Streams

Mythili Rao

Associate Producer, The Takeaway

Mythili Rao appears in the following:

Super Tuesday and Latino Voters

Wednesday, March 07, 2012

A Fox Latino poll of likely voters released earlier this week showed 70 percent supporting President Obama and just 14 percent supporting Governor Mitt Romney. The same poll also seems to indicate that the Republican party is having trouble winning new Latino voters -- and keeping Latino voters who have favored the GOP in the past. Poll numbers indicated that four of five Latinos who voted for Obama in 2008 planned vote for him again later this year. Meanwhile, among Latinos who voted for Republican Arizona Senator John McCain four years ago only 40 percent now say they support Obama.

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Former Minnesota Governor Tim Pawlenty Recaps Super Tuesday Results

Wednesday, March 07, 2012

Last night's Super Tuesday primary vote focused on just four presidential candidates from the Republican party. However, just months ago the field was significantly larger, with nine candidates. After Herman Cain, Michelle Bachmann, Rick Perry and John Huntsman dropped out of the race, they faded from the campaign trail. When GOP candidate Governor Tim Pawlenty took a disappointing third place finish in the Ames Straw Poll in August, however, he made a different decision by endorsing Mitt Romney for President less than a month later and taking a leadership position with the former Massachusetts governor’s campaign.

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Two Veteran Democrats Do Battle in Ohio

Tuesday, March 06, 2012

Dennis Kucinich and Marcy Kaptur have been friends for many years, but you wouldn't know it from listening to the attack ads the two Ohio Democrats have been airing against one another. While Republican voters in Ohio cast their ballots for a presidential nominee, Ohio Democrats in district nine will be picking between Kucinich and Kaptur in a Congressional primary. The race is the product of redistricting in Ohio — and it's just the first of many of its kind. In the coming months, 11 primary contests in states like Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and California will similarly pit incumbents against each other.

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What's at Stake on Super Tuesday?

Tuesday, March 06, 2012

Voters in 10 states weigh in on the Republican presidential line-up today in Super Tuesday primary elections and caucuses around the country. Four hundred and thirty-seven delegates are up for grabs -- but also at stake is the momentum of the campaign. Who is out there voting today? Is the Republican primary voter demographic in Idaho and Alaska the same as in Tennessee and Georgia? And who are they voting for?

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Tornadoes Leave Destruction in Midwest and South

Monday, March 05, 2012

A powerful storm system stretching across a dozen states in the Midwest and the South brought on between 80 to 100 tornadoes over the weekend, leveling entire towns and killing 39 people.  In total, 17 million people were affected by the storms.  The town of Henryville, Indiana was among one of the hardest hit when an "EF4" level tornado with windspeeds of over 175 miles-per-hour tore through the town.

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Syrian Rebels Withdraw from Homs Enclave

Friday, March 02, 2012

After receiving permission from Syrian authorities yesterday, International Red Cross workers are bringing food and medical aid into the district of Baba Amr in the city of Homs today.  The region has been under siege for nearly a month.  Yesterday, rebel forces announced a “tactical withdrawal” there.  The decision handed a victory of sorts to forces loyal to Syrian President Bashar al-Assad; it also set off a campaign of raids and arrests across the city.  The British-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights reported at least 17 people were killed yesterday alone.

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Did Stone Age Europeans Settle in America 20,000 Years Ago?

Friday, March 02, 2012

It’s the standing belief among most archaeologists that North America remained unpopulated until about 15,000 years ago, when Siberian people traveling over an Asian land-bridge traveled into Alaska and then moved down the West Coast. But in recent years, a series of surprising archeological finds at five sites along the Delaware, Maryland and Virginia coast offered evidence of a different possibility. Prehistoric blades found on the Eastern Shore of Virginia and in Tilghman Island, Maryland, appear to closely match those used by stone age Europeans known as the Solutreans.

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Severe Weather Tears Through the Midwest and South

Thursday, March 01, 2012

A storm system moving across the Midwest Wednesday morning caused tornadoes from Kansas to Kentucky.  At least twelve people were killed; six deaths were reported in the city of Harrisburg, Illinois alone where the most damage occurred. The severe weather also tore through country music resort city Branson, Missouri destructing the heart of the city's tourist district.

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Parkinson's Drug Improves Condition of Patients with Brain Injuries

Thursday, March 01, 2012

According to new research published in the New England Journal of Medicine, daily doses of a drug commonly used to treat Parkinson's disease has shown to improve function in people with brain injuries. The large-scale study showed that the drug, amantadine, can make a measurable difference for patients suffering from traumatic brain injuries. Doctors have experimented with drugs like amantadine to treat such patients, but this is the first time a study proved its effectiveness.

