Sara Fishko

Sara Fishko is an Executive Producer and Host at WNYC, specializing in culture.

Her long-running series Fishko Files has become a staple of WNYC’s cultural programming, tackling a broad range of subjects, from a portrait of media guru Marshall McLuhan, to a meditation on the Symbolist painting  “Isle of the Dead,” to a consideration of the future of film criticism.  The pieces run on Morning Edition and All Things Considered, as well as Studio 360 and On The Media.

Fishko produced and hosted the ten-part Jazz Loft Project Radio Series, derived from a treasure trove of archival tapes recorded by  photographer W. Eugene Smith in his dilapidated Manhattan home in a loft building in the 1950s and 60s. The series, which ran on WNYC and NPR, later became four special programs known as The Jazz Loft Anthology.  

She has also made compelling hour-long programs featuring interviews with and performances by Keith Jarrett, Dave Brubeck, Ned Rorem and others. Her special program Culture Shock 1913 is a spirited telling of the history and development of Modernist art and culture in the early years of the 20th century.

Sara Fishko has won multiple awards from RTNDA (Edward R. Murrow Award), The Deadline Club, The Newswomen’s Club of New York (Front Page Award), The Associated Press and The New York Press Club. She received a Deems Taylor Award from ASCAP for the Jazz Loft series, and was selected as a USC/Annenberg Arts Journalism Fellow in 2003 and 2011.

Her blog Fishko Now and Then is about culture now and culture then, and it appears…now and then.




Shows and Blogs:

Sara Fishko appears in the following:

'Work' in the Movies

Thursday, October 20, 2016

From the archives: WNYC's Sara Fishko examines the way our working lives are portrayed on film.


Battling Over Brahms

Thursday, October 13, 2016

From the archives: A now-famous classical concert turned into a musical battleground – with very instructive results.



Thursday, October 06, 2016

From the archives: Warren Beatty captured the stories of early 20th century activists and combined them with star-studded drama.


Sara Davis Buechner Comes Home

Thursday, September 29, 2016

After years teaching in another country, a seasoned pianist comes home.

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The Jazz Legends Next Door

Thursday, September 22, 2016

Between 1957 and 1965 in New York, dozens of jazz musicians jammed night after night in a dilapidated Sixth Avenue loft. Sara Fishko's new documentary chronicles those years.


Jazzmen Keepnews & Monk: Good Together

Thursday, September 22, 2016

The late Orrin Keepnews had a special connection with a variety of jazz musicians - especially Thelonious Monk.


Family of Man

Thursday, September 15, 2016

From the archives: Edward Steichen took on the whole human race in his 1955 show at the Museum of Modern Art.


Jazz Photography

Thursday, September 08, 2016

From the archives: WNYC's Sara Fishko talks with two late, great jazz photographers about capturing musical giants on film.


The Loser

Thursday, September 01, 2016

David Lang's new opera at BAM gives voice to a competitive, frustrated concert pianist.


Committed to Memory

Thursday, August 25, 2016

In an age of instant access and digital recall, the Chiara String Quartet is committing their music to memory.

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Thursday, August 18, 2016

From the archives: As WNYC’s Sara Fishko tells us, the multiple-Oscar-winning Chayefsky fought to the death for every fierce and furious word he wrote.


Florence Foster Jenkins

Thursday, August 11, 2016

From the archives: As the subject of an upcoming biopic starring Meryl Streep, Florence Foster Jenkins may have been so bad that she was good.


William Bolcom

Thursday, August 04, 2016

From the archives: WNYC’s Sara Fishko interviews William Bolcom, the genre-mixing, music-loving, composer-quoting writer of all kinds of musical works.


Heart and Soul

Thursday, July 28, 2016

From the archives: Sara Fishko meditates on the mysteries of a VERY popular tune.


The Freakishly Empathetic Photos of Diane Arbus

Thursday, July 21, 2016

Photographer Diane Arbus’ work captured people at the margins of society and put them at the center of her provocative, mysterious, and unsettling portraits.


Romeo and Juliet

Thursday, July 21, 2016

From the archives: WNYC’s Sara Fishko charts several iterations of Romeo and Juliet, and considers how that classic Shakespeare tragedy inspired a great Russian ballet score.


Diane Arbus

Thursday, July 14, 2016

Diane Arbus formed a remarkable bond with her photographic subjects.


How New York Fashion Week Created American Style

Thursday, June 02, 2016

For most of the early 1900s, America took its fashion cues from Paris. But in 1943, Eleanor Lambert changed the game.



Thursday, May 05, 2016

From the archives: Reflections on the life and work of the gifted cellist, Mstislav Rostropovich, following his death in 2007.


A Face in the Crowd

Wednesday, May 04, 2016

The current political moment offers a chance to rediscover an old film about an American rise and fall. 
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