Streams

Kristen Meinzer

Kristen Meinzer appears in the following:

The All-White World of 'Girls'

Friday, April 27, 2012

"Girls," written by and starring Lena Dunham, was initially the subject of overwhelming praise for telling the story of twenty-something New York females in a new way. But in the two weeks since the series premiered, "Girls" went from being praised to being the object of overwhelming vitriol. From the blogosphere to the New York Times, critics have asked: Why does this show, which takes place in Brooklyn, New York in 2012, have an entirely white cast? Russell Robinson is professor of law at the University of California, Berkeley and the author of a study on race, ethnicity and gender casting in Hollywood. Melissa Silverstein is the editor of Women and Hollywood and the artistic director of the Athena Film Festival.

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Here Comes the Sun and It's All Right

Thursday, April 26, 2012

And according to our partner the BBC, the contract for a project called "Solar Orbiter" is set to be signed today. A project of the European Space Agency, the Solar Orbiter will get closer to the sun than any satellite up until now. Dr. Michio Kaku knows a lot about outer space and about future possibilities. A theoretical physicist, he’s the author of the New York Times bestseller "Physics of the Future." He’s here to walk us through what we might learn from this new space project.

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John Edwards Corruption Trial: Day 4 on the Stand for Former Aide Andrew Young

Thursday, April 26, 2012

Today is the third day of the federal corruption trial of former Senator John Edwards, who is charged with violating campaign finance law. Edwards allegedly used money given to him by wealthy supporters to hide his affair with Rielle Hunter and their subsequent love child while running for the Democratic presidential nomination in 2008. Yesterday, the defense cross-examined Edwards' former aide Andrew Young – who had testified that Edwards directed him to use funds from donors to take care of Ms. Hunter. Kim Severson, Atlanta bureau chief for our partner The New York Times, was in the courtroom yesterday.

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How Far Should States Be Able to Go to Stop Illegal Immigration?

Wednesday, April 25, 2012

Today the Supreme Court will consider whether Arizona’s approach to illegal immigration clashes with federal law. If they decide it does, what else will states be able do to address their concerns over illegal immigration?

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Lonely In A Digital Age

Wednesday, April 25, 2012

Many of us spend hours with our smartphones and computers, texting and emailing. We peruse social networking sites, updating our followers several times a day on our moods and thoughts. In many ways, it seems we have greater safeguards against loneliness than we ever have. But Professor Sherry Turkle wonders if, in the age of digital saturation, we’ve sacrificed conversation for mere connection. 

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Undocumented and Abused at the Border

Tuesday, April 24, 2012

Each year, more than 25,000 undocumented immigrants are apprehended as they attempt to cross the border from Mexico to the United States. In most cases, we hear very few details about these apprehensions. But in one case, the details — which are especially gruesome — have become widely circulated.

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Movie Date: 'The Lucky One'

Friday, April 20, 2012

He's got to be strong. He's got to be able to build a barn and get along with children. Being able to play a sultry, sexy musical instrument also helps. In case it wasn't apparent already, this week we're talking about Kristen's fantasy man. And also some movie called "The Lucky One," starring Zac Efron. Let Kristen and Rafer's sultry voices and razor-sharp smarts woo you in this week's podcast.

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Why are Young Americans Driving Less?

Friday, April 20, 2012

The open road: it’s part of the American dream. Or, at least, it used to be. A new study finds that 16- to 34-year-olds without driver’s licenses rose to 26 percent in 2010 from 21 percent a decade earlier. At the same time, biking, walking, and other driving alternatives rose among young people in the past decade. Tony Dutzik is a senior policy analyst at the Frontier Group and co-author of the study. Takeaway listener Emily is a 25-year-old who rarely drives, and didn't get her license until she was 19.

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New Movie Releases: 'Chimpanzee,' 'The Lucky One,' 'Darling Companion,' 'Think Like a Man'

Friday, April 20, 2012

Friday has come again, which means another movie weekend is upon us. Rafer Guzman and Kristen Meinzer take to their critical perch as our intrepid Movie Date team. 

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Latino or Hispanic: What's in a Label?

Thursday, April 19, 2012

Latino and Hispanic: they're terms that a lot of Americans are asked to choose between when identifying themselves on the census, in official paperwork, and in everyday conversation. But according to a new poll by the Pew Hispanic Center, most adults of Latin American descent prefer not to use either. Instead, the respondents said they preferred to identify themselves by their country of origin.

