Streams

Posey Gruener

Posey Gruener appears in the following:

Wave of Change: Freed Google Executive Reignites Demonstrators' Passions; 36 Hours in Captivity in Cairo

Tuesday, February 08, 2011

This is the sixth edition of Wave of Change, a special podcast from The Takeaway, covering the mass protests in Egypt and the consequences for the wider Arab world, hosted by John Hockenberry with Celeste Headlee.

In this episode, we get the latest from the streets of Cairo, where protesters have been reenergized after the broadcast of an interview with Wael Ghonim, a young Google executive credited with stoking the pro-democracy movement on the internet, who was freed after being detained for 12 days; we ask Micah Sifry, co-founder of the Personal Democracy Forum, if Wael Ghonim is a revolutionary leader or merely a messenger of the people; and, in an except from today's Takeaway, Human Rights Watch's Daniel Williams gives his own harrowing account of being held for 36 hours in captivity in Cairo.

(Watch Wael Ghanim's interview with Egypt's DreamTV after the jump.)

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Wave of Change: Inside Egypt's Military; The Legacy of George W. Bush's 'Freedom Agenda'

Monday, February 07, 2011

This is the fifth edition of Wave of Change, a special podcast from The Takeaway, covering the mass protests in Egypt and the consequences for the wider Arab world, hosted by John Hockenberry with Celeste Headlee.

In this episode, get up to date on all the events that transpired over the weekend in Egypt; in an exclusive interview, Elisabeth Bumiller of The New York Times takes us inside the generational divide in the Egyptian Army; and, Bush administration deputy national security advisor Elliot Abrams tells us why he thinks George W. Bush's "freedom agenda" was right for the Arab world.

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Wave of Change: Recapping a Tumultuous Week in Egypt; Egypt's Strategic Importance to the U.S.; Coptic Christians

Friday, February 04, 2011

This is the fourth edition of Wave of Change, a special podcast from The Takeaway, covering the mass protests in Egypt and the consequences for the wider Arab world, hosted by John Hockenberry with Celeste Headlee.

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Digital First Responders Fight Cholera in Haiti

Friday, November 05, 2010

Maps and cholera outbreaks have been linked since at least 1854, a year when London residents were dying in droves from a serious outbreak of the disease. At that time, no one really understood how cholera spread, or how to stop it. But then a man named John Snow painstakingly mapped the outbreak – by knocking on doors, identifying cases, and marking them down with pencil and paper. His resulting discovery — that the disease was waterborne — saved thousands and thousands of lives. One hundred fifty years later a lot has changed, but in Haiti, Snow's technique is still using mapping technology to fight disease and it's spread.

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Voters Vent Economic Frustration at the Polls, While Bankers Make the Policies

Thursday, November 04, 2010

Many Americans are angry about the sluggish state of the economy. On Tuesday, they went to the polls and took their anger out on elected officials. But the people who have a very large effect on the American economy aren't elected at all. They’re the appointed officials at the Federal Reserve Bank, headed by Ben Bernanke. As if to underscore that point, The Fed announced Wednesday that they’ll buy $600 billion worth of Treasury bonds, in an effort to stimulate economic growth.

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Quantitative Easing: The Fed's Latest Attempt to Improve The Economy

Thursday, November 04, 2010

The Federal Reserve Bank announced Wednesday that it will once again make a large purchase of Treasury Bonds — $600 billlion worth — as part of a Quantitative Easing to help the struggling economy. The response of many to this news: "Quantitative what?" Louise Story, Wall Street and Finance Reporter for our partner The New York Times, joins the show to break it down.

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What Will Historians See When They Look Back on 2010?

Wednesday, November 03, 2010

When future generations look back on this election, the first after President Obama's dramatic victory in 2008, will they see it as a repeat of the 1994 Gingrich Revolution? An unraveling of the Obama agenda? Or a chance for the president to rebrand himself?

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Verdict is in on Tea Party: Between a Trickle and a Wave

Wednesday, November 03, 2010

For Tea Partiers, last night's race was a mixed bag. Tea Party candidates did well in states that were already red, like Kentucky, and South Carolina, but failed to make gains in bluer states like Delaware. In Nevada, Sharron Angle, one of the most notorious Tea Party Republicans, lost to Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, the state's wildly unpopular Democratic Senator.

 

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For Senate Races, Obama's Visits Prove Mixed Blessing

Tuesday, November 02, 2010

President Obama has had a large impact on several key Senate races — for better and for worse.

In Pennsylvania's Senate race, Democrat Joe Sestak relied on Obama to rally the core group of African American voters he'll need to win the election – and it appears to be working.

But a little further south, in West Virginia, Democratic Governor Joe Manchin is facing a tough special election bid for the late Sen. Robert Byrd's seat — and has been repeatedly called a "rubber stamp" for Obama.

