Streams

T.J. Raphael

Digital Content Editor of The Takeaway

T.J. Raphael appears in the following:

Can You Trust The Media?

Monday, February 17, 2014

Over the last few years, technology has transformed how we understand and consume the news. A few decades ago, most of us read the morning paper or tuned in to the evening news, but those habits have changed with the growth of the internet and cable. As the news audience splinters, author Alain de Botton worries that the public isn't getting the whole picture. In his new book, "The News: A User's Manual," he argues that we need better training on how to consume and decode the news.

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Today's Highlights | February 14, 2014

Friday, February 14, 2014

Also on Today's Show: At least half a dozen states are looking to change their laws around alcohol this year, including allowing grocery stores in some states to sell either liquor and/or wine, reducing taxes, and eliminating mandatory “Sunday closing,” among other things...Our Movie Date team reviews this weekend’s releases, which include: “Winter’s Tale,” “Robocop,” “Endless Love,” and “About Last Night.”

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How Do They Do That? Inside the Physics of The 2014 Winter Olympic Games

Friday, February 14, 2014

The Winter Olympics is a spectacular combination of low temperature chemistry, physics, athletics, pure guts, and absolute beauty and grace. Beyond the costumes, the equipment and the music, we wanted to find out just how Olympic athletes do what they do. So we're pleased to introduce our series, "How Do They Do That?" Here we explore the physics of the Sochi Games. Our friend Eric Goff is the chair of the physics department at Lynchburg College and author of "Gold Medal Physics: The Science of Sports." He explains how the athletes flip, fly and hit the ice at high speeds.

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The Biology of Intimacy & Making Love Last

Friday, February 14, 2014

How do we make love last? Helen Fisher, biological anthropologist and professor at the Center for Human Evolution Studies at Rutgers, explains her recent research on the scientific underpinnings of long-lasting romance. The Takeaway also gets relationship advice from one couple, Jack Connelly and Bob Gaither, who began dating 37 years ago, in the late 1970s. At that time, they truly defied the odds as a gay couple and an interracial couple. They share their story, along with the relationship lessons they've learned over the past few decades together.

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News Quiz | Week of February 14

Friday, February 14, 2014

Are you a newsie? Do you know what's happening from Washington to Hollywood to Pyongyang? Are you one of those people who always need to know? Do you listen to the news religiously, convinced that what you hear will give you an edge? Be smarter than your pals. Prep your dinner party factoids. Gauge your knowledge about what happened this week, as heard on The Takeaway.

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Gay Discrimination to Expand Religious Liberty?

Friday, February 14, 2014

Kansas state lawmakers are considering a bill that would allow individuals and businesses to cite their religious beliefs and deny services or goods to a gay couple getting married or entering a civil union. Joining The Takeaway to weigh in is Kansas State Representative Barbara Bollier, one of 19 Republican House members to vote against the bill. And Allen Rostron, a professor of constitutional law at University of Missouri-Kansas City.

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"Being Ginger" and the Stereotypes of Red-Heads

Friday, February 14, 2014

Red-headed women are often perceived as fiery and dangerous. But their male counterparts are associated with different stereotypes - they're clownish, weak and maybe a bit hefty. Scott Harris, director of "Being Ginger," and Anne Margaret Daniel, a professor and blogger for the Huffington Post who specializes in the social history of red-heads, discuss why people across the world judge those with red hair.

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Openly Gay Eagle Scout May Be Banned

Thursday, February 13, 2014

This week, just nine months after the Boy Scouts of America lifted their longtime ban on openly gay scouts, 17-year old Pascal Tessier became the first openly gay member to be officially recognized as an Eagle Scout. But in six months, Pascal will no longer be allowed to be a part of the Boy Scouts of America. That’s because he’ll be turning 18, and according to the BSA guidelines, openly gay adults are not welcome.

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Today's Highlights | February 13, 2014

Thursday, February 13, 2014

Also on Today's Show: The winter storm system that shut down much of South and mid-Atlantic yesterday is now taking its toll on the Northeast. The challenge from this storm has come in form of ice...After three years of brinkmanship, confrontation and threatened defaults, both the House and the Senate have agreed to raise the debt ceiling without conditions until March of 2015.

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This Valentine's Day, True Stories of Love & Tech

Thursday, February 13, 2014

From the unusual origins of Craigslist's "Missed Connections" to the science behind eHarmony, we take a look at the tech powering online dating sites.

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The Future of Secondary Education in America?

