Streams

Megan Quellhorst

The Takeaway

Megan Quellhorst appears in the following:

Five Years After the Financial Collapse, Is the Economy Still at Risk?

Monday, September 09, 2013

Five years ago this month, global markets were stunned when Lehman Brothers collapsed. Anat Admati is the author of “The Bankers’ New Clothes” and a professor of finance and economics at Stanford’s graduate school of business. She discusses the climate that led to Lehman’s collapse and the security of the financial system today.

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The Takeaway Answers Listener Questions on U.S Intervention in Syria

Friday, September 06, 2013

The Senate and the House directed their concerns and inquiries to Secretary of State John Kerry, Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel, and Gen. Martin Dempsey, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Takeaway listeners left us with dozens of thoughtful questions to be considered before a decision is made on Syria. Our host John Hockenberry looks to the hearings to bring answers to you here.

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Is U.S. Credibility Really on The Line With Syria?

Thursday, September 05, 2013

If there were a word of the week, it would likely be credibility. As Congress debates authorizing military intervention in Syria in response to a chemical weapons attack last month, politicians are insisting that credibility is on the line. Nicholas Kristof, a columnist for the New York Times, weighs in on where America's credibility in the Middle East stands today—and what we stand to lose by not intervening.

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Building a Frozen Wall at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant

Thursday, September 05, 2013

Earlier this week the Japanese government announced plans to spend $500 million on a new effort to build a frozen wall to stabilize the Fukishima Daiichi nuclear plant, the site of the worst nuclear accident since Chernobyl. Arjun Makhijani, an engineer specializing in nuclear fission and the president of the Institute for Energy and Environmental Research, explains how that frozen wall would work.

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Outsiders: Challenging Society's Idea of Normal

Wednesday, September 04, 2013

Fringe culture has always existed, but how do we define outsiders today? Journalist Alissa Quart is the author of a new book, “Republic of Outsiders: The Power of Amateurs, Rebels and Dreamers.” She joins the program to explore why and how Americans think outside of the box today.

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What Does U.S. Intervention in Syria Mean for Israel?

Wednesday, September 04, 2013

Does Israel see President Obama's decision as a hesitation? And what does this portend for Israel's tensions with Iran? Weighing in is Ambassador Itamar Rabinovich, the Israeli Ambassador to the United States from 1993 to 1996. He was the chief negotiator with Syria in the 1990s.

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Veterans Weigh In on U.S. Intervention in Syria

Tuesday, September 03, 2013

As Congress and the country deliberates on U.S. involvement in Syria, we turn to veterans of America's recent wars in Iraq and Afghanistan to find out how they feel about the prospect of another American intervention. Hugh Martin served with the Ohio National Guard in Iraq in 2004. Kristen Rouse is a Captain in the Army National Guard and a veteran of the war in Afghanistan. She served three tours of duty for a total of 31 months spent in the country.

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The Dreams of the Undocumented Community

Friday, August 30, 2013

Jose Antonio Vargas is a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and Founder of Define America. He says that while there are obvious differences between the civil rights struggles of African Americans 50 years ago and those of undocumented immigrants today, he draws inspiration from their struggles and sees points of commonality.

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50 Years After the March on Washington, A Look At Dreams for the Next 50 Years

Wednesday, August 28, 2013

On this 50th anniversary of the March on Washington, we turn an eye toward the future of the civil rights movement and the dreams of this generation of activists. Rashad Robinson is the Executive Director of Color of Change, and Majora Carter is the founder of the non-profit Sustainable Bronx. They are just two examples of black Americans who are dedicating their lives to improving the lives of some of America's most marginalized communities.

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Roundtable: The March on Washington & The Future of the Civil Rights Movement

Wednesday, August 28, 2013

Joining The Takeaway to discuss the future of the civil rights movement and what can be done to accomplish the objectives of the March on Washington, which took place 50 years ago today, is Farai Chideya, a distinguished writer in residence at New York University’s Journalism Institute; Peter Blair Henry, the Dean of New York University’s Stern School of Business; and George Packer, a staff writer at The New Yorker.

