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Marcos Sueiro Bal

Marcos Sueiro Bal appears in the following:

Audiovisual archives in a digital world

Wednesday, December 18, 2013

WNYC

How is the digital world affecting the role of audiovisual archives? Last week the Metropolitan New York Library Council (METRO) and New York University's Moving Image and Preservation Program (MIAP) presented a workshop on preserving locally-produced digital audiovisual content, which tried to provide some ...

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The Honorable William F. Hagarty on the Benefits of Exercise, December 1931

Tuesday, December 17, 2013

WNYC

“May heaven speed the day when the length and breadth of our United States shall be peopled with men and women, and boys and girls, solely by those of this type: strong bodied, true hearted, big souled patriots, athletes all for the land they love and the God they worship.”

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The 1957 pandemic: Not the Flu We Knew

Friday, December 13, 2013

WNYC

Beginning in February 1957, a new influenza strain virus (known to virologists as H2N2) emerged in China.  Throughout April, May, and June, it spread steadily and rapidly across Asian and Middle Eastern countries.  There was one question in everyone’s minds: Would the new virus behave like the feared 1918 virus, which had caused tens of millions of deaths? Or would it behave like the ordinary influenza strains with which physicians were familiar? This November 1957 conference, organized by the New York Academy of Medicine and broadcast by WNYC, attempted to provide some answers.

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‘The World Has Suffered Many Losses through Time’: Environmental Conservation and The Passenger Pigeon, December 1931

Tuesday, December 10, 2013

WNYC

Most of us are familiar with the sad story of the passenger pigeon: the North American bird whose immense numbers (believed to have been up to forty percent of the wild bird population) and intensely social habits (being unable to thrive or breed successfully in small groups) prevented its recovery ...

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‘Depression or No Depression’: Bronx Hospital Needs Donations to Open, December 1931

Tuesday, December 03, 2013

WNYC

Imagine a newly constructed hospital with room for over 300 occupants, sitting idle and standing empty in a time of great need.

By the mid-1920s the Bronx Hospital, originally founded in 1911, had outgrown its original facility and began construction on a state-of-the art hospital at Fulton Avenue and 169th ...

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Moss-ly Mozart

Wednesday, November 27, 2013

WQXR

The WQXR Archives celebrates Month of Mozart with highlights from Lloyd Moss's WQXR show This is My Music.

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Twentieth Century Magic

Wednesday, November 27, 2013

On April 17, 1937 WQXR invited Evan Roberts, the Managing Director of the WPA Federal Theatre Project Radio Division, to talk about the wonders of radio and its potential to be entertaining, educational, amusing, exciting and appealing to the intellectual as well as the average person.

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Visualizing the Assassination of John Fitzgerald Kennedy

Tuesday, November 19, 2013

Listen to a chilling account, created only days later, of President Kennedy's assassination on November 22, 1963.

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Styli over substance

Wednesday, October 23, 2013

WNYC

The recently published National Recording Preservation Plan from the Library of Congress includes a recommendation to "encourage scientific and technical research leading to the development of new technologies to recover, reformat, and preserve audio recording media". Although at first sight this passage seems to refer to high-tech projects such as IRENE, there may be other, more modest ways to advance audio preservation technology. Here is an example.

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Leona Baumgartner, Elvis, and the Fight Against Polio

Sunday, August 18, 2013

WNYC

If it's good enough for Elvis, it's good enough for you and your child - On the birthday of the city's first female Health Commissioner, we honor Dr. Leona Baumgartner and the New York City publicity campaign for the polio vaccine.

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Blazing Maize: Mrs. Gannon's Tamale Pie, 1947

Tuesday, June 18, 2013

WNYC

Frances Foley Gannon was described as “a brisk little woman with a smiling Irish face.” Her advice was two-fold: in her daily five minutes on air, she told mothers what foods were in season and how to use them to plan family meals.

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Listen! The 1964 World's Fair in Sound

Wednesday, April 24, 2013

The 1964 World's Fair opened 50 years ago this week. In this archive joint, master builder Robert Moses, former Governor Charles Poletti and a cornucopia of others preview attractions expected at the fair. Among the featured attractions: The Pietà and a pavilion dedicated to the United Arab Republic. "We feel it's very, very important for the American people to learn more about Arab countries," Moses says.

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In Wartime '40s, America's First Taste of Rationing

Tuesday, April 09, 2013

WNYC

During World War II, rationing became not only accepted, but a symbol of patriotism for most Americans. Listen to Oscar Brand in this never-broadcast documentary on how the government —and WNYC— helped foster that sentiment.

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Bach to the '80s

Monday, March 25, 2013

WQXR

In the 1980s, WQXR's This is My Music featured at least 20 famous folks (from politicians to fashion models) who included a Bach piece in their all time top 4 musical pieces.

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Ed Koch in Jackson Heights, 1979

Friday, February 01, 2013

WNYC
In this episode of New York Considered, hear excerpts from New York City Mayor Ed Koch's community meeting in Jackson Heights. The Mayor speaks about issues concerning the city, with particular emphasis on Queens: immigration, housing, street safety, transportation.

New York Considered was a public affairs series produced by Marty Goldensohn and Peter Freyberg.
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Before Bono: Danny Kaye, First UN Ambassador, on his 1954 East Asia trip

Wednesday, January 09, 2013

In 1954, entertainment superstar Danny Kaye became UNICEF's first Ambassador at Large, a post he held until his death in 1987. This is Mr Kaye's personal recounting of his first East Asian tour visiting many of the world's impoverished children.

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Patricia Marx interviews Danny Kaye, 1968

Wednesday, January 09, 2013

WNYC

Patricia Marx interviews Danny Kaye about humor, accents, and music.

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How Sound is the President's Budget?

Friday, December 28, 2012

WNYC

In this episode from Northwestern University Reviewing Stand, a panel of experts discusses Dwight Eisenhower's 1956 budget message. Were those different times? Former director of the Congressional Budget Office Rudolph Penner compares the budget struggles of yesteryear with today's.

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Clean Water and Fiery Furnaces: The Health of New York, 1947

Thursday, December 27, 2012

WNYC

In this 1948 New Year’s Day address, NYC Health Commissioner Harry Mustard radiates post-war optimism and faith in the future.   He proudly recounts the accomplishments of the previous year in infant and maternal health, food and water safety and venereal disease treatment.  He also candidly discusses the resource shortages of the Health Department, as well as the need to do more in the areas of environmental health (smoke from old furnaces was a key issue of the time), tuberculosis, chronic disease and mental hygiene.   In short, he sounds like he is giving a report from NYC’s current model for action, “Take Care, New York”.

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Congressman Ed Koch on rent control reform, 1967

Thursday, December 27, 2012

WNYC

Congressman Edward I. Koch speaks on a telephone interview about rent control, including an upcoming rally.

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