Streams

Mythili Rao

Associate Producer

Mythili Rao appears in the following:

I.R.A. Hunger Strike Participant Reflects on What it's Like to Strike

Friday, June 07, 2013

The historic strike underway at Guantanamo is one in a long line of hunger strikes we’ve seen in the past century. One of the most dramatic strikes in recent decades came in 1980 when imprisoned I.R.A. members went on strike. Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher refused to negotiate with the strikers and in total 10 prisoners starved themselves to death. Irish republican fighter Pat Sheehan was part of that strike led by Bobby Sands. By the time the fast ended, Pat had gone 55 days without food.

Comments [3]

Philadelphia Building Collapse: 6 Dead, 14 Injured

Thursday, June 06, 2013

Six people were killed and 14 injured an after a Salvation Army thrift store building collapsed in central Philadelphia yesterday. A neighboring building was in the process of being demolished, when one of its walls suddenly gave way, sending bricks, wood, concrete, and cinder blocks onto the Salvation Army store. Elizabeth Fiedler, WHYY reporter, explains.

Comment

'The Buy Side' and Wall Street's Dark Side

Wednesday, June 05, 2013

In 1994, Turney Duff was a fresh-faced journalism graduate from Ohio University with no clear career plan.  He moved to New York and called up a rich uncle who worked at Morgan Stanley.  A few phone calls later, Duff had his first job in finance, in an asset-management division of Morgan Stanley.  Over the next 15 years, Duff climbed the ranks of Wall Street, eventually acquiring a 7-figure salary as well as a cocaine addiction. He recalls his high flying days and downfall on Wall Street in a new memoir, “The Buy Side: A Wall Street Trader’s Tale of Spectacular Excess.” 

Comments [4]

Pushing for More Transparency in Bradley Manning Trial

Tuesday, June 04, 2013

More than three years after his arrest and after months and months of pretrial hearings, the trial of Army Private Bradley Manning finally began this week at Fort Meade. But his trial is shrouded in secrecy.  Motions, briefs, and transcripts of pre-trial hearings have not been released, making it hard for the press and public to follow the proceedings. Shayana Kadidal, Senior Managing Attorney at the Center for Constitutional Rights is among those pushing for greater transparency in this trial.

Comments [2]

Anti-Government Protests Erupt in Turkey

Monday, June 03, 2013

Tens of thousands of protesters have taken to the streets of Turkey in protest. So far, more than seventeen hundred people have been arrested. The protests began over government plans to build a shopping mall on Istanbul's Taksim Park, but they have grown into a more comprehensive rejection of what demonstrators say is the Prime Minister's dictatorial ambitions. 

Comments [1]

Is Syrian President Assad Winning?

Friday, May 31, 2013

Increasingly, it seems Syrian President Assad has good reasons to be confident.  Syria’s allies are standing firm while Syrian opposition and international community remain unable to organize a strong, unified response. Is President Assad winning in Syria? Michael Weiss, columnist for NOW Lebanon and fellow at the Institute for Modern Russia has been following events in Syria closely.

Comments [1]

Budget Deficit Shrinks as Consumer Confidence Grows

Thursday, May 30, 2013

The federal budget deficit is shrinking. What’s more, it’s shrinking far faster than anyone in Washington anticipated it would. That bit of information, together with a slew of other recent economic reports about the state of the housing market and consumer confidence paint a brighter picture of the economy than we’ve gotten used to seeing. Charlie Herman, WNYC Business Editor breaks down the numbers.

Comments [5]

Was the I.R.S. Correct to Flag Certain Organizations for Additional Review?

Wednesday, May 29, 2013

Was the I.R.S. correct to flag certain organizations applying for tax-exempt status for additional review? New analysis from The New York Times finds that in many cases groups singled out by the I.R.S. may in fact have been involved in “improper campaign activities.”  So how, under ordinary circumstances, does the agency go about trying to check-up on organizations that apply for tax-exempt status? As the former director of the I.R.S.’s Exempt Organizations Division, Marcus Owens has a few ideas about what the organization is supposed to do to ordinarily handle these kinds of cases.

Comments [5]

Congressman Tom Cole on Oklahoma's Recovery

Tuesday, May 28, 2013

When it comes to bad weather, Oklahoma is all too familiar with disaster. Last week's tornado in Moore, Oklahoma was the 74th presidential disaster declared in the state in the past 60 years. The state is No. 1 in tornado disasters and No. 3 for flooding. Congressman Tom Cole discusses the state’s tornado recovery effort—and where relief funding should come from.

