Streams

Lydia Zuraw

Lydia Zuraw appears in the following:

Why Freezing Didn't Keep Sushi Tuna Safe From Salmonella

Wednesday, September 02, 2015

A recent outbreak of Salmonella in frozen tuna might have sushi lovers wondering if it's safe to eat that raw fish.

The outbreak in question began in California in March. All told, it sickened 65 people in 11 states. There were 35 cases in California, with another 18 ...

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Fake Food George Washington Could've Sunk His Fake Teeth Into

Sunday, February 15, 2015

If you want to see what George Washington might have munched on, then Sandy Levins is your gal. All the foods she whips up look scrumptious, but if you sneak a bite, you'll get a mouthful of plaster or clay.

Levins is one of a handful of frequently overlooked artisans ...

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Poets Give Voice To The Toll Of Type 2 Diabetes

Saturday, September 13, 2014

It may not seem like spoken-word poetry and diabetes have a lot to do with one another, but public health educators in California are using the art form to engage young people about the disease.

"Between growing up in Colón, Panama and a tour in the U.S. army, Grandpa is ...

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The French Learned To Make Wine From Italians 2,400 Years Ago

Tuesday, June 04, 2013

The French weren't the first to make wine? Mon dieu! But as anyone who has sipped a Bordeaux, Champagne or Burgundy can tell you, the French got pretty good at it once they learned how. And thanks to some molecular archaeology, researchers can now confirm they picked up these skills ...

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Picnicking Through The Ages

Sunday, May 26, 2013

Whether a shepherd, an explorer, a hunter or a fairgoer, people have been eating outside since the beginning of time.

"The dictionaries confirm the word 'picnic' first surfaced in the 18th century, so we were picnicking before we had the term," says research librarian and food historian Lynne Olver, who ...

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How Genomics Solved The Mystery Of Ireland's Great Famine

Wednesday, May 22, 2013

An international group of plant pathologists has solved a historical mystery behind Ireland's Great Famine.

Sure, scientists have known for a while that a funguslike organism called Phytophthora infestans was responsible for the potato blight that plagued Ireland starting in the 1840s. But there are many different strains of ...

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'Picture Cook': Drawings Are The Key Ingredients In These Recipes

Friday, May 17, 2013

Back in 2009, Katie Shelly was craving an eggplant Parmesan. Small problem: She'd never made it before. But she remembered that a college roommate used to make it, so she called her up and asked for the recipe.

The friend told her she needed to start with three bowls ...

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Breast Cancer, Risk And Women's Imperfect Choices

Wednesday, May 15, 2013

Just about anything that Angelina Jolie does is pretty much guaranteed to make news. But her announcement that she had decided on a preventive double mastectomy to reduce her unusually high risk of cancer sparked an outpouring of passionate comment on breast cancer prevention and treatment.

Copyright 2013 NPR. ...

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Chef Edward Lee Adds Korean Spice To Southern Comfort Food

Friday, May 03, 2013

Korean and Southern food may not seem like a natural pair. But now it's one more example of traditions emulsifying in the great American melting pot. Korean-American chef Edward Lee makes that case with his new cookbook Smoke and Pickles: Recipes and Stories From a New Southern Kitchen.

Fusion ...

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If TV's Your Cup Of Tea, Try A Character-Infused Blend

Monday, April 29, 2013

Apparently, fan fiction and fan art aren't the only options for expressing your love of Sherlock, Doctor Who and The Hunger Games. There's also tea.

If you visit the online tea store of Adagio Teas, you'll find a collection of "Fandom Blends." They're the teas that customers have mixed ...

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How Coffee Influenced The Course Of History

Wednesday, April 24, 2013

Once people figured out how to roast the seeds of the Coffea plant in the 1400s, coffee took over the world. In doing so, it fueled creativity, revolutions, new business ventures, lit...

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From Vine To Pen: When Your Drink Is In The Ink

Thursday, April 18, 2013

Sure, we all know alcohol has fueled plenty a writing session. William Faulkner — who once said, "civilization begins with distillation" — was known to have kept a bottle by his side while he typed away throughout his writing career.

But for centuries, writers relied on alcohol to keep ...

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Junior League Cookbooks: Crowdsourced Recipes, Old-School Style

Sunday, April 14, 2013

The Masters Tournament — you think golf, we think food.

Well, now we think food because this week we were tipped off to a cookbook created for the storied tournament in Augusta, Ga.

The Junior League of Augusta, a women's volunteer and civic organization, published Tea-Time at the ...

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As Palliative Care Need Grows, Specialists Are Scarce

Friday, April 05, 2013

Baby boomers have never needed more care to ease their pain and suffering. But there simply aren't enough specialists to get the job done.

There's a shortfall of as many as 18,000 physicians focused on palliative care and hospice care. Right now, there are 5,150 hospice programs and 1,635 ...

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Why Illinois Is Roaring Mad About Lion Meat

Wednesday, March 27, 2013

When we heard a few weeks ago that Illinois was considering banning lion meat, our first thought was, who's eating lion meat? And why Illinois?

Turns out, lion meat has been gaining traction among adventurous foodies who argue that the meat can be an ethical alternative to factory-farmed animals — ...

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Wine Revolution: As Drinkers And Growers, U.S. Declares Independence

Saturday, March 16, 2013

A curious shift has happened in global wine-drinking trends: Americans have overtaken the French and Italians, Europe's traditional lovers of the fruits of the vine, as the world's top wine market.

And it's not just wine drinking that's taken off stateside: U.S. wine production is also on the rise.

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Hardening Of Human Arteries Turns Out To Be A Very Old Story

Monday, March 11, 2013

Going "paleo" may not be the answer to heart disease, after all.

A few years ago, a team of researchers challenged our understanding of heart disease as a modern affliction. They found evidence of hardened arteries in the CT scans of ancient Egyptian mummies.

It was a little surprising ...

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Edible Bonsai: East Meets West On These Cookie Canvases

Monday, March 11, 2013

Risa Hirai is a Japanese artist who paints detailed images of bonsai trees and Japanese meals. But instead of using paint on a canvas, she works with icing on a cookie.

The 23-year-old is a senior at Tama Art University in Tokyo whose mouthwatering works will be exhibited at ...

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Career Suicide Or Lifesaver? Why A Professional Foodie Went Vegetarian

Saturday, March 09, 2013

It takes an adventurous palate to be a food journalist, who must sample and judge from a wide world of cuisines. So it's understandable why some chefs and foodies might be suspicious of a food editor who decides to cut himself off from a broad swath of eating possibilities by ...

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The Microwave Miracle Of Cooking In Mugs

Monday, February 25, 2013

Lunchtime is around the corner, and your tummy is rumbling. If you've got a microwave, a mug and a few basic ingredients, you can cook up a meal right in the office.

Morning Edition's David Greene recently started microwaving scrambled eggs in a mug for those early mornings on hosting ...

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