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NPR Staff

NPR Staff appears in the following:

Exclusive First Read: Erik Larson's 'Dead Wake'

Thursday, March 05, 2015

The Devil in the White City author Erik Larson turns his attention to the sinking of the liner Lusitania almost 100 years ago — a turning point that helped bring the United States into World War I.

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'It Is About Truths': John Ridley On His New TV Show, 'American Crime'

Thursday, March 05, 2015

The drama, about the aftermath of a racially charged home invasion, challenges its many characters' viewpoints. Ridley says he wanted to explore "what happens when those truths start to fall away."

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Boris Nemtsov: 'He Directed His Words Against Putin Himself'

Thursday, March 05, 2015

Russian journalist Yevgenia Albats, who followed Boris Nemtsov's career for 27 years, says he was one of the few Russian political figures willing to directly criticize President Vladimir Putin.

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Debate: Do Liberals Stifle Intellectual Diversity On The College Campus?

Tuesday, March 03, 2015

Are conservative views stifled in academia? Is it censorship when colleges withdraw invitations extended to controversial speakers? Experts debate free speech in an Intelligence Squared U.S. debate.

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What Shapes Health? Webcast Explores Social And Economic Factors

Tuesday, March 03, 2015

People say many things affect health, from personal behavior and childhood abuse to God's will, according to a new poll. The people behind the numbers explain what it means for people and communities.

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Ever Cheat At Monopoly? So Did Its Creator: He Stole The Idea From A Woman

Tuesday, March 03, 2015

The game Charles Darrow sold in the 1930s bore a striking resemblance to a game Lizzie Magie patented in 1904. In The Monopolists, Mary Pilon tells Monopoly's origin story.

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Wi-Fi Everywhere May Let You Roam Free From Your Mobile Carrier

Monday, March 02, 2015

To get the most out of your smartphone, do you really need a cellphone plan? That's the question a Wall Street Journal reporter tried to answer by relying only on Wi-Fi networks for a month.

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Liberia's President: Ebola Re-Energized Her Downtrodden Country

Monday, March 02, 2015

In an exclusive interview, Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf remembers how Liberia was "the poster child of everything that could go wrong." But people lived up to the local proverb: "Go fix it."

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A Most Vibrant Year For Cinematographer Bradford Young

Sunday, March 01, 2015

The man behind the look of Selma and A Most Violent Year talks about depicting violence, participating in history and being a black cinematographer in Hollywood.

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For An Author In India's Capital, 'Hope, In Many Ways, Is Fiction'

Sunday, March 01, 2015

In his novel She Will Build Him a City, Raj Kamal Jha weaves the reality he sees as a journalist in New Delhi — where many gravitate looking for a better future — into a fictional, magical world.

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A Standout Student, A Star At Goldman Sachs — And Undocumented

Sunday, March 01, 2015

Julissa Arce was a stellar student and an even better financial analyst, but she was scared to go to work every day. "Maybe today's the day someone's going to find out," she feared.

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Robert Christgau Reviews His Own Life

Sunday, March 01, 2015

One of rock music's most loved, feared and prolific scribes, the 72-year-old Christgau says he knew early on that he liked criticism better than journalism: "I didn't want to get into people's faces."

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Young Louisville Percussionists Love Led Zeppelin — And Jimmy Page Loves Them

Sunday, March 01, 2015

Diane Downs teaches music to the Louisville Leopard Percussionists in Kentucky. She says she hopes the kids feel like rock stars now that a video of their Led Zeppelin medley went viral on YouTube.

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This Weekend, Experience The Enduring Power Of 'The Millstone'

Sunday, March 01, 2015

Margaret Drabble's The Millstone, set in the 1960s, tells the story of a young, unmarried woman who finds herself pregnant. Author Tessa Hadley says this 50-year-old novel is a weekend must-read.

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Diversity Sells — But Hollywood Remains Overwhelmingly White, Male

Saturday, February 28, 2015

Women and minorities continue to be under-represented on TV and in film, both behind and in front of the camera, according to a new study — even though diverse films and shows make more money.

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'You Have To Be Bored': Dan Deacon On Creativity

Saturday, February 28, 2015

The electronic artist's new album, Gliss Riffer, is his most accesible yet. In a conversation with Arun Rath, he waxes philosophic on stress, technology and the value of a wandering mind.

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'Whoa, Mama!': A Voice Actress's Road To Fame As A 10-Year-Old Boy

Saturday, February 28, 2015

Back in 1987, Nancy Cartwright made a risky, last-minute decision during an audition: Instead of trying out for the part of mild-mannered Lisa Simpson, she went for the role of rebellious Bart.

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Pakistani Author Mohsin Hamid And His Roving 'Discontent'

Saturday, February 28, 2015

Mohsin Hamid combines the personal and political in his new book, Discontent and Its Civilizations. NPR's Scott Simon talks with the Pakistani author about his new collection of essays.

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Feet On The Coast, Mind On The Prairie: Tom Brosseau's Rootless Sound

Saturday, February 28, 2015

A Californian by way of North Dakota, with a voice that belies his gender, the singer-songwriter takes pride in being hard to pin down.

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The Persistence — And Impermanence — Of Memory In 'The Buried Giant'

Saturday, February 28, 2015

Kazuo Ishiguro's first novel in a decade follows an old couple on what might be their last journey: Hunting for memories of a son they think they had, in a land covered with memory-shrouding mists.

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