Streams

Sally Herships

Sally Herships appears in the following:

Policing the Police: New Jersey

Monday, June 23, 2014

The force is with you - and it's expensive. Internal fighting cost New Jersey taxpayers $29 million last year, and the Garden State isn't alone.  

 

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The High Cost of Cop V. Cop Lawsuits in NJ

Thursday, June 19, 2014

In New Jersey, cops suing other cops accounts for expensive settlements, where costs are passed onto taxpayers. Independent journalist Sally Herships discusses why police departments don't seem to do much to mediate internal disputes before they go to court.

 

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Here are Some Petty Reasons New Jersey Cops Sue Each Other

Wednesday, June 18, 2014

WNYC

A New Jersey Public Radio investigation finds millions of dollars have been spent on settlements involving local police officers. More often than not, it's police officers suing their own department. And the cost to New Jersey taxpayers is steep. Listen to what Jon Shane, a professor at John Jay College ...

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Good Cop, Bad Cop: How Infighting Is Costing New Jersey Taxpayers

Tuesday, June 17, 2014

WNYC

Police officers across the state are suing fellow cops and departments over everything from sexual harassment to being sent home for wearing the wrong shoes — and residents are footing the bill. We unearthed the details, and the latest tally.

Comments [14]

Update: NJ Police Complaint System Broken

Tuesday, February 12, 2013

WNYC

A New Jersey Public Radio investigation has found that the citizen complaint process at local police departments is riddled with problems, including retaliation and a lack of oversight from the state.

Comments [21]

Making Memories with a Microchip

Friday, August 31, 2012

Ted Berger is trying to build a microchip that can remember things for us. He teaches biomedical engineering at the University of Southern California, and his goal is to create a device that can take over for the hippocampus of the brain, translating thoughts into long-term memories ...

Comments [1]

New York City Takes on Silicon Valley

Monday, December 19, 2011

Mayor Michael Bloomberg announced Monday that Cornell University, with its partner the Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, has been chosen to build a new applied sciences and engineering school on Roosevelt Island.  It is another sign of his administration’s push to promote and expand the city’s growing technology sector.

Comments [4]

Making Memories with a Microchip

Friday, November 04, 2011

Ted Berger is trying to build a microchip that can remember things for us. He teaches biomedical engineering at the University of Southern California, and his goal is to create a device that can take over for the hippocampus of the brain, translating thoughts into long-term memories. ...

Comments [5]

Phantom of the Opera

Friday, August 13, 2010

Gabriel von Wayditch wrote 14 operas, some telling R-rated stories and one that's the longest in history. But hardly anyone's ever heard of him. Music curator Frank Oteri discovered von Wayditch back in the 1980s and has since been on a lifelong struggle to bring his music to ...

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Keep Your Eye On The Ball

Friday, September 18, 2009

In three-card monte, con artists use swift hand moves and constant patter to convince a sucker there's a way to win. A magician, a theater professor, and a real-life grifter each describe how the monte isn’t just a crime; it’s street theater designed to keep its losers entertained. ...

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Energy's Little Black Box

Thursday, February 05, 2009

If you knew where all the energy zooming into your house was being used and wasted, would you change the way you consume power? One company is banking on it. Our Power Trip heads to Redwood City, California to talk to Joe Polastre, CTO and co-founder of Sentilla. The company has invented an unassuming rectangular box that tracks —dollar by dollar, watt by watt—how much energy the appliances in your home are using. Clothes dryers and air conditioners beware: your energy guzzling ways are secrets no more.

Comments [2]

Magic Politicians

Friday, October 24, 2008

A good magic trick isn’t just a trick – it’s a story wrapped around a trick. Magicians distract their audiences with professional smooth talk called patter, and it sounds eerily similar to what politicians deliver in debates and on the stump. Magicians Steven Cohen,

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Bats Out of Brooklyn

Thursday, October 09, 2008

Okay, here's a question. What mammal in New York City is among the most important to the balance and health of our environment? Sally Herships discovered the answer on a trip to Prospect Park.

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IOU: Consumer borrowing is on the rise

Friday, August 08, 2008

Times are tough, so people are turning to credit more and more. The Federal Reserve Board says the rate at which consumers borrowed money in June increased more quickly than in any month since November.

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Everything Must Go

Wednesday, April 16, 2008

Flux Factory, the Long Island City based arts collective, is moving out. Their building and entire block is set to be demolished by the MTA. They're home to 17 artists, who live and work in the space. To mark the event they’re turning every inch of their home into an ...

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Missed Connections

Thursday, February 14, 2008

It’s Valentine’s Day and cupid is meant to be circling the city, bringing lovers together. But what’s a shy New Yorker to do on a day dedicated to romance? Producer Sally Herships combed the "Missed Connections" pages of Craig’s List. Here are some of the Valentines she found. This voices ...

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Meet Me at Grand Central

Thursday, August 16, 2007

Built in 190, Grand Central Terminal has long been a familiar crossroads for New Yorkers. But now some never before exhibited photographs taken in the1950’s remind passer-bys that throughout the well-known building lay complex layers of history. Captured long ago in an atmosphere thick with light and shadow Boris Klapwald’s ...

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Morality

Monday, August 13, 2007

For thousands of years philosophers have debated the essence of morality. Now, neuroscientists may have answers.

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Feminist Art Finds Home in Brooklyn

Friday, March 23, 2007

In 1970 artist Judy Chicago founded the first feminist art program at California State University. Now, thirty years later, the art world is experiencing a major resurgence of interest in feminist works.

Today, the Brooklyn Museum opens the Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art - a permanent dedicated home to ...

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Mozart Academy Trains Youngsters on the Cheap

Wednesday, January 25, 2006

Many people don't know it but Mozart was a working class guy who struggled to make enough money with his music to support his family. The Mozart Academy of New York is training youngsters to play and appreciate the composer's music-- without the financial burden!

They offer musical instruction for free ...

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