Streams

Maggie Penman

Intern, The Takeaway

Maggie Penman appears in the following:

Your Fiscal Cliff Questions, Answered

Wednesday, November 28, 2012

What is the difference between the fiscal cliff and the threat of the government shut-down, last year? What are the chances that Congress will do nothing more than change the January 1, 2013 deadline? What will the fiscal cliff mean for my federal student loans? Takeaway listeners wrote in with these and other questions about the fiscal cliff. Washington correspondent Todd Zwillich is here with the answers. 

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The Hobbit Premiers In New Zealand, Middle Earth Goes Nuts

Wednesday, November 28, 2012

Last night, the long awaited Peter Jackson directed film “The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey,” premiered in New Zealand, bringing to a climax a long, sometimes strange relationship between a nation, an industry and millions of rabid fans. Colin Peacock, host of Mediawatch on Radio New Zealand, has been closely following the ups and downs of the Hobbit movie, from Elvin enthusiasm to altered labor laws.

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Why Obama Should Go Over the Fiscal Cliff

Tuesday, November 20, 2012

Some Republicans, including columnist Marc Thiessen, say their only negotiating tactic is to let the United States go over the fiscal cliff. But New Yorker staff writer John Cassidy says it’s Obama who would benefit from the January 1st package of tax hikes and spending cuts.

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Palestinian-Americans Experience Unrest in their Homes from Afar

Monday, November 19, 2012

The death toll from fighting between Israel and Hamas continues to rise. According to the Palestinian Health Ministry and our partner The New York Times, the death toll in Palestine death toll had reached 91 as of Monday. Three Israelis have been killed since the beginning of the conflict. Lena Ibrahim is a first generation Palestinian-American and activist.

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Ken Burns on the Generation that Survived The Dust Bowl

Friday, November 16, 2012

In his latest film, "The Dust Bowl," director Ken Burns shares the stories of those who survived one of the worst man-made environmental disasters in American history and considers whether the crisis could happen again, in a region heavily dependent on the waters of the Ogallala Aquifer which have been rapidly depleted.

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Meet China's New Leadership

Friday, November 16, 2012

The Chinese Community Party ushered in its new leadership on Wednesday, after the party's 18th National Congress. Xi Jinping has taken over for Hu Jiantao. Elizabeth Economy, senior fellow and director for Asia Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations, discusses China's new leadership.

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Does the Final Twilight Movie Go Out with a Bang or a Fizzle?

Friday, November 16, 2012

The final installment of the Twilight series releases today and is expected to be the highest grossing movie of 2012. The film is directed by Bill Condon, the director behind "Dream Girls," "Kinsey," and "Gods and Monsters." To review "Twilight: Breaking Dawn-Part 2" is the movie date team, Kristen Meinzer and Rafer Guzman. 

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Air Raid Sirens Sound in Tel Aviv

Friday, November 16, 2012

A crisis is unfolding in the Middle East, and as expected Israel mounted a huge assault overnight and Gaza militants continued to launch rockets. A key development: the sound of air-raid sirens and explosions heard in Tel Aviv. Natan Sachs, who researches Israeli foreign and domestic policy at the Brookings Institute in D.C., explains what's going on.

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Adam Gopnik on the Meaning of Food

Friday, November 16, 2012

With Thanksgiving just around the corner, food is on most of our minds. But for Adam Gopnik, author and staff writer for The New Yorker, this is nothing out of the ordinary. In his most recent book, The Table Comes First, Gopnik explores the meaning of food — in culture, in family, and in society.

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BP Fined $4.5 Billion Over 2010 Spill, the Largest Settlement in U.S. History

Thursday, November 15, 2012

Oil giant British Petroleum has agreed to pay a record fine of $4.5 billion to settle criminal charges related to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon disaster. It's the largest criminal penalty in U.S. history. Bloomberg News reporter Brian Swint is following the story in London.

"This should cover criminal charges against ...

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Who Is Susan Rice?

