The transfer of these prisoners could mark a significant step forward in the closing of the prison. Joining The Takeaway to explain the significance of transferring these men from the prison is Greg Craig, former White House Counsel who was closely involved in the efforts to resolve the Uighurs’ fate.

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Putin Promises 'Total Annihilation' for Terror Groups

Thursday, January 02, 2014

In recent days, two suicide bombings have killed 34 people in Russia and raised concerns about a terror campaign that could stretch into the Olympics in February. President Vladimir Putin has vowed to pursue terrorists to their “total annihilation” in his first public comments since the suicide bombings. Joining The Takeaway to explain what's next for Russia is Sufian Zhemukhov, a visiting scholar at George Washington University and expert on U.S.-Caucasus relations.

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Making Those New Year's Resolutions Stick

Thursday, January 02, 2014

About 40 percent of Americans make new years resolutions, but just 8 percent actually achieve them. Samantha Henig, digital editor for the New York Times Magazine, has been interviewing a family with an outstanding New Year's resolution track record. Robin Marantz Henig, a freelance science writer for our partner The New York Times, has been looking into the science of new year’s resolutions with the NYU Motivation Lab.

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Children of South Sudan Caught in Crisis

Thursday, January 02, 2014

Thousands of children are believed to have been separated from their families in South Sudan because of the recent fighting in the country, according to the aid agency Save the Children. Fiona McSheehy, Save the Children’s Country Director for South Sudan, discusses the charity's work in two UN compounds in the capital city of Juba, where displaced civilians have sought refuge. 

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Iranian Musician King Raam Makes Connections, Musically and Politically

Thursday, December 26, 2013

In our series of profiles of Iranians, both in and outside of Iran, we speak with musician Raam, of the post-punk band Hypernova. The band left Tehran six years ago after President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad cracked down on working musicians. Raam reflects back on the year in Iran and the future of musicians in that country.

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Surprise Pardon: Putin Frees His Rival Khodorkovsky

Friday, December 20, 2013

Russian President Vladimir Putin has freed one of his most significant political rivals, Mikhail Khodorkovsky, the famed Russian oil tycoon, oligarch and Kremlin critic, who has been in prison for 10 years. Putin cited "humanitarian principles" for the unexpected pardon. The move comes just ahead of the 2014 Winter Olympics. Joining The Takeaway to discuss Putin's sudden change of heart is Bob Amersterdam, former defense attorney for Mikhail Khodorkovsky who was at his trial ten years ago.

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Obama Commutes Sentences of Eight Inmates

Friday, December 20, 2013

Yesterday President Barack Obama commuted the sentences of eight federal inmates for crack cocaine offenses. Each inmate has been imprisoned for at least 15 years, and six were sentenced to life in prison. Aside from the eight lucky ones, 500,000 people remain behind bars across the U.S. for drug violations. Joining The Takeaway to explain Obama's decision is Mark Osler, a law professor at the University of St. Thomas in Minneapolis.

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