Streams

Marcos Sueiro Bal

Marcos Sueiro Bal is the Senior Archivist at New York Public Radio.

Marcos is Co-Chair of the Technical Committee at the Association of Recorded Sound Collections, and was part of the Collection Management Task Force that drafted the Library of Congress National Recording Preservation Plan in 2012. In 2011 he co-translated the definitive text on audio preservation, Guidelines for the Production and Preservation of Digital Audio Objects. He is a member of the Standards Committee of the Audio Engineering Society and of the Independent Media Arts Preservation board. He has mastered and restored 2011’s Jacqueline Kennedy: Historic Conversations on Life with John F. Kennedy, and he was nominated for a Grammy for his work on 2008’s Polk Miller and His Old South Quartette. He has worked at the Alan Lomax Archives, Columbia University Libraries (where he developed AVDb, a preservation prioritization tool), Masterdisk mastering studios, and Emory University. He teaches Audio Preservation at Long Island University's Palmer School of Library Science.

Marcos Sueiro Bal appears in the following:

Are Comics Bad for Children?

Saturday, October 11, 2014

WNYC
In the 1940s and '50s comics were considered pernicious by many. This Brooklyn mom spoke her moderate mind on WNYC.
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Lyndon Johnson reacts to the Walter Jenkins incident, 1964

Tuesday, October 07, 2014

50 years ago, presidential aide Walter Jenkins was arrested for having sex with a man in a YMCA bathroom, just weeks before the 1964 presidential election. Hear a clip of LBJ's reaction.
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Siri Meets Her Grandpa

Friday, October 03, 2014

WNYC
Tomorrow is Siri's birthday, and to test her skills, we played her a 1962 recording of an IBM 704 computer singing "Daisy Bell." Will Siri recognize her own voice-sythesized forebears?
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The Origins of the "Star Spangled Banner," in Six Minutes

Friday, September 26, 2014

WNYC
The Star Spangled Banner turns 200 this month. To commemorate, the inimitable Oscar Brand explains in words and music its origins from a sheep-shearing song to the national anthem.
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A Musical Tribute to Edgar Varèse, April 17, 1981

Tuesday, September 09, 2014

How a Frank Zappa-hosted concert of music by Varèse was resurrected
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Frank Zappa Referees Tribute to Edgard Varèse

Tuesday, September 09, 2014

Q2 Music is thrilled to present an archival recording of the famous Frank Zappa-hosted concert of the music of Edgard Varèse, recorded April 17, 1981 at the now-defunct Palladium in NYC.

Comments [4]

Edwin Fancher: Change and Continuity in Greenwich Village

Friday, September 05, 2014

WNYC
Homosexuality. Mixed-race couples. Narcotics on MacDougal Street. This archived conversation from a WNYC broadcast gives an incredible sense of what's changed--and what hasn't.
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Listen to what Nelson Rockefeller said about Belgium in 1965

Tuesday, July 01, 2014

WNYC

Back in happier, non-World-Cup-matches-between-Belgium-and-USA times, this is what the New York state governor said. Listen to the whole, happy broadcast here.

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Two Moving Statements about the Civil Rights Workers Killed 50 years Ago Today

Saturday, June 21, 2014

Two Moving Statements about the Civil Rights Workers Killed 50 years Ago Today
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A Queens senator proposes legalizing drugs... in 1965

Thursday, June 19, 2014

A Queens senator proposes legalizing drugs... in 1965
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Kurt Vonnegut: "Fates Worse Than Death"

Wednesday, June 11, 2014

His humorous and edgy 1982 “sermon” took on the question of whether hydrogen bombs would deliver us from more terrifying circumstances. A literary classic, the full audio recording is now available for the first time.

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Beautiful and Disturbing 'Peter and the Wolf' Album Covers

Friday, May 23, 2014

The most popular children's piece ever spawned some pretty wild art — and many surprising celebrity cameos. Take a look and tell us your favorites.
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Comments [24]

A Very Weird Song About Adolf Hitler

Wednesday, May 07, 2014

Decades before Mel Brooks made it okay to sing about Hitler, an obscure singer recorded this defiant song about the Fuhrer. Just a two weeks later, in September 1940, the Germans bombarded London.

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50 Years Ago, Breakfast Changed Forever

Monday, April 28, 2014

WNYC

It arrived at the New York World's Fair 50 years ago, and breakfast was never the same. To celebrate such a sweet event, listen to this report on the 1958 Brussels World's Fair —"the first World's Fair of the Atomic Age!!"


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Calypso on WNYC

Friday, April 25, 2014

WNYC
Did you know WNYC was one of the first U.S. broadcasters of calypso music? Neither did we, until we dug up this clip from 1941 and started dancing.
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Paul Fussell: The Poetry of Three Wars: World War I, World War II and Vietnam

Wednesday, April 02, 2014

The late Paul Fussell (1924-2012) was a noted cultural and literary historian, who taught at Rutgers and the University of Pennsylvania. He wrote about such diverse subjects as Samuel Johnson, travel, and the American class system. His numerous books include Poetic Meter and Poetic Form, The Great War and Modern Memory (for which he won a National Book Award), and The American Infantry in Northwestern Europe, 1944-45. Fussell was a veteran of World War II, fighting in Europe, where he was wounded and decorated with a Bronze Star and two Purple Hearts.

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Hello Future, Can You Hear Me?

Friday, March 21, 2014

Last week we presented an allegory for retrieving audio, where we compared it to listening to a distant radio station. Of course, that is only half of what audio archivists do: the other half is to try to extend the reach of that signal into the future.

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Hello Past, I Can Hear You!

Friday, March 14, 2014

WNYC

Picture yourself on a weekend retreat in a rented cabin in the woods, not far from your home. Although you love the isolation (no wi-fi, no TV), you would like to listen to your favorite radio show on Saturday afternoon¹. After looking around, you find a cheap clock radio in the bedroom and, at the appointed time, you fiddle with the (maddeningly small) tuner wheel, tune the (analog) dial, and hope that your favorite station's signal reaches your receiver's dinky little antenna.

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A Song For the Melting Snow

Friday, March 07, 2014

WNYC

Celebrate the retreat of winter with an extraordinary performance of The Waters of March. It's not just a song about Spring, it's a song about "the rebirth of the human spirit."

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Say it Loud: Black, Immigrant & Proud

Monday, February 17, 2014

In 1951, jazz superstar Hazel Scott boldly spoke against Jim Crow. At least a decade before Martin Luther King's "I Have a Dream" speech, the former "Darling of Café Society" talked about her own hopes of a future with "all racial prejudice eliminated."

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