Thursday, November 15, 2012

The current U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations, Susan Rice, has been the target of Republicans because of her comments following the attack on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi which left four Americans dead, including Ambassador Chris Stevens. Jendayi Frazer is a longtime friend of Susan Rice, defends the person behind the scrutiny.

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Checking in After Hurricane Sandy

Thursday, November 15, 2012

Hurricane Sandy affected millions of people on the East Coast, hitting New York and New Jersey especially hard. The storm hit home for us here at The Takeaway. Our senior producer, Jen Poyant, lives in Arverne, Queens near the Rockaways, one of the hardest hit parts of New York City.

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Tensions Escalate after Israeli Air Strikes Kill Hamas Military Leader

Thursday, November 15, 2012

On Wednesday, in response to rocket attacks from Hamas-controlled Gaza Strip, Israel launched a series of air strikes that killed Hamas military leader Ahmed al-Jabari, and, according to health officials in Gaza, nine others. Isabel Kershner, reporter for Takeaway partner The New York Times, reports from the Israel-Gaza border. Aaron David Miller, distinguished scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, discusses the current conflict and Israel's position in the evolving Middle East.

“The wanton aggression against Gaza proves that Israel has yet to realize that Egypt has changed and that the Egyptian people who revolted against oppression will not accept assaulting Gaza.”

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Despite Resigning, Petraeus Will Testify on Benghazi

Thursday, November 15, 2012

Former CIA Director David Petraeus resigned on Friday, hoping to get in front of the scandal involving Paula Broadwell before it thrust him any further into the spotlight. But Congress has other ideas. Tim Weiner has covered the CIA for The New York Times and is the author of, "Legacy of Ashes: The History of the CIA."

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Miami Marlins Deal Away Their Star Players

Wednesday, November 14, 2012

Just a year after receiving an enormous amount of public funding to build a new stadium in Little Cuba, and spending lavishly on MLB free agents such as Jose Reyes, the Marlins completed a trade with the Blue Jays yesterday that sent any remaining members of the team making big salaries away to Toronto, in exchange for mediocre players and cheap deals. Needless to say, their fans aren't so pleased.

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David Petraeus and the Military's Culture of Celebrity

Wednesday, November 14, 2012

In all the news surrounding General David Petraeus’s resignation, there’s a central question about military culture itself. As Petraeus implemented his counter-insurgency strategy in Iraq, and then Afghanistan, he became a celebrity, an old-school military hero who seemed to have all the answers to America's messy conflicts abroad. Wired Magazine's Spencer Ackerman describes this as the 'Cult of David Petraeus.'

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American Energy in the Age of the Superstorm

Wednesday, November 14, 2012

If recent storms spark a renewed interest in combatting climate change, we could see a resurgence of the national gas industry. Jeffrey Leonard, the CEO of the Global Environment Fund, a growth capital-oriented investment firm, explains.

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'The Patriarch': The Complicated Legacy of Joseph P. Kennedy

Wednesday, November 14, 2012

Joseph P. Kennedy, the powerful patriarch of the Kennedy dynasty, died in 1969, but the legacy he left behind has continued to fascinate, and puzzle, historians as well as his own descendants. David Nasaw cuts through the myth surrounding the elder statesman in his new biography, "The Patriarch: The Remarkable Life and Turbulent Times of Joseph P. Kennedy."

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Military Marriages: Does a Higher Set of Standards Apply?

Wednesday, November 14, 2012

As General David Petreaus’s marital infidelity comes to light and his storied career comes to an end, questions have arisen about his marriage, his life in the military, and whether members of the military are — or should be — held to a higher standard than the rest of us.

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What Does Legal Marijuana Mean for Washington and Colorado?

Tuesday, November 13, 2012

The legalization of recreational marijuana use in Washington and Colorado has raised a number of big questions about the social, legal, and economic implications. What are people saying on the ground in these states? And how has this change already altered attitudes toward marijuana? Dominic Holden a newsweekly editor in Seattle, and Bonnie Dahl, a head ship owner, explain.

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