Streams

T.J. Raphael

Digital Content Editor of The Takeaway

T.J. Raphael appears in the following:

How Much Power Should the E.P.A. Have?

Tuesday, December 10, 2013

Today the Supreme Court hears arguments in the case Environmental Protection Agency vs. EME Homer City Generation. At the heart of the case is the question of who has the power to act on issues of controlling environmental hazards. Jeff Holmstead is a former assistant administrator for the E.P.A. who is now an attorney with the firm Bracewell and Giuliani. While the Obama Administration defends the E.P.A.'s right to regulation, Holmstead disagrees. 

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The Battle for the Future of the N.S.A.

Tuesday, December 10, 2013

Revelations by former N.S.A. contractor Edward Snowden have set of a fierce debate over national security and personal privacy, and the debate has become particularly intense for the Senate Intelligence Committee itself. Ryan Lizza, Washington correspondent for The New Yorker, discusses the past, present and possible future of the N.S.A. in his piece that appears in the latest issue of the magazine.

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Deal Reached on Military Sexual Assault Bill

Tuesday, December 10, 2013

The House and Senate have come to a compromise on a bill that would strengthen protections for victims of sexual assault in the military and keep Guantanamo Bay open. The measure is the first change to laws governing sexual assault in the military in years. There were 3,553 sexual assault complaints reported in the first three quarters of this fiscal year—a nearly 50 percent increase. Todd Zwillich, Takeaway Washington Correspondent, walks us through the ins and outs of this deal.

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The Myth of Race & Its Historical Consequences

Tuesday, December 10, 2013

Race is embedded the fabric of American culture, and racial categories and their implications persist today. In "A Dreadful Deceit: The Myth of Race from the Colonial Era to Obama's America," Jacqueline Jones, professor of history at the University of Texas, Austin, argues against our continued use of racial categories—at least in the ways Americans have used these categories since the country's founding. 

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The Road Ahead for Syria & the OPCW

Monday, December 09, 2013

On Tuesday, the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons will accept their Nobel Peace Prize in Stockholm. Last month, they triumphantly met their deadline for the removal of Syria’s weapons cache. Though much progress has been made, there is still a great deal of work left to be done. Sigrid Kaag, special coordinator of the joint mission of the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons and the United Nations, provides a look ahead at the OPCW's timeline for destroying all of the weapons.

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Retro Report: The Exxon Valdez Disaster

Monday, December 09, 2013

This week our friends at Retro Report look back at a cold March night in 1989 when the tanker Exxon Valdez ran aground off the coast of Southern Alaska, spilling 11 million gallons of crude oil into the waters of Prince William Sound and creating one of the worst oil spills in American history. Scott Michels, reporter for Retro Report, joins The Takeaway to examine how the spill happened and what we did and didn't learn from the disaster.

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How to Combat Poverty: Lessons from History

Monday, December 09, 2013

As the president and Congress debate the minimum wage and the efficacy of food stamps, a new book by Dr. Mical Raz challenges the underpinnings of our understanding of poverty and how best to combat it. In "What's Wrong with the Poor?: Psychiatry, Race and the War on Poverty," Dr. Raz argues that the theory of deprivation—which drove the Johnson Administration's approach to policy-making—led policy-makers to ignore structural inequality.

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Governors Petition EPA for Tighter Regulations

Monday, December 09, 2013

Today governors of eight Northeastern states plan to petition the Environmental Protection Agency to force tighter air pollution regulations on nine Rust Belt and Appalachian states. The petition comes the day before the Supreme Court is to hear arguments to determine the fate of a related E.P.A. regulation known as the “good neighbor” rule. Joining The Takeaway to explain is Coral Davenport, reporter for our partner The New York Times.

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Hundreds of Thousands Take to Ukrainian Streets

Monday, December 09, 2013

Hundreds of thousands of protesters took to the streets of Ukraine on Sunday to take part in demonstrations against the government. During the unrest in the capital city of Kiev, protesters showed their anger by smashing a statue of the Russian revolutionary leader Vladimir Lenin. The latest protest was the largest yet in almost three weeks. David Herszenhorn, reporter for our partner The New York Times, joins us from the site of the protest in Kiev.

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Holiday Etiquette in a Digital Age

Monday, December 09, 2013

It’s the holidays—a time of year when we’re expected to be on our best behavior. But how do you navigate a season steeped in tradition, in our non-traditional digital age? Gifts or gift cards? Invites or e-vites? And how much eggnog is too much eggnog at the holiday office party? Here to explain the ins and outs of holiday manners is Anna Post, author and etiquette expert, and the great-great-granddaughter of the Queen of Etiquette, Emily Post.

