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Philip Gourevitch

Co-Author of The Ballad of Abu Ghraib;

Philip Gourevitch is the Editor of The Paris Review, and a long-time staff writer for The New Yorker

He is the author of A Cold Case (2001) and We Wish To Inform You That Tomorrow We Will Be Killed With Our Families: stories from Rwanda (1998), winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Los Angelese Times Book Prize, and in England, the Guardian First Book Award. His books have been translated in nine languages, and his short stories have appeared in a number of journals. Before relaunching The Paris Review last year, Gourevitch had traveled extensively for a decade, writing from Africa, Asia, and Europe, and In 2004, he was The New Yorker’s Washington Correspondent, covering the presidential election. Most recently, he reported on Sri Lanka’s civil war in the aftermath of the Indian Ocean tsunami.

Philip Gourevitch occasionally fills in as host for The Leonard Lopate Show.

Philip Gourevitch appears in the following:

Peacekeeper Calls Syria Conflict "Civil War"

Wednesday, June 13, 2012

The conflict in Syria is escalating so rapidly and involving such sectarian violence that one U.N. peacekeeper has called it a "civil war." What does identifying the conflict as a "civil war" mean going forward?

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Defining the 'Tipping Point' for Intervention in War

Wednesday, May 30, 2012

All this week The Takeaway has followed the news out of Syria, where a horrific massacre at the hands of Syrian government troops in the village of Houla recently left 108 civilians dead, including a number of children, most murdered at close-point range. Are we at a tipping point in Syria?

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Is it Time to Intervene in Syria?

Wednesday, May 30, 2012

All this week The Takeaway has followed the news out of Syria, where a horrific massacre at the hands of Syrian government troops in the village of Houla recently left 108 civilians dead, including a number of children, most murdered at close-point range. Is it time to intervene in Syria?

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Rwanda's Cycling Team

Thursday, July 28, 2011

New Yorker staff writer Philip Gourevitch tells us about Rwanda’s cycling team, made up of Hutus and Tutsis. His article “Climbers” appears in the July 11 & 18 issues of The New Yorker.

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Defining Our Enemies, Defining Ourselves

Thursday, January 27, 2011

From Germany in World War I to Germany and Japan in World War II, to the Taliban and Al-Qaida today, the faces of America’s enemies have shifted over time. But how we define our enemies defines our nation in turn. We assume to be what they are not. How has this pattern affected the way nations see themselves and each other?

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Front Lines and Headlines: A PEN Panel on Covering War

Tuesday, May 18, 2010

Deborah Amos, Philip Gourevich, Arnon Grunberg, Sebastian Junger and Daniele Mastrogiacomo talked about the role of the journalist in war for a PEN World Voices Festival panel held at Le Poisson Rouge. Listen to their conversation here.

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"The Life After"

Wednesday, May 27, 2009

It's been 15 years since genocide devastated the country of Rwanda. Philip Gourevitch looks back on the genocide and efforts at reconciliation in his article "The Life After." It appears in the May 4th issue of The New Yorker.

Philip Gourevitch was on The Leonard Lopate Show in May ...

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What Would the Torture Photos Tell Us?

Friday, May 15, 2009

Last Wednesday, President Obama reversed his position and decided to block the release of photographs documenting abuse of prisoners in Iraq and Afghanistan by United States military personnel. His change of mind on the issue came after commanders warned that the images could set off a deadly backlash against American troops. The change in position was sharply criticized by the A.C.L.U.. Obama says he doesn't want the mission in Iraq and Afghanistan imperiled by an old fight. He may not prevail, but he has, importantly, shown solidarity with his military's view on this controversial issue.

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30 Issues in 30 Days: Do We Need a War on Terrorism?

Thursday, October 23, 2008

Philip Gourevitch, staff writer for the New Yorker and author, most recently, of Standard Operating Procedure, talks about the moral implications of America's war on terrorism.

Then Roxana Tiron, national security reporter for The Hill, talks about both candidates' positions on homeland security and ...

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30 Issues in 30 Days: Do We Need a War on Terrorism?

Thursday, October 23, 2008

Do we need a war on terror? A discussion with Philip Gourevitch. Also: another round of fact-checking candidates' claims with Bill Adair.

This Friday's Wiki-produced 30 Issues in 30 Days segment is on Arts and Culture Funding.

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Get it on Film

Thursday, July 10, 2008

Guest host Philip Gourevitch talks with teen filmmakers from the Bronx who just got back from shooting a narrative film in Uganda. Also: find out about a billion-dollar simulation of Iraq built in California's Mojave Desert by the U.S. Army. Joseph O’Neill’s new novel, Netherland. Plus, Underreported is ...

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Abu Ghraib: Standard Operating Procedure

Monday, May 19, 2008

Many American soldiers sent to Iraq as liberators soon were assigned to guard prisoners in Saddam Hussein’s old dungeons. Philip Gourevitch and filmmaker Errol Morris have collaborated on Standard Operating Procedure, a new book about the infamous Abu Ghraib photos of prisoner abuse, and how regular American soldiers became ...

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Finding Home

Monday, May 19, 2008

Where you choose to live is as important as choosing a spouse or a career, says Richard Florida. Also: Irish novelist Anne Enright. Philip Gourevitch on how American soldiers became both instruments and victims of injustice at Abu Ghraib. And a former lawyer talks about her struggles with bipolar disorder. ...

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