Streams

Mythili Rao

Associate Producer, The Takeaway

Mythili Rao appears in the following:

Status of Escaped Chinese Dissident Overshadows Diplomatic Talks

Tuesday, May 01, 2012

Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton and Treasury Secretary Timothy F. Geithner arrive in China Wednesday morning. Ahead of their visit, American diplomats reportedly met with officials at the Chinese Foreign Ministry to quickly reach an agreement on what to do about Chinese dissident Chen Guangcheng. David Sanger, chief Washington correspondent for our partner The New York Times explains the strain Chen's position is putting on U.S.-China relations.

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Occupy Movement Plans May Day Strikes

Tuesday, May 01, 2012

It’s being billed as "a day without the 99%" and it coincides with May Day — a day traditionally associated with worker's rights around the world.  Today, leaders of the Occupy movement hope to put their cause back into the spotlight. Janet Byrne, editor of The Occupy Handbook puts today's planned strikes in context while Brigid Bergin, reporter for Takeaway co-producer WNYC, checks in from Bryant Park.

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Meet 1WTC, New York's New Tallest Building

Monday, April 30, 2012

If wind speeds aren’t prohibitive Monday, a steel column will be lifted on top of the existing framework of 1 World Trade Center, making it New York’s new tallest building. WNYC digital producer Stephen Nessen spent a lot of time on the site of 1WTC this summer. He explains what it took to make a structure this massive.

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The Agenda: Osama bin Laden, May Day Protest, April Jobs Report

Monday, April 30, 2012

This week marks the one-year anniversary of the death of Osama bin Laden in Pakistan. Meanwhile, the release of the April jobs report on Friday will provide an important picture of the status of the recovery. Christine Fair, professor at the Center for Security Studies at Georgetown University, and Charlie Herman, economics editor for The Takeaway and WNYC Radio look at what's in store for the week.

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Hunting for Joseph Kony

Monday, April 30, 2012

In March, Joseph Kony jumped into the national spotlight when a YouTube video about his Christian militia, the Lord’s Resistance Army, went viral. Six months earlier, however, American troops were quietly deployed to northern Uganda to fight the LRA. Dan Damon, host of the BBC’s World Update reports on the difficulties facing US Africa Command (AFRICOM) in their hunt for Kony.

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The Middling Economic Recovery and the Road to the Presidential Election

Friday, April 27, 2012

It’s been a week of mixed economic news. Gas prices are down; jobless claims are up; pending housing sales are up. While it's been hard to put a finger on whether the recovery is progressing or stumbling, it is clear that as presidential campaigning pushes into full swing, talk about the economy will only grow heated. This may particularly be the case in the 14 states expected to be "swing states" this election: job growth in swing states has been well below the national average for job growth around the rest of the US this past year, and that could be a major cause for concern for President Obama come this November. Motoko Rich, economics reporter for our partner The New York Times explains the latest economic numbers, and what to look for in the months ahead.

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Suicidal Veterans Struggle to Get Help

Friday, April 27, 2012

The Department of Veteran Affairs says that 95 percent of patients seeking mental health care are evaluated with two weeks. A new report from the VA Inspector General, however, suggests those claims are vastly overstated — and less than half of patients are seen that quickly. The rest wait, on average, more than a month and a half. Former soldier Jacob Manning experienced the VA's limitations first-hand in January. After he unsuccessfully tried to kill himself, a friend convinced Manning to call a local VA clinic for help. He was told, to call back the next day because the clinic was about to close. Veteran Scott Swaim is the Director of Veteran Services at Valley Cities Counseling, has worked with many troubled former soldiers. He’s also a contractor for the Washington Department of Veterans Affairs’ War Trauma and PTSD Program.

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Case of Mad Cow Disease Found in California

Thursday, April 26, 2012

The discovery of a case of mad cow disease in a cow in California prompted two major South Korean retailers to immediately suspend sales of US beef. Although it's the first such case in six years, and was found in a cow not intended for human consumption, the news set off fresh worries about the safety of American food. Scott Hurd, Associate Professor at the College of Vetinary Medicine at Iowa State University. He’s also former Deputy Undersecretary for Food Safety for the USDA explains what's behind the beef trade wars.

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Supreme Court Features Prominently in Election Year

Thursday, April 26, 2012

In the run-up to this years presidential election, campaign speeches, political analysis, and polls always dominate the headlines.  But this year, the Supreme Court will be making big news too.  With major rulings expected on President Obama's health care law and SB1070, Arizona's contentious immigration law, the Supreme Court's positions are likely to sharply influence voter's perceptions on the role of government. Amy Howe, editor of SCOTUSblog explains how the Supreme Court's upcoming decisions could be game-changers this election.

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Former BP Engineer Arrested in Connection with Gulf of Mexico Spill

Wednesday, April 25, 2012

More than two years after the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig explosion that killed 11 workers and caused millions of barrels of oil to spill into the Gulf of Mexico, federal authorities have arrested Kurt Mix, a former BP engineer. Mix was among those tasked with monitoring and stopping the leaking oil; he is is accused of destroying evidence showing exactly what the company knew about why attempts to seal the leak were failing.

