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NPR Staff

NPR Staff appears in the following:

A Holocaust Tale Unfolds On Two Levels

Saturday, February 01, 2014

The Houston Grand Opera is presenting the American premiere of The Passenger, an opera written nearly 50 years ago about an Auschwitz survivor who meets a former Nazi officer on a cruise ship. The opera premiered to acclaim in Europe in 2010 — but its Polish-born composer never heard it performed.

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Born Together, Then Torn Apart, In Civil War-Era Minnesota

Saturday, February 01, 2014

Nicole Helget's new novel, Stillwater, follows the lives of twins separated at birth — and raised on opposite sides of the tracks. Helget, who is proud to be called a "Minnesota novelist," tells NPR's Scott Simon about the photograph that inspired one of the book's central characters.

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'Spirit Of Family' Unites Ladysmith Black Mambazo

Thursday, January 30, 2014

South Africa's award-winning Ladysmith Black Mambazo has been singing its message of peace and unity for 50 years. The group joins host Michel Martin for a special performance chat.

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Two Months After Typhoon Haiyan, Coding On The Rise, Rape Cases Revisited

Sunday, January 26, 2014

In this week's podcast edition of Weekends on All Things Considered, the lasting impact of Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines, a beloved author writes in a new genre, and some U.S. cities look to reopen thousands of old rape cases.

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In Fragments Of A Marriage, Familiar Themes Get Experimental

Sunday, January 26, 2014

Jenny Offill's new book, Dept. of Speculation, uses anecdotes and bits of poetry to tell a nonlinear story of love, parenthood and infidelity. Offill tells NPR's Rachel Martin that her experiences as a mother inspired the book — but that her own marriage is far less dramatic than the one in her novel.

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At Great Risk, Group Gathers Evidence Of War Crimes In Syria

Sunday, January 26, 2014

William Wiley oversees a nonprofit charged with collecting evidence of atrocities committed by both sides in the Syrian war. It's dangerous work, and the group has suffered losses. Their sacrifices won't be in vain, Wiley says, but exactly how justice will come to the war's victims isn't yet clear.

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Growing Up 'White,' Transracial Adoptee Learned To Be Black

Sunday, January 26, 2014

Adopted by loving white parents as a baby 42 years ago, Chad Goller-Sojourner says he was an adult before he could love his own reflection. He tells the story of what life was like growing up in a family of a different race than his own.

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Take A Ride With Baltimore's Renegade Bikers, The '12 O'Clock Boys'

Sunday, January 26, 2014

A new documentary follows a dirt bike gang doing dangerous stunts at top speeds on city streets." I think it's a kind of escape for these guys; it's a kind of renegade sport," says filmmaker Lotfy Nathan.

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94 Years After Her Death, Maud Powell Finally Wins A Grammy

Sunday, January 26, 2014

Born in 1867, Powell paved the way for female — and American — violinists around the world. In 1904, she was among the first to record her music in a studio. And this year at the Grammys she'll be honored with a Lifetime Achievement award, alongside The Beatles and The Isley Brothers.

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'Le Divorce' Author Finds Stories Closer To Home In 'Flyover'

Saturday, January 25, 2014

Diane Johnson has spent much of her adult life living in France, writing novels like Le Divorce. But it was not until a visit home, to the Midwestern town of Moline, IL, that the Johnson discovered that her pioneer ancestors had lives worthy of writing about. Her new book, Flyover Lives reconstructs their stories.

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Eternal Vanity: 'The Art Of The Dressing Table'

Saturday, January 25, 2014

Ever since there have been puddles of water, human beings have gazed at their reflections. Our need to primp and preen, whether we live in the Bronze Age or the Space Age, is on display in a new exhibit at the Metropolitan Museum in New York called Vanities: The Art of the Dressing Table.

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Neuwirth Returns To Broadway, With More 'Class' Than Ever

Saturday, January 25, 2014

The Broadway veteran, who played the icy Lilith on TV's Cheers and Frasier, is back onstage in the musical Chicago for a third time — this time playing prison matron Mama Morton.

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Why Kenya's Best-Known Writer Decided To Come Out

Thursday, January 23, 2014

Binyavanga Wainaina made the announcement in an online essay on his 43rd birthday. He says the recent anti-gay legislation in Uganda and Nigeria influenced his decision to speak out now.

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Does It Matter That Lena Dunham Was Photoshopped By 'Vogue'?

Wednesday, January 22, 2014

Writers at the online magazine Jezebel criticized the fashion glossy for retouching images of the Girls writer and star. Adweek's media reporter tells Here & Now that Vogue should get kudos for putting "such a real girl" on its cover.

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Debate: Is The Affordable Care Act Beyond Repair?

Wednesday, January 22, 2014

Two teams of medical doctors and political columnists face off over the hot-button health care law in the latest Intelligence Squared debate. Is Obamacare fundamentally flawed or poised to transform the health care system for the better?

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Exclusive First Read (And Listen!): B.J. Novak's 'One More Thing'

Tuesday, January 21, 2014

The Office writer B.J. Novak expands his scope from Dunder Mifflin to the range of human experience in a new short story collection. We've got an exclusive excerpt — with readings by Novak himself, Mindy Kaling and Emma Thompson.

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Mission To Mars, Rhino Horn Heists, Camouflage Cars

Sunday, January 19, 2014

In this week's podcast, humans head to Mars, savvy thieves pilfer rhino horns, and Ford protects its new Mustang from prying eyes.

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Hard-Working Hollywood Extra Hopes For Bigger Roles

Sunday, January 19, 2014

Famous for a GoDaddy commercial that aired during Superbowl XLVII, Jesse Heiman says he's one of the hardest working extras in Hollywood. He's been credited in more than 70 movies since 2001. Heiman talks with NPR's Rachel Martin about trying to work his way up the call-sheet into larger, speaking roles.

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Life's Minutiae Gain New Magnitude In Dunn's 'Lines' Of Poetry

Sunday, January 19, 2014

Stephen Dunn's 17th collection of poetry, Lines of Defense, includes several works meditating on the death of his brother. Dunn, a Pulitzer Prize-winning poet, often features everyday details in his work — because, as he tells NPR's Rachel Martin, "we live with the little things much more than the large things."

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Laura Jane Grace, Transgender Punk, On Life In Transition

Sunday, January 19, 2014

"I don't have to think," Laura Jane Grace says of performing as a woman: "I can just be and exist." Joined by guitarist James Bowman, the leader of the revered Florida punk band Against Me! speaks with NPR's Rachel Martin about how her recent transition is playing out in the music.

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