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Previewing the Senate's Likely 'Tea Party Bloc'

Tuesday, November 02, 2010

The Tea Party has grown up fast. Back in April, the news was dominated by images of scrappy rallies and angry voters. By November, Tea Party groups have backed some candidates who seem poised to win their races, and the movement has acquired both serious financial backing and a "godfather" waiting to help them establish power when (or if) they arrive in the Senate this January.

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Tight Races Could Lead To Recounts

Monday, November 01, 2010

On Tuesday, voters will cast their ballots, bringing mid-term election season to a close. Unless, of course, some races are too close to call. Polls show that close Senate and gubernatorial races in Nevada, Illinois, Pennsylvania, Washington, Wisconsin, Alaska, Colorado, Ohio and Florida could require recounts.

It’s an anxiety-inducing thought — and could potentially leave the House and the Senate hanging in the balance while the chads (or the absentee ballots, or the broken machines) get sorted.

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In Obama/Carter Comparison, Any Lessons?

Friday, October 29, 2010

Where are the similarities between presidents number 39 and 44?

Besides a focus on energy policy and putting solar panels on top of the White House, there are also deeper connections. Both Democrats rose quickly to power on the heels of an unpopular Republican presidency. They both faced an economy in crisis.  And they both spent a lot of time in office learning one important lesson, it's nice to have good ideas — but it's better to be able to sell them. 

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With One in Three Voters Still Undecided, A Look at the 'Persuadables'

Thursday, October 28, 2010

With just five days left until mid-term elections, Republicans and Democrats alike going to be making lots phone calls and knocking on lots of doors, trying to reach out and talk to undecided voters — or as they’re called in polling circles, “persuadables.” That little semantic shift that reveals how desirable these voters are and what lengths a campaign will go to in order to get them. 

But who are these persuadables? And what exactly do they need to be persuaded?

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Obama Administration Announces Big Spending Package on Transportation

Thursday, October 28, 2010

Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood's expected announcement of billions of dollars in federal grants for high speed rail today is beginning on a sour note. New Jersey Governor Chris Christie announced yesterday that he is stopping construction of an $8.4 billion Hudson River rail tunnel connecting New Jersey and New York. Citing billions of dollars of expected cost overruns, Christie says his "decision is final." This comes after LaHood made a personal appeal to Christie, and negotiations between the Obama and Christie administrations.

With Republicans running against President Obama's stimulus, an issue that's resonated with voters, LaHood's announcement comes at a questionable time. There will be events in Iowa, Michigan, California. There's also money for Connecticut and Florida. These are all states with close races. How is this going to affect the midterm elections?

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You Can't Say That On Television: NPR Correspondent Loses His Job After Making Racially Tinged Remarks on FOX

Friday, October 22, 2010

This week, NPR senior correspondent Juan Williams was fired, after saying on "The O'Reilly Factor" that he was fearful when seeing passengers dressed in Muslim garb aboard airplanes.

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This Weekend's Political Agenda, with Todd Zwillich

Friday, October 22, 2010

We're in the top of the ninth in the midterm election season, so it's time for the two parties to send in some pinch hitters. From Michelle Obama to Bill Clinton to Sarah Palin, Takeaway Washington correspondent Todd Zwillich takes a look at where the big names will be campaigning this weekend.

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NAACP Accuses Tea Party of Harboring Racists

Thursday, October 21, 2010

The NAACP and the Tea Party are feuding again. The civil rights organization has released a report called "Tea Party Nationalism" that has renewed accusations that the Tea Party groups “have given platform to anti-Semites, racists and bigots.” Tea Partiers are again disputing that claim.

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Virginia 4th Grade Textbook Claims Thousands of Blacks Fought for Confederacy

Thursday, October 21, 2010

A textbook distributed to Virginia's fourth graders states that African Americans served in the Confederate Army by the thousands. The book, "Our Virginia: Past and Present" was distributed for the first time last month to outcry from parents and educators.

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Thinking Our Way Out of Extinction

Tuesday, October 19, 2010

Are there limits to the kinds of problems humans are capable of solving?

It can certainly seem like it. The conflict in Afghanistan rages on, the schools keep failing, the world is warming up. We throw ideas at these problems, we dream up fixes, we try new cures, yet the problems continue. The conflict rages on. The kids keep dropping out. The hurricanes get stronger. It’s enough to make you throw up your hands and wait for the end times.

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Navajo Nation May Elect First Female President

Tuesday, October 19, 2010

The Navajo reservation spreads across sandstone and sky, covering almost 30,000 miles in Arizona, Utah and New Mexico.  

When Election Day comes this November 2nd, and the citizens of the Navajo Nation will file into chapter houses to vote, they'll find something historic on the ticket.  

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