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As Murdoch Inquiry Deepens, an American News Corp Shareholder Weighs In

Wednesday, April 25, 2012

New evidence in a judicial inquiry into News Corporation suggests that a senior minister in Prime Minister David Cameron’s government secretly helped Rupert Murdoch expand his global media empire. The British public remains transfixed by the story, but equally concerned are American shareholders of the company. Simon Greer, CEO of Nathan Cummings, News Corp shareholder weighs in from New York.

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Walmart's Mexican Bribery Scandal

Tuesday, April 24, 2012

Wal-Mart stock fell nearly five percent to $59.42 on Monday after The New York Times reported that the company tried to cover up evidence of widespread bribery in its Mexican operations. Meanwhile, the Justice Department and the Securities and Exchange Commission have opened probes into the retail giant.

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Dispelling the Myth of the Monolithic Hispanic Voting Bloc

Tuesday, April 24, 2012

Conservative polling and advocacy group Resurgent Republic recently sponsored a series of focus groups with Hispanic voters in Albuquerque, New Mexico and Las Vegas, Nevada. The groups consisted of people who voted for President Obama in 2008 but are now undecided. Resurgent Republic says its findings "dispel the myth of the Hispanic community being a monolithic voting bloc." The focus groups were conducted by Impacto Group. Leslie Sanchez, author of "Los Republicanos," CEO of Impacto Group and member of the board of Resurgent Republic, breaks down some of the groups' key findings.

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Hulu Shakes Up TV Advertising

Monday, April 23, 2012

Every year cable channels and network broadcasters hold "upfronts," where they pitch advertisers on their new shows. Hulu, the online service that streams network TV programming, is pitching its own original programming this year, competing with the very stations it relies on. Brian Stelter, media reporter for our partner The New York Times, joins us to discuss how TV will fare in the age of the Internet.

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Levon Helm, Drummer and Singer of The Band Dies at Age 71

Friday, April 20, 2012

Levon Helm, drummer and singer for the Band, died yesterday from complications of cancer. He was 71. Songwriter, producer, and Grammy Award-winning musician John Leventhal played with Levon in the 1980s. He remembers a charismatic performer who was often like a character in one of his own songs.

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Tennessee Women's Basketball Coach Pat Summitt's Legacy

Thursday, April 19, 2012

On Wednesday, University of Tennessee women's basketball coach Pat Summitt stepped down from her job, ending a 38-year career. The move came less than a year after she received a diagnosis of early onset Alzheimer’s disease. Kellie Harper played on three national championship squads at Tennessee. She now coaches women's basketball at North Carolina State where she says Coach Summitt remains an inspiration for her every day.

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Economy or Personality? The Numbers Behind Obama and Romney's Vulnerabilities

Wednesday, April 18, 2012

As they look towards the general elections, it's clear that President Obama and GOP frontrunner Mitt Romney both face very specific problems. Romney’s problem is one of personality: no candidate in the modern polling era with personal favorability ratings as low as his has ever won the presidency. Obama doesn't have a popularity problem, but he does face some trouble with the economy: no incumbent president has ever won re-election with unemployment rates as high as they are likely to be in November. Carroll Doherty, associate director for Pew Research Center, and Kenneth C. Davis, author of "Don't Know Much About History," explain what is behind these numbers.

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Why Billionaires Get the Best Tax Breaks

Tuesday, April 17, 2012

There's a reason car accidents spike by 6 percent on tax day: filing one's taxes is stressful. On Monday, as millions of Americans put the finishing touches on their tax paperwork, Senate Republicans blocked debate on the so-called "Buffett Rule." It would have required the wealthiest Americans to pay at least 30 percent of their income in federal taxes. The rule was inspired by Warren Buffett's secretary, who pays a higher tax rate than her billionaire boss. Bob Hennelly, senior reporter for WNYC has been investigating the tax rates of another billionaire with some tax policy suggestions: New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg.

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Secret Service Agents to be Investigated for Misconduct

Monday, April 16, 2012

Eleven Secret Service employees are accused of bringing prostitutes back to their hotel in Cartagena ahead of President Obama's visit for a summit in Colombia. The agents and officers have been placed on leave while the agency investigates their conduct. Although prostitution is legal in parts of Colombia and no law was broken, if the reports are true, the employees still violated rules of conduct. Tim Weiner, author of "Enemies: A History of the FBI," has won the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award for his work on national security. Weiner explains what happened and why the employees' alleged indiscretions could have put the President Obama's life at risk.

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Taliban Stages Coordinated Attacks on Kabul and Afghan Provinces

Monday, April 16, 2012

Over the weekend, Taliban bombers and attackers launched their spring offensive with a series of coordinated attacks on Afghan government offices in Kabul and across three eastern provinces. Dozens of fighters assaulted NATO bases, embassies, the Afghan parliament and other government buildings with suicide attacks, rockets and gunfire. In all, the attack lasted more than five hours. NATO forces called the assault “largely ineffective” — saying it caused only "light casualties" to Afghan units. Still, Peter Galbraith, former UN deputy special representative, for Afghanistan says the Taliban’s onslaught emphasizes just how vulnerable the capital has become — and casts new doubts on NATO’s transition plans.

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