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Romney and Santorum Sharpen their Message for Super Tuesday

Wednesday, February 29, 2012

With Super Tuesday approaching, Mitt Romney and Rick Santorum used their speeches after last night's primaries in Michigan and Arizona to position themselves favorably. Santorum reached out to women after sparking controversy regarding his position on contraceptives, and Romney drove his message home with a new slogan.

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Repealing Virginia's One-Gun-A-Month Law

Tuesday, February 28, 2012

Virginia's state legislature recently voted to repeal a 1993 law capping handgun purchases at one-per-month. The law was designed to help curb interstate gun trafficking along what was known as the "iron pipeline" — the corridor along I-95 from the south to the northeast. In 1991, the federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms had found that 40 percent of guns found at crime scenes in New York had been purchased in Virginia. Two decades later, opponents of the law say that it's become obsolete.

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In Afghanistan, Rioting Over Koran-Burning Continues

Monday, February 27, 2012

Despite an apology from President Obama, protests and violence following the destruction of several Korans and other religious artifacts by U.S. troops have continued in Afghanistan and Pakistan. 30 people have been killed thus far, including four U.S. troops. As one of the most offensive possible acts, the unrest over this burning shows no signs of stopping.

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Rising Gas Prices and President Obama's Re-Election

Monday, February 27, 2012

With high unemployment numbers, a slowly recovering economy, protest movements like Occupy and the Tea Party, the economy has been a hot topic for this election cycle. And for some politicians, the most important economic indicator is the price at the gas pump: last week Republican presidential hopeful Newt Gingrich released a 30-minute ad that faults the Obama administration for rising gas prices.

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NATO Withdraws Personnel From Afghan Ministries

Monday, February 27, 2012

Over the weekend, two U.S. military advisers were shot dead in their office at the Interior Ministry in Kabul, Afghanistan. The attack is one of many since U.S. troops inadvertently burned several copies of the Koran and other religious materials while clearing out the base at Bagram Air Field last Wednesday. In response to the escalating violence, Brigadier General Carsten Jacobson announced Sunday that NATO had decided to withdraw its advisors from Afghanistan. 

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Marco Rubio's Mormon Past Comes to Light

Friday, February 24, 2012

Senator Marco Rubio generated a lot of positive buzz at this year's Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in January. A dynamic young catholic Latino from Florida, Rubio charmed crowds with his sense of humor and looked like he could be the perfect young vice-presidential candidate. However, on Thursday BuzzFeed broke the story that Rubio was, for a few years of his life, Mormon.

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Death Toll Rises for Journalists in Syria

Thursday, February 23, 2012

Since 1992 seven journalists have been killed in Syria, making it one of the most difficult countries to cover. Last Thursday, Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times reporter Anthony Shadid died of an asthma attack. Then on Tuesday  tragedy hit three more journalists.  A local videographer, Rami al-Sayed, was killed covering a bombardment. Also, two Western journalists — U.S.-born Marie Colvin and French photojournalist Rémi Ochlik — died when their makeshift media center came under fire.

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The Controversy Around Facebook Parenting

Thursday, February 23, 2012

Tommy Jordan, an ordinary dad from North Carolina, launched himself into internet fame when he uploaded an eight-minute YouTube video in response to a whiny letter his daughter posted on Facebook. Viewed 28 million times, Tommy's video outlines his anger with his daughter's online complaints about household chores, and as a finale, he shoots eight rounds at her laptop. The divisive video sparked much controversy across the country around parenting and social media.

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Ahead of Debate, Arizona Voters Confess Concerns

Wednesday, February 22, 2012

For the first time in nearly a month, Ron Paul, Rick Santorum, Mitt Romney, Newt Gingrich will share a stage in Arizona, at a Republican presidential debate hosted at the Mesa Center of the Arts on Wednesday. The latest poll numbers from CNN have Romney in the lead with the support of 36 percent, and Santorum coming in at a close second with 32 percent of likely voters. While Romney's lead is far from decisive, many Arizona voters have yet to make up their minds.

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A New Legal Challenge to Affirmative Action

Wednesday, February 22, 2012

Abigail Fisher, a white student from Sugarland, Texas, sued the University of Texas after she failed to receive admission. In "Fisher v. Texas," she claims she was turned down even though her application was just as strong as minority students who got in. Sometime in the fall, this case will be heard by the Supreme Court, the first affirmative action case heard in nearly a decade. With more conservative justices on the bench, the case could overturn the 2003 ruling that allows universities to take race into account during admissions as long as they didn't quantify their process.

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Electoral Demographics and a History of Presidential Primaries

Tuesday, February 21, 2012

In a recent op-ed for The New York Times, writer Timothy Egan makes this observation about the voters turning out for GOP primary contests around the country: "There is no other way to put this without resorting to demographic bluntness: the small fraction of Americans who are trying to pick the Republican nominee are old, white, uniformly Christian and unrepresentative of the nation at large." He goes on to make this observation about the demographic of the Republican primary electorate: "They are much closer to the population of 1890 than of 2012."

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