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Remembering Dick Clark

Thursday, April 19, 2012

Yesterday, Dick Clark passed away. But the stamp he left on the world is still very much apparent. We remember him today with two people who know his story well. John Jackson is the author of “American Bandstand: Dick Clark and the Making of a Rock 'n' Roll Empire.” And Lew Klein was the executive producer of American Bandstand, who hired Dick Clark fresh out of college.

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Do Colombians Care About the Secret Service Prostitution Scandal?

Thursday, April 19, 2012

The Secret Service prostitution scandal in Cartagena, Colombia has dominated U.S. headlines and attracted responses from a number of high-profile Americans including the president himself. Obama said last weekend: "If it turns out that some of the allegations made in the press are confirmed, then of course I'll be angry." But what do Colombians think of the whole scandal? Miriam Wells is managing editor with Colombia Reports in Colombia.

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Smartphones Are Bringing Us Together and Tearing Us Apart

Wednesday, April 18, 2012

Chances are you use email. If you’re like 88 percent of Americans, you also own a cell phone. And if you’re among the well-connected 46 percent, you check your email ON your cell phone. All of this can make us feel more connected. But it can also make us less connected to those who are sitting right next to us. And it can be addictive. What to do?

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Julian Assange: The Next Oprah?

Wednesday, April 18, 2012

 

From Oprah to Piers Morgan, the world loves a good talk show. And if the multiple seasons of Celebrity Apprentice have taught us anything, audiences also love reality TV shows featuring pseudo celebrities. Yesterday, a program premiered that’s a tiny bit of both. Entitled "The World Today," the new talk show is hosted by Julian Assange, the man most famous for founding WikiLeaks. Alessandra Stanley, television critic for The New York Times, watched the first episode of "The World Today." She shares her thoughts on whether Assange might be the next Ellen, or just another candidate for Celebrity Big Brother.

 

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Sharia Law: What It Is, What It Isn't

Tuesday, April 17, 2012

In the news, Sharia law is frequently depicted as a system that condones women being stoned. In the movies, it’s the reason why petty thieves find their hands on the chopping block. But what, exactly, is Sharia law all about? Sadakat Kadri, author of "Heaven on Earth," a history of Sharia law and its many interpretations, explains.

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The 2012 Pulitzers, and What They Say About News

Tuesday, April 17, 2012

Ninety-five years ago, the very first Pulitzer Prizes for Journalism were awarded to a few good newspapers. And, of course, back then, it was all black and white newsprint. But a lot has changed since 1917. Explaining how news — and news awards — are shifting with the times, is Sig Gissler, who has been the Pulitzer Prize administrator since 2002. He’s also a journalism professor at Columbia University.

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Avoiding War with China Through Cyber War Games

Tuesday, April 17, 2012

When we hear the words "war games," many of us think of the 1983 blockbuster starring Matthew Broderick and Ally Sheedy. In the film "War Games", suspicions of computer technology collide with cold war fears to tell a parable in which the lesson is that no one wins in a game of war. But can war games actually help us avoid war? James Lewis thinks so.

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Jackie Robinson's Legacy

Monday, April 16, 2012

For today's sports fans, it’s hard to imagine professional teams segregated by color. That changed 65 years ago when Jack Roosevelt Robinson, the son of Georgia sharecroppers, joined the Brooklyn Dodgers to become the first African-American in major league baseball. American sports have come a long way since 1947, but maybe not far enough. This season, just over eight percent of professional baseball players are black. That's less than half of what it was in 1959, when the last team was integrated. Are we living up to or failing Jackie Robinson's legacy? Author of "Opening Day: The Story of Jackie Robinson’s First Season", Jonathan Eig, explains.

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Virginia Tech, Five Years Later

Monday, April 16, 2012

Today marks five years since Seung-Hui Cho killed 32 people and injured 25 others at Virginia Tech, making it the deadliest American shooting in history. Heavy media coverage has depicted an uptick in school shootings in recent years, but violence in American schools has been a problem for a long time. Rebecca Coffey, a science journalist for Scientific American and Discover Magazine, joins us to discuss: What have we learned since Virginia Tech?

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Can Zimmerman Get a Fair Trial?

Friday, April 13, 2012

Could all the public attention affect George Zimmerman’s right to a fair trial? It’s a question that Wendy Kaminer has been mulling over. Kaminer is a lawyer, social critic, and correspondent at The Atlantic. She’s also the author of eight books, including “Worst Instincts: Cowardice, Conformity, and the ACLU.”

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