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Remembering the March on Washington & Next Steps for Civil Rights

Tuesday, August 27, 2013

Fifty years ago tomorrow, 250,000 protesters from across the country converged on the Washington Mall for the 1963 March on Washington. Dorothy Pitman Hughes is a civil rights activist who helped to organize the march. Though 50 years have gone by, she says the country and we all as Americans still have much work left to do.

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Reflecting on the March on Washington

Monday, August 26, 2013

This week, The Takeaway remembers the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington. Joyce Ladner was a field secretary for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee at the March on Washington. It was the violence of her childhood growing up in Mississippi amidst poverty and deeply rooted racism that inspired her activism.

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Activists Confront a Changing Voting Rights Landscape

Friday, August 23, 2013

This week, The Takeaway has gone on a voting rights tour, examining how the Supreme Court decision in Shelby County Vs. Holder has changed voting laws across the country. Today, Marvin Randolph, senior vice president for campaigns at the NAACP, explains how his organization has had to revamp its get-out-the-vote strategies in light of the Supreme Court's voting rights decision. 

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INFOGRAPHIC: What the Data Tells Us About Voting in America

Friday, August 23, 2013

This week, we've taken you on a voting rights tour of America. to states where the Supreme Court decision in Shelby County Vs. Holder has changed voting laws. What does the data tell us? For that we turn to Dante Chinni, the director of the American Communities Project at American University. He crunched the numbers on voter turnout during the 2012 election.

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Revisiting the Civil Rights Movement Ahead of the March on Washington's 50th Anniversary

Friday, August 23, 2013

On the morning of August 28th 1963 the idea of America was tested and in the sounds of feet stepping and buses parking, there was a sign early that day that something would happen. It would not be a normal day, in Washington, in America, in the world. The March on Washington D.C. was a grass roots event, a first of its kind national news event. Today The Takeaway takes a look back on the March on Washington.

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North Carolina Overhauls Election Process

Thursday, August 22, 2013

Last week North Carolina became the latest when the Governor signed an election law overhaul that includes a voter ID requirement, reduces early voting hours, and prohibits same-day registration. Michael Tomsic is a reporter for WFAE in Charlotte, North Carolina. He says what started as a simple voter ID bill took on a new life after the Supreme Court's ruling in June.

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After VRA Ruling, Florida Looks to Make Sweeping Changes Without Oversight

Wednesday, August 21, 2013

This week, we're looking at how the decision has already started to change voting laws across the United States. Today we look at Florida. Up until the Shelby County decision, five counties had to ask the Justice Department for permission before changing their voting laws. Gina Jordan, reporter for WLRN in Miami, says the state is now making sweeping changes without federal oversight.

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Texas & The Voting Rights Act

Tuesday, August 20, 2013

This week The Takeaway is taking you on a tour of states that have started to change their laws since the Supreme Court found parts of the Voting Rights Act unconstitutional. Texas wasted no time changing its laws in the wake of the Court's ruling. Kate McGee is a reporter at KUT in Austin. She says that the battle over redistricting in Texas began years before the Supreme Court's.

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The History of the Voting Rights Act: The Origins of the Preclearance Provision

Monday, August 19, 2013

Gary May is the author of "Bending Toward Justice: The Voting Rights Act and the Transformation of American Democracy." In his book, he explores the origins of the Voting Rights Act and answers the question: Why wasn't the preclearance test applied to all states and localities in the U.S. rather than the selective ones of the Voting Rights Act?

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Congress Investigates The Digital Currency Bitcoin

Thursday, August 15, 2013

This month, it seems, Bitcoin hit the big time. A federal judge declared that Bitcoins are in fact a recognized form of currency, and Bloomberg Terminal actually created a Bitcoin ticker. The Senate Committee on Homeland Security is beginning an investigation into the digital currency and how it can be regulated. Jeffrey Robinson, author of "The Laundrymen" joins us to discuss the future of regulating a currency based on anonymous exchanges of money.

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