Streams

Louisa Lim

National Public Radio Shanghai correspondent

Louisa Lim appears in the following:

June 4: The Day That Defines, And Still Haunts China

Tuesday, June 03, 2014

Suppressing its own people with tanks and guns 25 years ago was a pivotal act of modern China. Beijing hoped economic prosperity would make people forget. But the legacy of Tiananmen remains potent.

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For One Soldier At Tiananmen, A Day 'Never Forgotten'

Monday, June 02, 2014

Chen Guang is now an artist, and since early May, he has been held in police detention after staging a performance that was a comment on attempts to expunge the Tiananmen Square massacre from history.

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For Many Of China's Youth, June 4 May As Well Be Just Another Day

Sunday, June 01, 2014

Students were the driving force behind the 1989 pro-democracy protests in Beijing. China's youth now have other worries, the events of 25 years ago forgotten and buried by time and the government.

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25 Years On, Mothers Of Tiananmen Square Dead Seek Answers

Tuesday, May 20, 2014

A bullet to the head killed Zhang Xianling's son near Tiananmen Square on June 4, 1989. Since then, she has led a group demanding the truth and accountability for those deaths.

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After 25 Years Of Amnesia, Remembering A Forgotten Tiananmen

Tuesday, April 15, 2014

The bloody 1989 crackdown in Beijing changed China, NPR's Louisa Lim explains in a new book. She also chronicles the brutal repression that took place in another city — and remained hidden until now.

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For China's Youth, A Life Of 'Darkness Outside The Night'

Saturday, July 20, 2013

In his haunting new graphic novel, cartoonist Xie Peng, 36, captures a psychological journey into the world of young Chinese. He worked for six years on the book, which renders a landscape of competition, anxiety and stress, and where everything, including dignity, is a commodity.

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Belly Dancing For The Dead: A Day With China's Top Mourner

Wednesday, June 26, 2013

Banned during the Cultural Revolution, China's ancient funeral practices are re-emerging — but with new twists. One of China's most famous professional mourners creates modern funerals with Chinese characteristics — burning paper money, wailing and prostrating, karaoke eulogies and strobe lights.

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Calls For Justice For Tiananmen Met With Silence

Monday, June 03, 2013

Twenty-four years after the crackdown on protesters in Beijing, parents of those killed are still prevented from mourning publicly. However, the rise of the Internet and social media has given democracy activists new tools.

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Targets Of Disgraced Bo Xilai Still Languish In Jail

Monday, May 27, 2013

The once high-flying Chinese politician Bo Xilai was detained for corruption and abuse of power 14 months ago. While still party boss in Chongqing, Bo launched his own crackdown on corruption, which is now under scrutiny. But even as troubling legal questions arise, many of the people nabbed remain imprisoned.

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China's Artist Provocateur Explores New Medium: Heavy Metal

Wednesday, May 22, 2013

In 2011, police detained Ai Weiwei for 81 days. Now, he's released a song that's turned the experience into a heavy metal protest song, along with a dystopian nightmare video. The lyrics are explicit and angry. Ai says his music is for the many political prisoners who remain jailed.

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Children Of China's Wealthy Learn Expensive Lessons

Monday, May 20, 2013

Some super-rich Chinese are sending their kids to weekend classes in order to learn how to deal with money. The lessons include things like a charity sale designed to teach the children compassion, sharing and the value of money.

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After The Quake In China: A Survivor's Story

Monday, May 13, 2013

Natural disasters make the headlines. But we rarely hear how the survivors are doing years later. Here's the story of Zhang Ming, who suffered devastating losses in the 2008 earthquake in China's Sichuan province.

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Five Years After A Quake, Chinese Cite Shoddy Reconstruction

Monday, May 13, 2013

A massive 2008 temblor in Sichuan province killed some 90,000 Chinese and pointed to the poor construction practices in China. The rebuilding effort was supposed to showcase modern China. But today, many survivors are angry over what they say is official corruption, ranging from poor construction and unpaid workers to bribes and improper compensation for seized land.

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Chinese Police Clamp Down On Protesters After Worker's Death

Thursday, May 09, 2013

Hundreds of police were deployed in southern Beijing Wednesday to quell a large protest after a migrant worker fell to her death at a clothing mall. Police say it was suicide, but there are reports the woman was gang-raped by security guards. Her family is asking for a proper investigation.

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To Silence Discontent, Chinese Officials Alter Workweek

Saturday, May 04, 2013

After local authorities got word of a planned environmental protest in the southwestern city of Chengdu, they decided to make Saturday a workday. Security personnel, meanwhile, converged on the city center in a display of force.

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Chinese Dreams: Freedom, Democracy And Clean Air

Monday, April 29, 2013

Chinese leaders and the state-run media keep talking about the Chinese dream. So NPR's Beijing bureau asked the Chinese to define their dreams. Here's what they said.

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Chasing The Chinese Dream — If You Can Define It

Monday, April 29, 2013

Touted in the state-run media, "the Chinese dream" is Beijing's latest official slogan. The man who made the phrase famous says it means China becoming the world's No. 1 superpower. But as censors scrub unapproved versions of the concept from the Internet, people wonder: Just whose dream is it anyway?

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For Chinese Women, Marriage Depends On Right 'Bride Price'

Tuesday, April 23, 2013

China's one-child only policy and historic preference for boys has led to a surplus of marriageable Chinese men. Young women are holding out for better apartments, cars and the like from potential spouses. And prospective in-laws are socking away savings to try to appeal to a future daughter-in-law.

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China's New Urban Legend That Turned Out Not To Be

Thursday, April 18, 2013

For several hours today, a story went viral on the Chinese Internet that the new Communist equivalent of the emperor, President Xi Jinping, had pulled an old trick from an imperial playbook and traveled incognito among ordinary citizens. The legend of The President Who Took a Taxi was quickly shut down.

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Inside North Korea, No Obvious Signs Of Crisis

Monday, April 08, 2013

The international community is bracing for further provocative actions in North Korea's campaign of bluster and escalation. But visitors to the reclusive country say the capital Pyongyang does not appear to be on war footing.

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