Streams

Lynn Sherr

Correspondent for PBS television

Lynn Sherr appears in the following:

Soon 714 million Indians head to the polls

Wednesday, April 15, 2009

Soon the entire subcontinent of India will have a job. They must go to their nearest polling place and elect a new government. No one is making predictions on this election other than to forecast that whatever unwieldy coalition government is elected, they have a tough road ahead. The global economic crisis has not failed to hit India, slowing growth for the first time in years. Despite the influx of three stimulus plans, which dramatically increased the deficit, the nation is still struggling, and none more than the poorest. Here with an election guide is Somini Sengupta, the South Asia bureau chief for the New York Times.

For more, read Somini Sengupta's article, As Elections Near, Tightrope Awaits in India, in today's New York Times.

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The Color of Money: Marketing financial services in communities of color

Wednesday, April 15, 2009

Today is the Part Two of The Takeaway’s series “The Color of Money.” We’re exploring how the financial crisis is affecting people of color in the United States, perhaps differently than it affects their white peers. Today we are taking a close look at how financial services are marketed by black Americans to black Americans. For example, “rush cards" — no-credit-check, pre-paid credit cards with $200 credit limits and $50 a year in fees. We’re joined by Boyce Watkins, professor of finance at Syracuse University and founder of YourBlackWorld, to discuss access to credit, the failings of financial institutions, and the changing American Dream.

Listen to Part One of The Takeaway's Color of Money series, Debtors' Prison: It lives in the 21st Century.

Here is the ad for Russell Simmons' "Rush Card":



And here is a conversation about that Rush Card from the Young Guns Now (some harsh language):

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Staying mentally steady in tough economic times

Wednesday, April 15, 2009

“Times are tough.” “We are beginning to see glimmers of hope.” Those were two of the statements President Obama made in his speech on the economy yesterday. It seems like a mixed message. What’s the best way to cope emotionally and stay on an even keel in turbulent times? Annie McKee, founder of the global consulting firm Teleos Leadership Institute, advises business leaders on how to use emotional intelligence to be effective. She joins The Takeaway to tell how regular people can use those same skills to ride the economic waves now.

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The sweet low down on fake sugar

Wednesday, April 15, 2009

Are you singing about Splenda? Or nuts for Nutrisweet? Ecstastic for Equal? Slaphappy for Sweet 'N Low? Seems like everyone has an opinion on coffee shop sweeteners. Are you ready to add one more sweetener to your non-sugar repertoire? Welcome Truvia, a stevia-based sugar substitute that was approved by the FDA in December. With sugar substitutes raking in over $1.2 billion a year, you can expect new competitors in the market, but are they any good? Why are the fans so brand loyal? And whatever happened to plain old sugar? The New York Times food writer Kim Severson joins us in an exploration of the fierce competition for our tastebuds.

"People are wanting shorter supply chains, they want healthier food, so sugar — pure cane sugar — sort of has this aura about it. This sort of green aura."
—New York Times food writer Kim Severson on choices in sweeteners


For more, read Kim Severson's article, Showdown at the Coffee Shop, in today's New York Times.

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Dan Ariely on why we pay taxes (and why we sometimes don't)

Wednesday, April 15, 2009

It's Tax Day! In these challenging economic times, and in the wake of massive bank bailouts and several of Obama's cabinet nominees who took tax missteps, people may be fishing for an excuse not to pay all of their taxes. For a primer on what motivates us to cheat—and what keeps us honest—we are joined by behavioral economist Dan Ariely. He is the James B. Duke Professor of Behavioral Economics at Duke University and author of Predictably Irrational.
"The majority of the financial burden of cheating doesn't come from those individuals who don't pay at all, it comes from lots of people who are just shaving their taxes just by a little bit."
—Duke University Professor Dan Ariely on people cheating on taxes

For more Tax Day drama, check out our Producer's Note on the Battle of the Tax Day Tea Parties.

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Your brain on climate change: Why we fight the impulse to go green

Wednesday, April 15, 2009

The world is now spending billions of dollars investigating the causes of climate change. Scientists are quickly putting together physical and biological experiments and projects, hoping for solutions and models that will show us how to slow warming and save the planet. But there's another body of work underway that's focused on the human brain. This research argues that climate change policy and solutions for global warming won't be worth much until we know how to influence the individual decisions that cause global warming. To help us figure out why it is so hard to get our brains to choose green options we are joined by Jon Gertner, a contributing writer for the New York Times Magazine. His article on this will be available in the Times Magazine on Sunday.

