Streams

Maurice Dolbier

Maurice Dolbier appears in the following:

Chet Huntley, Marc Connelly, and Abe Fortas

Monday, November 04, 1968

This episode is from the WNYC archives. It may contain language which is no longer politically or socially appropriate.

Opens with talk by Chet Huntley, NBC news anchorman and author of "The Generous Years: Remembrances of a Frontier Boyhood." He speaks about his boyhood in Montana. He delights the audience ...

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Louis Auchincloss, William Atwood, and Leo Rosten

Monday, January 16, 1967

This episode is from the WNYC archives. It may contain language which is no longer politically or socially appropriate.

Maurice Dolbier introduces attorney and author Louis Auchincloss, who discusses his the publication of his recent book of short stories, "Tales of Manhattan." Auchincloss discusses some of his works, including a ...

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Robert Crichton, Cornelia Otis Skinner, and Garson Kanin

Monday, January 16, 1967

This episode is from the WNYC archives. It may contain language which is no longer politically or socially appropriate.

Maurice Dolbier introduces the day's first speaker, Robert Crichton, who discusses what made him decide to write about the people in a small town in Italy in the book "The Secret ...

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Rowland Evans and Robert Novak, Rebecca West, and Sam Levenson

Monday, October 17, 1966

This episode is from the WNYC archives. It may contain language which is no longer politically or socially appropriate.

Rowland Evans and Robert Novak discuss their biography of President Lyndon Johnson.

Rebecca West, author of "The Birds Fall Down" speaks. She discusses the difficulties of claiming tax ...

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A. E. Hotchner, Marguerite Young, and Arthur Goldberg

Monday, April 18, 1966

This episode is from the WNYC archives. It may contain language which is no longer politically or socially appropriate.

Maurice Dolbier introduces A.E. Hotchner, the author of the biography "Papa Hemingway," a biography and account of his own fourteen year friendship with Ernest Hemingway. Hotchner recounts Hemingway's working style and ...

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Caroline Bird, Eric Berne, and Elie Abel

Thursday, April 14, 1966

This episode is from the WNYC archives. It may contain language which is no longer politically or socially appropriate.

Maurice Dolbier introduces Caroline Bird, author of "The Invisible Scar," a work about the Great Depression. She discusses the difficulties of gaining employment during the Depression - particularly, she notes the ...

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Rex Stout, Helen Hayes, and William O. Douglas

Monday, February 14, 1966

This episode is from the WNYC archives. It may contain language which is no longer politically or socially appropriate.

Maurice Dolbier introduces Rex Stout, author of the Nero Wolfe mysteries, the most recent of which was "The Doorbell Rang." The book's plot revolves around the actions of the FBI under ...

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David Schoenbrun, Bennett Cerf, and Barbara Tuchman

Sunday, January 16, 1966

This episode is from the WNYC archives. It may contain language which is no longer politically or socially appropriate.

Maurice Dolbier welcomes journalist Janet Flanner, Genet, to the podium to introduce David Schoenbrun, author of the biography "The Three Lives of Charles De Gaulle." Schienbrum pays tribute to the other ...

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Jules Feiffer, Alfred Kazin, Arthur Schlesinger

Monday, November 29, 1965

This episode is from the WNYC archives. It may contain language which is no longer politically or socially appropriate.

Maurice Dolbier introduces Village Voice cartoonist Jules Feiffer. Feiffer the discusses comic books from his youth, noting that any character who was a "bork worm" was invariably also a "Mad Scientist ...

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Richard J. Whalen, Sammy Davis Jr., and Theodore Sorensen

Monday, October 18, 1965

This episode is from the WNYC archives. It may contain language which is no longer politically or socially appropriate.

Richard J Whalen discusses civic duty and a sense of history in New York. He discusses all the rapid changes taking place in the city. Progress means that old things are ...

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Arthur Clarke, John D. Rockefeller III, and Henry A. Barnes

Monday, March 15, 1965

This episode is from the WNYC archives. It may contain language which is no longer politically or socially appropriate.

Program opens with Irita Van Doren introducing the Luncheon guests and overseeing the drawing of books. There is quite a bit of excitement among audience winners.


Maurice Dolbier then introduces ...

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William Redfield, Han Suyin, and Marquis Childs

Friday, January 01, 1965

The exact date of this episode is unknown. We've filled in the date above with a placeholder. What we actually have on record is: 1965-uu-uu.

This episode is from the WNYC archives. It may contain language which is no longer politically or socially appropriate.

The program opens with Maurice Dolbier's ...

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Gore Vidal, Louis Auchincloss, David Lilienthal

Monday, November 30, 1964

This episode is from the WNYC archives. It may contain language which is no longer politically or socially appropriate.

Maurice Dolbier mentions that three visitors from the USSR are in attendance. He then introduces Gore Vidal, author most recently of "Julian," a work of historical fiction written primarily in the ...

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Huntington Hartford, Maurice Druon, Edward Stone, James Britt Donovan, and Karl Menninger

Tuesday, April 14, 1964

This episode is from the WNYC archives. It may contain language which is no longer politically or socially appropriate.

Irita Van Doren announces that the first speaker must leave immediately after speaking and asks Maurice Dolbier to introduce Huntington Hartford. The format of this Books and Authors Luncheon is different, ...

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Frederick C. Barghoorn, Peter Blake, and Maurine Neuberger

Monday, February 10, 1964

This episode is from the WNYC archives. It may contain language which is no longer politically or socially appropriate.

Maurice Dolbier introduces Frederick Barghoorn, who gained international notoriety when he was imprisoned as a suspected spy in the Soviet Union. He was released under the pressure of President John F. ...

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Paul Hyde Bonner, Barbara Tuchman, and Walter Kerr

Tuesday, April 17, 1962

This episode is from the WNYC archives. It may contain language which is no longer politically or socially appropriate.

Maurice Dolbier introduces Paul Hyde Bonner, author of "Ambassador Extraordinary" as well as other novels related to international intrigue. He describes his own background, clarifying that he was not a career ...

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John W. Gardner, Cedric Hardwicke, and Barbara Ward

Monday, April 17, 1961

This episode is from the WNYC archives. It may contain language which is no longer politically or socially appropriate.

Irita Van Doren welcomes the audience and introduces some members present for the luncheon. There is a give away of autographed books.


Maurice Dolbier, acts as emcee. A portion of ...

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Ernest K. Gann, Mitchell Wilson, and Lewis Mumford

Tuesday, March 21, 1961

This episode is from the WNYC archives. It may contain language which is no longer politically or socially appropriate.

Van Doren identifies prominent members of the audience, then introduces Maurice Dolbier, who introduces Gann, who talks about his book, "Fate is the Hunter," and flying.

Dolbier introduces ...

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Perle Mesta, Jessamyn West, and Sir Pierson Dixon

Monday, April 11, 1960

This episode is from the WNYC archives. It may contain language which is no longer politically or socially appropriate.

Van Doren introduces important guests. Drawing for free books. Introduces Dolbier, who introduces Mesta.


Mesta, a well-known socialite and Woman of the Year for 1960, talks about her auto-biography, "Perle," and ...

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Mark van Doren, Clifton Fadiman, and Sir Charles Snow

Sunday, March 10, 1957

This episode is from the WNYC archives. It may contain language which is no longer politically or socially appropriate.

Irita van Doren introduces Maurice Dolbier, who introduces Mark van Doren, Irita's brother-in-law. Van Doren talks about his book "Don Quixote's Profession."


Dolbier introduces Fadiman, who does a mathematical magic ...

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