Streams

Ryan Singel

staff writer for Wired Magazine

Ryan Singel appears in the following:

That Facebook Disclaimer? Ignore It.

Wednesday, September 30, 2015

You've probably seen the declaration of privacy status making the rounds on Facebook. Trouble is, the post doesn't actually do anything. It's a hoax, and an old one at that.
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Net Neutrality: The View From Silicon Valley

Monday, May 19, 2014

A new set of net neutrality rules by the FCC means that content from the big guys with deep pockets would be privileged, while the little guys—the start-ups—would take a hit.

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Our Privacy Delusions

Friday, June 14, 2013

We all claim to want privacy online, but that desire is rarely reflected in our online behavior. In a story that originally aired in January, OTM producer Sarah Abdurrahman looks into the futile attempts we make to protect our digital identities.

Johannes Brahms - Violin Concerto op.77 in D Major

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Our Privacy Delusions

Friday, January 04, 2013

We all claim to want privacy online, but that desire is rarely reflected in our online behavior. OTM producer Sarah Abdurrahman looks into the futile attempts we make to protect our digital identities.

 

Johannes Brahms - Violin Concerto op.77 in D Major

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Google's New Privacy Policy Raises Many Concerns

Thursday, January 26, 2012

Google recently announced a new privacy policy that has users and privacy advocates up in arms. Effective March 1, this new policy will consolidate information from users' various products — from Gmail to YouTube to the Android mobile phone operating system — in order to "better tailor its services" for customers. But the move could potentially violate a users' privacy simply to better target advertising. Estimates say between 50-75 percent of the world's internet users utilize at least one of Google's products.

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SOPA Being Challenged Online and in the White House

Tuesday, January 17, 2012

Last Friday, President Barak Obama issued a statement announcing that he would not lend his support for the Stop Online Piracy Act, known as SOPA, citing concerns over First Amendment rights and cyber security risks. Introduced last October in Congress, SOPA would give content providers wide reaching powers to shut down websites distributing copyrighted materials. 

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Mastercard, Other Sites Brought Down by Wikileaks Supporters

Wednesday, December 08, 2010

All morning, hackers claiming to be fighting back on behalf of Julian Assange and Wikileaks have been attacking major websites that recently stopped offering services to the organization. "Operation Payback" has already brought down Mastercard's site, Paypal is under attack, as is a bank that froze Julian Assange's accounts. Meanwhile, Julian Assange is in custody in England, waiting to see if he'll be extradited to Sweden to face sexual assault charges. Ironically, the attacks on these major sites aren't all that different from similar efforts to bring down Wikileaks itself (one tactic being used is to take down the sites by pure volume of traffic). But how do they really work, and how do hackers decide what to target?   

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Julian Assange: Pariah to E-Commerce

Wednesday, December 08, 2010

In the run up to the arrest of Julian Assange, large companies, including Amazon, Visa and Paypal, refused to continue doing business with WikiLeaks, saying the site and its staff had violated various terms of service. Being dropped has meant WikiLeaks has had to change its online domain name, source its documents from a different web hosting company, and, accept donations via methods other than credit cards. Was this tightening of the noose business as usual or an unethical over-use of corporate power?

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