Streams

Philip Quarles

Philip Quarles appears in the following:

The Democratic Machine: Carmine DeSapio and Jacob Javits Debate Ethics in Politics

Monday, September 03, 2012

WNYC

Speaking first in this 1955 debate, the Democratic boss Carmine G. DeSapio bristles at the question, "Is Tammany Hall fundamentally corrupt?" He dismisses such "sinister implications," claiming they refer to long-ago scandals.

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Sammy Davis Jr. Writes His "Emotional Soul" in Yes I Can

Friday, August 31, 2012

WNYC
Yes I Can was not treated as just another celebrity autobiography but regarded quite seriously as an exploration of racism and one man's confronting the highest and lowest experiences.
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The "Overpoweringly Witty" Fiction of Noël Coward

Wednesday, August 29, 2012

WNYC
C Noël Coward coolly rebuts those critics calling him "antiquated, snobbish, and belonging to an earlier, more complacent age."
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Senate Subcommittee on Juvenile Delinquency: Wertham Versus Gaines On Decency Standards

Monday, August 27, 2012

WNYC
The media changes, but the arguments remain the same.
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Comments [2]

Senate Subcommittee on Juvenile Delinquency: Comic Books, "Soda-pop," and Societal Harm

Friday, August 24, 2012

WNYC
The Nature v. Nurture wrestling match of the 1950s.
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Comments [1]

Van Cliburn's Musical Diplomacy Eases Tense U.S.-Soviet Relationship

Wednesday, August 22, 2012

WNYC

Fifty-five years ago this week, Van Cliburn was feted in New York City for his gold medal at the Tchaikovsky Competition in Russia. Our sister station WNYC covered the young Texan's triumphant return.

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Comments [3]

Arthur C. Clarke Dabbles in Science Nonfiction and Speculates About Space Travel

Monday, August 20, 2012

WNYC

"Around the close of this century." That is when distinguished author, scientist, and visionary Arthur C. Clarke, in this 1954 appearance at a Books and Authors Luncheon, predicts man will break free of Earth and fly to the moon. 

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Random House Founder Bennett Cerf, as Skillful Storyteller and Humorist

Friday, August 17, 2012

WNYC

Alongside his meteoric rise as a publisher, Bennett Cerf pursued his natural talent for writing humor. 

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James M. Cain, Popular Novelist, Argues to Strengthen Authors' Rights, 1946

Wednesday, August 15, 2012

WNYC

Novelist and screenwriter James M. Cain promotes his idea for an American Authors Authority that would treat literature as "property." Though it never caught on at the time, Cain's plan offers insight on present-day debates about copyrights. 

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Secretary of State James Byrnes: "The Temple of Peace Must Be Built Solidly"

Monday, August 13, 2012

WNYC
Secretary of State James F. Byrnes, walks a tightrope in the years immediately following World War II as the Cold War takes root.
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Ralph Bunche Announces Landmark 1949 Arab-Israeli General Armistice Agreement

Friday, August 10, 2012

WNYC
One of the few successful peace negotiations of the Middle-East.
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William F. Buckley Jr., Mayoral Candidate, on Political Rhetoric and Theater,1965

Wednesday, August 08, 2012

WNYC
William F. Buckley discovers surrealism on the campaign trail.
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Everybody Gets the Same Number of Lines: Marc Blitzstein's Socialist Opera, "No for an Answer"

Monday, August 06, 2012

WNYC

Musical prodigy and composer Marc Blitzstein, the featured guest on this 1941 installment from  WNYC's American Music Festival, increasingly identifies with radical left-wing political movements in the hardscrabble years leading into the Depression.

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Mary McLeod Bethune and Eleanor Roosevelt Comment on America's Imperfect Democracy

Friday, August 03, 2012

WNYC

Former First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt interviews her friend Mary McLeod Bethune in a 1949 radio broadcast in support of 'interracial understanding.' 

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Comments [2]

The Evolving Motherhood of Josephine Baker

Wednesday, August 01, 2012

WNYC
Adopting the family of man.
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Comments [1]

Gore Vidal's Historical Novel 'Julian' and Its Modern Parallels

Wednesday, August 01, 2012

WNYC

"I can talk for an hour without notes, but for 15 minutes, I have to read it. I shall look up occasionally to give an air of spontaneity." Thus, Gore Vidal begins one of his customarily suave and witty speeches, this one delivered at a Books and Authors Luncheon held on November 30, 1964.

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Louis Auchincloss Asks, "What is Serious Fiction?"

Monday, July 30, 2012

WNYC

In this 1964 talk, Louis Auchincloss, author of the new book The Rector of Justin, describes the great themes facing writers and offers generous advice to those of his profession. 

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Girls Who Fly: 1965 Angel Derby Pilots Are Told Sexism Doesn't Exist

Thursday, July 26, 2012

WNYC

This Overseas Press Club conference is a reminder of the unfortunately routine institutionalized gender oppression in American industry. Featuring deft pilots in the Angel Derby, an all-female air race from New York to the Bahamas, this panel's male moderator and reporters dole out condescension and hostility, but "the girls" hold steady despite the dismissive questioning. 

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Marian Anderson Speaks on Empathy, Attainment, and Race

Monday, July 23, 2012

WNYC
As eloquent in her speech as she is in her song, the contralto Marian Anderson on issues of prejudice and segregation head-on in this 1957 Books and Authors Luncheon appearance.
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Svetlana Alliluyeva's Graceful Defection from the Soviet Union

Thursday, July 19, 2012

In this recording from April 26, 1967, Svetlana Alliluyeva, the daughter of Joseph Stalin, fields a variety of questions from the New York press after leaving her homeland. "I feel like Valentina Tereshkova at her first flight into space," she confesses, referring to the first female cosmonaut.

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