Thursday, February 13, 2014

Chicago's Sarah E. Goode STEM Academy is working to prove that the old way maybe isn't always best. At Sarah E. Goode, students attend high school for six years, graduating with a high school diploma and an associate's degree. Rana Foroohar, assistant managing editor at Time Magazine reported on this story in a cover story for the latest edition of the magazine. Stan Litow, IBM vice president of corporate citizenship and one of the innovators behind the Sarah E. Goode school explains what his dreams for this model look like. 

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Today's Highlights | February 12, 2014

Wednesday, February 12, 2014

Also On Today's Show: Alaska has been experiencing abnormally warm weather this winter, which is presenting all sorts of challenges and even dangers...A federal lawsuit reveals that the corn refinery and sugar industries secretly funded Washington-based non profits and experts to grab market share and promote health risks of the opposing party's products.

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Syrians Evacuated Amid Cease-Fire

Wednesday, February 12, 2014

Thanks to a fragile but extended truce, the United Nations has been helping move hundreds out of the old city of Homs, but thousands of Syrians—including children, the sick and the injured—remain. Dina Elkassaby is in the Syrian capital of Damascus. She works for the U.N.'s World Food Program and describes how her aid agency is working to assist evacuees amid the cease-fire.

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Massive Winter Storm Wreaks Havoc on The South

Wednesday, February 12, 2014

Ice and a nasty wintry mix is causing major problems in states from Louisiana to North Carolina, effectively shutting down roads, closing schools, and cancelling flights nationwide. According to reports, the sleet, snow and freezing rain has left more than 100,000 homes and businesses without power. To get a sense of how people are coping, The Takeaway turns to Joshua Stewart, Morning Edition Host for Georgia Public Broadcasting; Pat Duggins, News Director for Alabama Public Radio; and Kearns Little the co-owner of Little Hardware in Charlotte, North Carolina.

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School Lunches Come With a Serving of Politics

Wednesday, February 12, 2014

Last year, more than 5 billion school lunches were served to over 30 million students across the country through The National School Lunch Program. In total, more than 224 billion lunches have been served since the program’s start. But with every lunch comes new criticism of the program. Marion Nestle, professor of Nutrition and Food Studies and Public Health at New York University, has given this issue much thought. She joins The Takeaway to discuss the main obstacles to better lunches and what the lunch program of the future should look like.

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Westminster Crowns Best In Show

Wednesday, February 12, 2014

The top dogs have been separated from the under dogs, crowning one canine best in show. This year there were nearly 3,000 entrants from around the world at the 138th Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show. But in the end, the judges could crown only one and they selected a 5-year-old wire fox terrier named Sky, giving that breed its 14th win in the 138th edition of Westminster. Here to tell us more about the winner, the losers, and the headline makers is Sarah Montague, WNYC’s resident dog expert.

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'The Onion' For Muslim-Americans?

Tuesday, February 11, 2014

Meet the founders of The Hummus, a new humor site with a Muslim-American lens and headlines like, “Muslim Daughter Feared Missing  After Father Calls 38 Times Within 5 Minutes” and “Conversion Of Ryan Gosling To Islam Halts Arranged Marriages Nationwide.”

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U.S. Looks to Target American With Drone

Tuesday, February 11, 2014

The U.S. government has identified an American citizen who is a member of al-Qaida and is actively planning attacks against Americans overseas. The administration is debating whether to kill him with a drone strike and how to do so legally. When, if ever, is it appropriate to use a drone strike to kill an American citizen abroad? Karen Greenberg, Director of the Center on National Security at Fordham Law School, examines this question and the future of the U.S. drone program.

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Today's Highlights | February 11, 2014

Tuesday, February 11, 2014

Also On Today's Show: The iconic depression-era child star Shirley Temple Black has passed away at the age of 85...The band “One Ring Zero” has released eight albums, including one where the lyrics were written by famous authors. Two band members discuss their innovative albums...Today The Takeaway gives you a look at the task of preserving the ancient art and artifacts of Egypt in a country plagued in recent years by unrest. 

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How Do They Do That? Olympic Freestyle Skiing and Ski Jump

Tuesday, February 11, 2014

If you're like most people, you might be wondering how Olympic athletes do what they do. Though ski jump is a spectacular combination of athletics, fearlessness, and beauty, it is ultimately about physics. Eric Goff, The Takeaway's resident Olympics physicist, is the chair of the Physics Department at Lynchburg College and author of "Gold Medal Physics: The Science of Sports." Mick Berry, a freestyle skiing coach in Park City, UT, weighs in on the precision and speed required to compete at this level.

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