Robert Krulwich

Host, Radiolab

Robert Krulwich appears in the following:

Finding Grandpa On My Dinner Plate (Part 2)

Thursday, December 19, 2013

You order a lobster and the waiter shows you an animal that is, he says, older than you are. It's had more birthdays than you. For some people, this is a meal-stopper. Especially, if ...
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Why We Need Grandpas And Grandmas (Part 1)

Tuesday, December 17, 2013

Oldsters, it turns out, matter. They matter a lot. And not just in human families. I've been reading a new book called The Once and Future World, by J. B. MacKinnon, which points out that when we humans hunt game, when we fish the sea, we often prize the ...

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Why We Need Grandpas And Grandmas (Part 1)

Tuesday, December 17, 2013

The idea seemed sensible: Send young elephants from a crowded national park in South Africa to an emptier one, where they could form a new herd and thrive. The problem? Elephants need...
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What's That Clinging To The Towering Wall And Why Doesn't It Fall Off?

Monday, December 16, 2013

They look, at first, like dangerously protruding rocks on this towering, almost vertical wall in the Italian Alps. But then, uncannily, they move. What are they? And why don't they fa...
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What's That Clinging To The Towering Wall And Why Doesn't It Fall Off?

Monday, December 16, 2013

Maybe you've seen this, (it's gotten around), but I'm still gobsmacked. Totally amazed. We're in northern Italy looking at the face of the Cingino Dam, and here and there on the vertical stone wall, you'll see a few dark specks.

Here they are again, a little closer. They look like ...

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What Happened On Easter Island — A New (Even Scarier) Scenario

Tuesday, December 10, 2013

Whatever happened on Easter Island, it wasn't good. Polynesians landed there, farmed, thrived, built their famous statues, and then things went very bad, very fast. Sixteen million tr...
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What Happened On Easter Island — A New (Even Scarier) Scenario

Tuesday, December 10, 2013

We all know the story, or think we do.

Let me tell it the old way, then the new way. See which worries you most.

First version: Easter Island is a small 63-square-mile patch of land — more than a thousand miles from the next inhabited spot in the Pacific ...

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How Important Is A Bee?

Friday, December 06, 2013

This is an alarming story, not because it ends badly. It's alarming because it ends well. It shouldn't have, but it did, and biologists (and especially conservationists) now have a puzzle to ponder.

The story begins in central China, in an apple-growing region called Maoxian County, near the city of ...

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How Important Is A Bee?

Friday, December 06, 2013

When bees disappeared from central China years ago, Chinese apple farmers had to pollinate by hand. Embarrassing — people doing bees' work, but then came the big discovery –- a surp...
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How To Keep The Dust Off Your White Pants With 7 Desk Fans

Tuesday, December 03, 2013

Look inside most machines today and what do you find? Computer chips functioning mysteriously. Gaze at a 1920's Rube Goldberg cartoon and what do you find? Machines powered by hungry ...
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Science Reporter Emily Graslie Reads Her Mail — And It's Not So Nice

Saturday, November 30, 2013

I've said it before, so I'll say it again: Emily Graslie's "The Brain Scoop" is one of the warmest, slyest video blogs on the web. She's where I go to find out what museum scientists are up to — and right now she's at the Field Museum in ...

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Science Reporter Emily Graslie Reads Her Mail — And It's Not So Nice

Saturday, November 30, 2013

Reporter Emily Graslie explores natural history museums, showing us what's going on behind the scenes. Her viewers write her, of course, and in this video, she reads some of those let...
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On Thanksgiving, Everybody Needs A Friend — And That Means Everybody

Thursday, November 28, 2013

Today's a day to share, so that's why I want to share this moment: Two girls are on a city street, trying to figure out who's going to be friends with the nastiest person they can thi...
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Born Wet, Human Babies Are 75 Percent Water. Then Comes Drying

Tuesday, November 26, 2013

A fresh tomato is 93.5 percent water. A fresh baby girl or boy is 75 percent water. A banana, 74 percent. We all start wet, and then, inevitably, dry. A 1-year-old baby carries 10 per...
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My Wine Won't Stop Crying — A Mystery In A Wineglass

Thursday, November 14, 2013

Something strange happens when you slosh wine in a wineglass. The wine doesn't just settle. Some of it starts to "cry." That is, little droplets of wine slide down and then mysterious...
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Falling Into The Sky And Other Tales Of Gravity

Friday, November 01, 2013

You're high, high up. You lean over and look way, way down. Then you leap. Meet my favorite leapers: An Austrian who falls for 24 continuous miles, a medieval musician who leaps off a...
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Falling Into The Sky And Other Tales Of Gravity

Friday, November 01, 2013

For most of us, gravity is the tug that pulls us home.

Every time we slip off a ladder or somersault into a swimming pool, we feel the planet pulling us back. Austrian stuntman Felix Baumgartner took this notion to a crazy extreme last year when he stepped off a ...

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Putting On Einstein's Glasses

Wednesday, October 30, 2013

Whenever you look at the teeming, rich and oh-so-various world, if you've got the right eyes, if you've got the eyes of a mathematician, you will find patterns — simple, elegant forms...
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Putting On Einstein's Glasses

Wednesday, October 30, 2013

Whenever you look at the teeming, rich and oh-so-various world, if you've got the right eyes, if you've got the eyes of a mathematician, you will find patterns — simple, elegant forms hiding in everything you see. Those patterns explain why sugar dissolves in a cup of coffee, why clouds ...

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Americans Fall Behind In The 'Getting Older' Race

Monday, October 21, 2013

In the 1960s, Americans lived very long lives — among the longest in the world. Since then, we've improved our lot, but not as fast as the French, the Australians, the Swedes, the Bri...
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