Comments [1]

What's Next in IRS Inquiry?

Friday, May 24, 2013

In Washington, the attention of lawmakers remains focused on a scandal stemming from the IRS and the scrutiny it applied to Tea Party groups seeking tax-exempt status. Earlier this week, Lois Lerner, who runs the IRS’s division on tax-exempt organizations, told Congress she had broken no laws and committed no wrongdoing.  She also said she would not testify. That of course was not enough of an answer for some GOP lawmakers.

Comments [4]

President Obama Seeks to Narrow 'War on Terror'

Friday, May 24, 2013

In the first major counter-terrorism speech of his second term, President Obama outlined guidelines for the use of drone strikes, laid out plans to close Guantanamo and sought to find a way to finally end the war on terror.

Comments [3]

FBI Investigation of Man with Ties to Boston Bombing Suspect Ends in Shooting

Thursday, May 23, 2013

A mystifying development in the investigation of the alleged Boston Marathon bombing suspects came early Wednesday morning when an F.B.I. agent shot and killed a Chechen man named Ibragim Todashev in Orlando, Florida. Phillip Martin, Senior Investigative Reporter for The Takeaway's partner WGBH in Boston, explains Todashev's involvement with Tsnarnaevs. 

Comment

Why Closing Guantánamo Bay Might Not Enough

Thursday, May 23, 2013

Today, as President Obama refocuses the nation's counter-terrorism policies, he will also address the on-going efforts to close the Guantánamo Bay detention facility. Previously, as a Human Rights Watch advocate and attorney for the Department of Justice, Jennifer Daskal argued for the facility to be closed immediately. Now, though, she says that the issue is so complicated that simply closing the facility might not be enough.

Comments [1]

Teachers: Unsung Heroes of the Oklahoma City Tornado

Wednesday, May 22, 2013

As the road to recovery begins for the people affected by the Oklahoma City Tornado Monday, unsung heroes have emerged out of this tragedy. People whose jobs helped to save lives, keep others calm, and keep the public informed. Among them are the school teachers who rushed their students to safety.

Comments [3]

More than a Weather Man

Wednesday, May 22, 2013

In some parts of the country, the meteorologist on the local news is more than just a weatherman. He’s a life-saver, a legend, a guardian. Few meteorologists fit that profile more than News 9’s Michael Armstrong.

Comment

As Syrian Conflict Deepens, Violence Bleeds into Iraq and Lebanon

Tuesday, May 21, 2013

As the Syrian conflict deepens, increasingly, the violence appears to be spilling beyond the country’s borders. Some of the worst fighting in recent days has been centered around the city of Qusayr, where the death toll for Hezbollah fighters supporting President Bashar al-Assad has been steadily rising. 

Comment

What the James Rosen Case Says About the Freedom of the Press

Tuesday, May 21, 2013

New details are emerging about about a Justice Department investigation into Fox news correspondent James Rosen, raising questions about how often journalists have been investigated what investigations like this one mean for freedom of the American press. David Sanger is Chief Washington Correspondent for our partner The New York Times, and can speak to this issue from personal experience. In the past, he himself was the subject of an investigation.

Comments [1]

How Long Will the War on Terror Last?

Monday, May 20, 2013

How long will the war on terror last?  Another five years? Or ten years? That question was put to a senior Pentagon official by Congress last week during hearings by the Senate Armed Services Committee over whether to revise the AUMF, the Authorization to Use Military Force. Fred Kaplan, Slate's "War Stories" columnist and author of the book, “The Insurgents: David Petraeus and the Plot to Change the American Way of War,” explains what the AUMF means and why its extension matters.

Comment

'David's Inferno': Depression's Lessons

Friday, May 17, 2013

Next week when the fifth Diagnostic and Statistical Manual is released it's expected to bring with it new debate on the definition of illness itself -- about what's a disorder and what's just another kind of normal. This is a question that interests David Blistein, author of “David’s Inferno: My Journey through the Dark Wood of Depression.”  His book chronicles his struggle with debilitating depression.  That process that made him consider that maybe depression is more than just an illness.

Comments [1]

Revisiting the Tailhook Sexual Assault Scandal

Thursday, May 16, 2013

In 1992, a young Navy lieutenant named Paula Coughlin stepped forward to make a startling allegation. She said she and many other women had been sexually assaulted at the Navy's annual Tailhook Symposium in Las Vegas. It appeared that Paula's story had shifted something fundamental in the military. But more than 20 years later, the statistics tell a different story.

Comments [1]