Maybe this is a case for Captain Planet:

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Beating the heat with new sunburn technology

Wednesday, April 15, 2009

Researchers in Glasgow have developed an early warning sunburn indicator. A thin paper strip or sticker, filled with "intelligent ink," will turn pink after too much exposure to ultra-violet light. The device is easy to use, too: Before heading to the beach, strap on the bracelet or sticker and when you see it turn pink, it is time to put on a shirt or head indoors. The strips are inexpensive enough for frequent use and researchers are hoping to test the prototype this summer. We're learning more about this shiny new development with Andrew Mills, professor at Strathclyde University, who helped to create these sunburn wristbands.

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Race, drugs and the changing face of the prison population

Wednesday, April 15, 2009

A new report from The Sentencing Project reveals a changing demographic of prisoners who are incarcerated for drug charges. The report shows that for the first time in 25 years, since the start of the so-called War on Drugs, incarceration rates for black men has dropped. The report shows that over a six-year period, the rate of black men in jail on drug-related charges dropped 21% while the imprisonment for white men spiked by 42%. Is this racial disparity a sign of the changing prison demographic? To guide us through what these numbers mean, The Takeaway is joined by David Fathi, director of Human Rights Watch in the U.S.

Read The Sentencing Project's report, The Changing Racial Dynamics of the War on Drugs.

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Ambassadors of Freedom: Do Cuban-Americans want the job?

Wednesday, April 15, 2009

President Barack Obama has made clear that he views Cuban Americans as “Ambassadors of Democracy” who can bring a message to Cuba when they visit their families there. But what do Cuban-Americans think? Are they excited at this new patriotic title bestowed on them? Or glad to be able to trace their roots back to the island nation? Are they unwilling to return to Cuba while the Castros are still in power? Or are they just happy to have another beach to visit? This morning we are listening to the response from younger Cuban-Americans who were born here in the U.S. and never personally knew life under Castro or in Cuba. The Takeaway talks to Danny Mendoza, a filmmaker and student at New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts.

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U.S. Envoy George Mitchell heads to Israel in new bid for peace

Wednesday, April 15, 2009

U.S. Special Envoy to the Middle East George Mitchell arrives in Israel today as part of his two-week tour of the Middle East and North Africa. Against the backdrop of Israel's three week offensive in Gaza to root out Hamas militants, Mitchell has announced he is pushing a two-state solution to the Middle East conflict and during his trip he has been enlisting broad Arab support for his plan. But how important is it to have Arabic support for plans for peace in Israel? To help us answer that question, we turn to Rosemary Hollis. For ten years, Ms. Hollis was the head of the Middle East program at Chatham House—a leading international affairs think tank. She is now Director of the Olive Tree Programme at London's City Universtiy.
"The rivalry between them is so bitter that they are jeopardizing the future of the Palestinian people and the future of any kind of peace relations in the name of trying to defeat one another."
—Rosemary Hollis of the Olive Tree Program on the Middle East conflict

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Is aid to Africa dead?

Friday, March 27, 2009

In the past fifty years, wealthy nations including the U.S. have given $1 trillion in aid to the continent of Africa. And yet, many African countries remain mired in poverty. So is it time to rethink aid to Africa? The Takeaway talks to Dambisa Moyo an economist and author of the book Dead Aid: Why Aid is not Working and How there is a Better Way for Africa. We are also joined by Lynn Sherr, journalist and Africa correspondent for PBS's World Focus.

For more from Dambisa Moyo, watch the clip of her discussing African aid below.

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This woman will be great: Lynn Sherr on Ellen Johnson Sirleaf

Friday, March 27, 2009

In the last five years, Liberia has made the transition from Charles Taylor, a warlord accused of hate crimes, to Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, the first woman democratically elected to lead an African nation. It's a change that has made Liberia a focal point for the advancement of women in Africa and worldwide. Ellen Johnson Sirleaf is now coming to the U.S, and releasing a book about her life, This Child Will Be Great. She's also just been interviewed by Lynn Sherr, special correspondent for World Focus on PBS.

"This is a country that is war-torn. There are bullet holes everywhere. It's hot. It's humid. It's steamy. But I have to tell you it is inspiring because they are really trying to come back."
—Lynn Sherr, special correspondent for World Focus on PBS, on Liberian president Ellen Johnson Sirleaf

For more, head to worldfocus.org

Here is a 2007 tribute to President Sirleaf created when she was honored at the Africare Bishop Walker Dinner and received the 2007 Bishop John T. Walker Distinguished Humanitarian Award.

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Peter Jennings: A Reporter’s Life

Friday, November 09, 2007

Peter Jennings was hired by ABC to anchor the evening news when he was just 26 years old. His widow Kayce Freed Jennings and former colleague Lynn Sherr have co-edited a new book called Peter Jennings: A Reporter’s Life.

Event:
Kayce Freed Jennings and Lynn Sherr will be taking ...

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