Streams

Sarah Kate Kramer

Sarah Kate Kramer appears in the following:

WQXR's The Washington Report

Monday, September 20, 2010

David Sanger of the NYT joins Kerry Nolan to discuss what the Tea Party victories mean, as well as President Obama's upcoming visit to New York.

So Broken Hearted You Won't Vote?

Thursday, September 16, 2010

We've seen people doing a lot of virtual activism--they'll click and send and they'll sign an email petition or a letter to a congressperson, but what they won't do is actually get out, knock on doors, make phone calls, show up at a town meeting, rally in the streets.

--Paul Loeb, Author of Soul of a Citizen, speaking on The Brian Lehrer Show

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Nothing's Certain But Death And Taxes (And Arguing About Them)

Thursday, September 16, 2010

And that is what I find the most remarkable thing about this debate. Because it is so wildly irresponsible, even if you support them, you should tell the American people they're going to cost 3 to 4 trillion dollars depending on which platform you support.

--Jake Tapper, White House Correspondent for ABC News

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"Upset" and "Anti" Are The Words of the Day

Wednesday, September 15, 2010

Whether it's an anti-Democratic year or an anti-incumbent year, or an anti-establishment year, those things all kind of overlap. And it's probably some combination of all three, it's the less satisfying but probably the right answer I would think.

-Nate Silver, blogger for the New York Times' Five Thirty Eight blog

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Your New Ballot Stories: Frustration and Confusion at the Polls

Tuesday, September 14, 2010

We've been asking you to send in your primary day reports, particularly your experience with the new ballot design. You tell us your stories when you text BALLOT to 30644 and we call you back.

Your reactions so far have been mixed: Some people found the new paper ballots simpler - Jim Petzke said it was as "easy as eating a piece of pie."  We had lots of reports of nearly empty polling stations and people who were "in and out in five minutes."

But many of you reported problems. Organisational issues at the polling stations included missing ballots, broken optical scanners and long lines. Wayne Alan Blood wrote to our Facebook page to say that he had been "unceremoniously turned away" because the ballots never arrived.

There were lots of complaints about the paper ballots themselves. Voters called the print "tiny", and the design confusing and difficult to understand.

But the most outrage was voiced over what many of our listeners felt was a lack of ballot secrecy: Meryl Salvinger said poll workers told her to scan her ballot face up "which seems kind of crazy, with a poll worker standing standing right there, looking at it. I didn't really care, but that could be a problem for some people." Another caller, Greg Hofer, was livid:

"My voting booth was two pieces of manila file folders taped together at the end of the poll workers table. Anyone could have walked behind me and seen how I voted. In the forty years that I have voted, and I have never missed an election, this is the first time I felt exposed ... and I was absolutely appalled."

And it's not just the IAFC crowd that is finding trouble, Mayor Bloomberg has called the voting troubles a "royal screw-up."

Below is a running list of the reports we've received, updated throughout the day...

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Challenging an "Unelected Junior Senator"

Friday, September 10, 2010

We know that our junior unelected Senator was appointed by an accidental Governor and that New Yorkers should have a choice, they should have a choice of a real Democrat, and I believe that I am that real Democrat.

--Democratic challenger Gail Goode on The Brian Lehrer Show

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WQXR's The Washington Report

Monday, August 30, 2010

David Sanger joins Kerry Nolan to discuss the upcoming middle east peace talks, as well as the Fed's announcement it will take additional steps to prevent a double-dip recession.

The Human Genome Project: 10 Years Later, Progress but Still a Puzzle

Saturday, July 31, 2010

Ten years ago this summer, President Bill Clinton announced that the first draft of the Human Genome Project was complete. Standing next to the president, the lead scientist on the project at the National Institutes of Health, Dr. Francis Collins, said the draft would reveal the keys to treating common diseases like Alzheimer’s in just 10 to 15 years.

That hope turned out to be wildly optimistic. A decade after those six billion letters making up the human instruction book were plotted in digital form, scientists are still just scratching the surface of the fundamental mystery of why some people get sick and others don’t. Pharmaceutical companies have spent hundreds of millions of dollars yet they’ve found it frustratingly difficult to design effective gene-specific drugs.

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Epic Wimbledon Match Extends Into Third Day

Wednesday, June 23, 2010

The longest match in tennis history will resume on Thursday.

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Chinese Announcement Boosts Market

Monday, June 21, 2010

Stocks are rallying after China's weekend announcement it will allow its currency to appreciate against the dollar, a move that could provide a boost for U.S. manufacturers and exporters.

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WQXR's The Washington Report

Monday, June 21, 2010

David Sanger, Chief Washington Correspondent for the NYT, joins WQXR's Kerry Nolan to discuss BP's compensation fund, the upcoming G-20 summit, and China's announcement it will let the yuan appreciate.

Make Music New York Kicks Off

Monday, June 21, 2010

The annual Make Music New York Festival takes over hundreds of public spaces in the city today, the longest day of the year.

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Return of the Pipe Organ

Friday, June 18, 2010

Organist Paul Jacobs talks to WQXR's Kerry Nolan about the return of a 19-ton concert organ to Alice Tully Hall this week.

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Nebraska City To Vote On Immigration Policy

Friday, June 18, 2010

Following on the heels of Arizona's harsh new law on undocumented immigrants, some residents of Fremont, Nebraska, want to essentially make it impossible for paperless immigrants to live or work within city-limits.

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Met Opera's Finances in Dire Straits

Thursday, June 17, 2010

The Metropolitan Opera is losing tens of millions of dollars, even as expenses continue to climb.

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Israel To Ease Gaza Blockade

Thursday, June 17, 2010

Israel agreed to allow some building materials and food into the Gaza Strip, hoping to quell growing worldwide outrage following the flotilla raid.

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WQXR's The Washington Report

Tuesday, June 15, 2010

David Sanger, Chief Washington Correspondent for the NYT, joins WQXR's Kerry Nolan to discuss BP, the upcoming G-20 summit, and China's announcement it will let the yuan gradually appreciate.

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Spacecraft Returns After Touching Asteroid

Monday, June 14, 2010

After a 7 year, 4-billion mile journey, a Japanese spacecraft has returned to earth, potentially with asteroid samples that could provide clues into the evolution of the solar system.

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WQXR's The Washington Report

Monday, June 14, 2010

President Obama is using his first Oval Office speech to outline a plan that he hopes will force BP to compensate individuals and businesses for their financial losses from the oil spill.

Violent Unrest in Kyrgyzstan

Monday, June 14, 2010

Some 100,000 minority Uzbeks fleeing a purge by mobs of Kyrgyz massed at the border Monday, as ethnic clashes continue.

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