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Vast Number of Silent Films Lost to History

Monday, December 09, 2013

Silent movies are still the earliest cinematic record of our time—even if they have long been surpassed by more exciting forms of theater. Unfortunately, the Library of Congress has reported that much of that record has been lost to history. Dan Streible, a professor of cinema studies at New York University and founder of The Orphan Film Symposium, joins The Takeaway to discuss the significance of this lost record of silent cinema, and whether the U.S. can recover these pieces of missing history.

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As The World Pays Tribute, The Takeaway Remembers Nelson Mandela

Friday, December 06, 2013

“What counts in life is not the mere fact that we have lived. It is what difference we have made to the lives of others that will determine the significance of the life we lead,” Nelson Mandela once said.

Today, the world mourns the loss of the great Nelson Mandela, ...

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Fast Food Workers Strike in 100 Cities

Thursday, December 05, 2013

As fast food workers in 100 cities strike for a wage of $15 an hour and the right to form a union without interference, The Takeaway hears from two fast food workers about what it's like working in the industry—Naquasia LeGrand, a cashier at KFC who earns just $7.70 an hour, and Eduardo Shoy, a delivery man for KFC and Pizza Hut, as well as a forklift operator at JFK airport. Angelo Amador is the Vice President of Workforce and Labor Policy at the National Restaurant Association. He is on the opposite side of the debate, opposing the wage hike. 

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Can Obama's Inequality Message Win Back Millennials?

Thursday, December 05, 2013

President Barack Obama has revived his populist message and made a case for the Affordable Care Act as a vehicle to reduce income inequality. Jonathan Alter, journalist and author of "The Center Holds: Obama and his Enemies," explores the president's rebranding efforts. He notes that as Obama dusts off his brand of populism, his core base—millennials—seems to be abandoning him. Heather McGhee, vice president of policy and outreach at Demos, examines how the President's message about income inequality resonate with the youngest voters.

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Eating Healthier on Food Stamps

Thursday, December 05, 2013

Fast food appealing for so many Americans is because it’s often significantly cheaper than fresh, healthy equivalents. A new study offers one model of how to change that. By offering food stamp users a rebate of 30 cents for every dollar of fresh fruits and vegetables they purchased, the researchers were able to incentivize food stamp users to eat more vegetables and fruits by a full 25 percent. Diane Schanzenbach, Associate Professor in the School of Education and Social Policy at Northwestern University, authored the study.

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Can 'The Sound of Music' Remake Succeed?

Thursday, December 05, 2013

Tonight, a new version of “The Sound of Music,” starring Carrie Underwood, will be performed live on NBC. But early buzz about the special has been anything but kind. Can this remake succeed? Are there films that are, perhaps, to sacred to remake? Emily Rems is a fan of "The Sound of Music" and a cultural critic. She serves as managing editor for Bust magazine and she joins The Takeaway to explain why the internet and cultural critics are so up in arms over the new special.

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Kim Jong Un Ousts Uncle From Leadership Role

Wednesday, December 04, 2013

According to South Korean intelligence, there is a major power shift occurring in North Korea. Dictator Kim Jong Un has reportedly ousted his uncle Jong Sung Taek—the most experienced person in North Korea and the one closest to the North Korean Military. How significant are these reports? We turn to Dr. Sung Yoon Lee, professor in Korean Studies at the Tufts University Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy for the answer.

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A Call For Digital Christmas Lyrics

Wednesday, December 04, 2013

If you've got ideas about how your favorite holiday tunes can take a modern spin, send us your digital Christmas lyrics—upgrade "Santa Claus is Coming to Town," or choose any carol. Here you'll find the lyrics to one we received on Facebook from a listener named Karen Escalona. If you take a listen, you'll hear The Takeaway staff trying to do it justice.Please submit your own modern Christmas carol here, by visiting us on Facebook or by tweeting us @TheTakeaway.

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The Science of Charitable Giving

Wednesday, December 04, 2013

Last year, Giving Tuesday brought $10 million in dollars of donations to charities, though it's a small sum compared to the billions of dollars spent on all other shopping days like Black Friday, Small Business Saturday and Cyber Monday. Peter Singer, a bioethics professor at Princeton University, teaches a course on charitable giving and is the author of "The Life You Can Save: Acting Now to End World Poverty." He joins The takeaway to discuss why Americans don't give more.

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Holiday Window Displays Get Touches of Technology

Wednesday, December 04, 2013

All this week, we’re looking at the ways that technology is changing our holidays and our traditions. As we look at the digital migration of the holidays, we wanted to see how the retro department store window displays are responding to technology. Jeremy Bergstein is managing partner and head of strategy for the Science Project, which designed this year's Christmas windows for Saks Fifth Avenue. He joins The Takeaway to discuss the ways new technologies are being incorporated into the age-old tradition of holiday window displays.

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